The New Chaucer Society

New Chaucer Society Statement on the Death of George Floyd

2020 Biennial Congress Rescheduled

Announcing the Donald Howard Travel Scholarship

NCS Congress 2020 Registration Now LIVE

NCS 2020: Conference Program

Volume 41 (2019)

Nolan Lecture

Figure 3:

 

 

Figure 4:

Stones Left Unturned (Psst! More New Chaucer Life Records)

NCS 2020: Call for Papers

BIENNIAL LONDON CHAUCER CONFERENCE: CHAUCER AND EUROPE

Call for submissions: In honor of Gloria Cigman

CALL FOR SESSIONS

International Piers Plowman Society - Anne Middleton Book Prize

White Attunement

SAC 40 - Sample Article

Studies in the Age of Chaucer
Volume 40 (2018)

Transmedial Technics in Chaucer’s Treatise on the Astrolabe: Translation, Instrumentation, and Scientific Imagination

J. Allan Mitchell
University of Victoria

Abstract

An astrolabe is a versatile technical medium that rescales and renders aspects of the world at large. Accordingly, I argue that Chaucer’s Treatise on the Astrolabe configures perceptions of the environment through varieties of simultaneous translation. As a translated text, the treatise mobilizes knowledge practices drawn from diverse languages and scientific cultures; as a technical object, the accompanying device expresses correspondences among observed phenomena. The result is a technoscientific idealization of a common world propagated by prose instruction and physical instrumentation. Verbal, numerical, geometrical, and material figures are also joined by uncanny metaphors that augment and intensify the astrolabe’s ecological orientation. Affiliated zoomorphic images of the spider, horse, and eagle suggest that the instrument embodies more-than-human sentience and skill, virtually distributing agency across an imagined multispecies spectrum. The essay concludes with Chaucer’s cautious consideration of scientific intermediaries in The Squire’s Tale and The House of FameThe article is presented on this website together with a video clip demonstrating the three-coordinate system mentioned on pp.18-19 (credit Stellarium.org).

See the full article here.

The 2019 SMFS Foremothers Fellowship

NCS 2020 - Call for Threads

Incoming Executive Director’s Remarks to the Members Parliament

Welcome Thomas Goodmann, Executive Director

Volume 40 (2018)

#NCS18 ROOM CHANGES FOR THURSDAY, JULY 12

#NCS18 TORONTO

Acknowledgements

Land Acknowledgment

We wish to acknowledge the land on which the University of Toronto operates. For thousands of years it has been the traditional land of the Huron-Wendat, the Seneca, and most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit River. Today, this meeting place is still the home to many Indigenous people from across Turtle Island and we are grateful to have the opportunity to meet and work on this land.

NCS18 @ University of Toronto

Local Organizer: Alexandra Gillespie; Local Host: William Robins, President, Victoria University; Project Managers: Laura Mitchell; Julia King; Ara Glenn-Johanson; Local Committee: Suzanne Akbari, Jonathan Brent; Kara Gaston; Cai Henderson; Jessica Lockhart; Matt Sergi; Graduate Student Volunteers: Julianna Chianelli; Brianna Daigneault; Jessica Henderson; Julie Mattison; Morgan Moore; Katheryne Morrissette; Jack Twosmokes; Undergraduate Student Volunteers: Alaheh Amini; Batool Amiree; Mussié Berhane; Shawna Browarsky-Quigley; Mahera Islam; Amanda Stasiuk; Julia Toljagic.; wWith kind assistance from: Pearce Carefoote, Julia Culpeper, Robert Eberts, and Merrylee Greenan.

The NCS18 Graduate Workshop Organizer was Kara Gaston, University of Toronto, with instruction from Suzanne Akbari, University of Toronto; Orietta Da Rold, St. John’s College, University of Cambridge; Sonja Drimmer, University of Massachusetts Amherst; Carissa M. Harris, Temple University; Simon Horobin, Magdalen College, University of Oxford; Jeannie Miller, University of Toronto; Daniel Wakelin, St. Hilda’s College, University of Oxford; the Teachers’ Workshop Organizers were Kara Crawford, The Bishop's School, La Jolla, CA and Candace Barrington, Central Connecticut State University, with Michael Kuczynski, Tulane University. The Organizers of the NCS18 Mentorship Program were: Tom Hahn, University of Rochester; Shazia Jagot, University of Surrey; and Sierra Lomuto, Macalester College, organized the NCS18 Mentorship Program. Thanks to all of them.

Thanks also to Fiona Somerset, University of Connecticut, for running errands magnificently; James Dylan Sargan, University of Oxford, and Anna Wilson, Harvard University, for their work on the LGBTQIA+ Get Together. We are grateful to; Sasha Suda, Art Gallery of Ontario, and Seeta Chaganti, University of California DavisBerkeley, for their work on the AGO-MOC Reception, with help from other Medievalists of Color: Sierra Lomuto; Jonathan Hsy, George Washington University; Wan-Chuan Kao, Washington and Lee University; Dorothy Kim, Brandeis University; Shyama Rajendran, University of Wyoming; Cord Whitaker, Wellesley College; Mariah Min, University of Pennsylvania; and Nahir Otañno Gracia, Beloit College,.

NCS

President 2016-18: Ardis Butterfield, Yale University; Executive Director: Ruth Evans, St. Louis University; Administrative Assistant: Jessica Rezunyk, Upper Canada College; Trustees 2014-18: Candace Barrington;, Alexandra Gillespie;, David Matthews, University of Manchester; Trustees 2016-2020: Anthony Bale, Birkbeck College, University of London; Simon Horobin; Patricia Ingham, Indiana University, Bloomington; Emily Steiner, University of Pennsylvania

NCS18 Program Chairs: Robert J. Meyer-Lee, Agnes Scott College, and Claire M. Waters, University of California, Davis; NCS18 Program Committee: Louise d'Arcens, Macquarie University; Jonathan Hsy; Elliot Kendall, University of Exeter; Sebastian Sobecki, University of Groningen

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

We are grateful for the support we have received from the University of Toronto, most especially from Victoria University. At the tri-campus University of Toronto we have received kind support from the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies; the Centre for Medieval Studies; St. Michael’s College; Trinity College; University College; Massey College and the Book History and Print Culture Program; University of Toronto Libraries; the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library; the Department of English; the Department for the Study of Religion; the Department of Spanish and Portuguese; the Graduate Department of Art; the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies; the Centre for Comparative Literature; the Department of History; the Emilio Goggio Chair in Italian Studies; the Canada Research Chair in Medieval Philosophy; the Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations; and the Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies. We are grateful to the Department of English at the University of Toronto Scarborough; and, at the University of Toronto Mississauga, to Theatre Erindale, the Department of English and Drama, the Department of Language Studies, and the Department of Visual Studies for support. We are also grateful to the Art Gallery of Ontario for the use of their spaces events and exhibits. 

Conduct at the Congress

The New Chaucer Society values diversity, and is committed to building a supportive and positive professional environment for the participants at our 2018 Toronto Congress. We will strive to ensure that all our members feel included, and that everyone is treated fairly and with courtesy according to our statement of ethics:

The Society endorses the highest standard of professional ethics. We are committed to defending academic freedom, acknowledging and crediting prior research by others, and conducting our professional lives with personal dignity and respect for others. Members are advised to consult the MLA's Statement of Professional Ethics, which NCS endorses: http://www.mla.org/repview_profethics.

If you wish to talk about an incident of bullying, harassment, discrimination, or disrespectful behavior at the Congress, please contact Ruth Evans (ruth.evans@slu.edu), Ardis Butterfield (ardis.butterfield@yale.edu), Alex Gillespie (alexandra.gillespie@utoronto.ca), or Anthony Bale (a.bale@bbk.ac.uk).

Original Call for Papers

NCS 2018 Toronto Call for Papers

Dear Members,

We are happy to announce the Call for Papers for the next meeting of the New Chaucer Society. The meeting will be held July 10th–15th, 2018 at the University of Toronto. An exciting program is in the works, and we hope that you will find much in the Call for Papers that interests you. Before looking at the session descriptions, please take a minute to read the Guidelines for Submission and the description of Session Types.

As we mentioned in the call for session proposals, in the interest of leaving room for a wide range of topics, we have this year limited the number of threads to six: Chaucer Abroad, Forming Knowledge, History Now, Language Contacts, Making the Text, and Middle English Literature at Scale. Following the description of the Research Expo, the sessions within threads are listed first, after which are the many independent sessions. We have also, as described below, offered two new session types—lightning talks and position papers—to clarify the different forms and aims of sessions with shorter papers (previously called roundtables).

Big thanks for getting us this far toward Toronto 2018 are owed to the members of the Program Committee: Louise D’Arcens, Jonathan Hsy, Elliot Kendall, and Sebastian Sobecki, with Ruth Evans, Ardis Butterfield, and Alex Gillespie ex officio; to the thread organizers; to Jessica Rezunyk for all things technical; and of course to all the session organizers.

We look forward to receiving your abstracts!

Best wishes,

Bobby Meyer-Lee and Claire Waters
Co-Chairs, NCS 2018 Program Committee

 

 

GUIDELINES FOR SUBMISSION

You may submit to only one session, including the Research Expo (a change in policy that the Program Committee has implemented at the recommendation of past NCS organizers). If sessions receive more abstracts that merit a place on the program than they can use, the Program Committee will create new sessions as needed—and so your abstract will not be rejected simply because of your choice of session.

A contribution to the conference in a service capacity—as, for example, a workshop leader, participant in a panel on professional issues, or session chair—does not preclude your participation elsewhere as a presenter of your own research or as a respondent.

The deadline for submissions has now passed. Please do not email abstracts to the session organizers; their addresses have been provided should you have a question regarding the session. Abstracts should be no more than 250 words.

Abstracts are due April 24, 2017.

You need not be an NCS member to submit an abstract, but you must be one before presenting at the conference. Waivers of the membership requirement may be granted for scholars who work in disciplines other than medieval language and literature.

 

SESSION TYPES

NCS 2018 features some changes in session types and terminology. While paper panels and seminars will retain the form that they’ve had in recent years, in response to feedback from the membership the Program Committee has decided to divide the “roundtable” format into two different formats. One features short presentations that address a shared topic; we’re calling these “lightning talks.” The other asks speakers to take positions on a significant, specific question in the field and aims to generate debate; these will be “position papers.” We hope that the change will make the aims of each kind of format clearer. In addition, to reflect more accurately the role of the poster session, we have redesignated it the “Research Expo.”

Paper Panels: A paper panel showcases scholarly work in the form of extended presentations of 20 minutes each. A paper panel will include no more than 3 presenters total (either 3 papers or 2 papers and a respondent) and will allow for at least 30 minutes of open discussion.

Lightning Talks: The goal of lightning talks is to present an array of new work and focus discussion on a shared topic. These sessions will feature up to 6 speakers and presentations of 5–7 minutes, to allow for at least 45 minutes of open discussion.

Position Papers: These sessions, with up to 5 speakers, address a shared question and are specifically intended to foster debate and to consider the state of the field. Papers will be 7–8 minutes to ensure time for discussion.

Seminars: The goal of a seminar is to generate extended conversation about a topic before, during, and after the NCS meeting. Participants will circulate and discuss materials in advance of the seminar. Seminars will include no more than 7 presenters and allow for at least one hour of open discussion.

 

RESEARCH EXPO

Organizers: Matthew Fisher, fisher@humnet.ucla.edu; Rebecca McNamara, rebecca.fields.mcnamara@gmail.com

Those whose research or teaching lends itself to a visual format, or who are interested in trying alternative modes of scholarly or pedagogical communication, are encouraged to submit an abstract for a poster presentation. During the conference, all posters will be displayed in a single time slot in a central location, with presenters in attendance to discuss their work and answer questions.

Posters can be an effective medium for articulating the key focus or outcomes of your work, or the processes of research itself; they can be used to showcase a particular artifact or case study and findings. The 2016 NCS Conference in London saw over 20 posters presented on a rich range of topics from the work of specific scribes and the idiosyncrasies of particular manuscripts, to poetics and aesthetics, to neurology and augmented reality. We hope to continue the tradition of including work by a diverse group of teachers and scholars both junior and senior on topics conventional and adventurous, using similarly varied approaches. We are particularly interested in submissions from those who want to present their research findings around a central item of focus without privileging one particular path through their data.

Submissions to the Research Expo should include a title and the proposed content and format for the presentation: what you plan to present on your poster, how it will be presented, and what is gained in presenting your work in this way. Please note that this year there will be provision for posters to be printed at the venue in Toronto, with up to a 50% subsidy from NCS, easing concerns about cost and logistics.

Useful general information on research posters and their formats has been published by New York University, Pennsylvania State University, Colorado State University, Purdue’s Online Writing Lab, and the American Historical Association.

 

THREAD 1: CHAUCER ABROAD
Organizers: Louise D'Arcens, louise.darcens@mq.edu.au; Jonathan Hsy, jhsy@gwu.edu

1. Border-Crossings: Chaucer’s Italy
Organizer: Kathryn McKinley, kmckinle@umbc.edu
Format: Lightning Talks

This session will focus on geographical, conceptual, political, and aesthetic “border-crossings” which Chaucer carried out on diplomatic trips to Italy (1372–78) and upon his return. Papers might address his acts of diplomacy on behalf of Edward III and Richard II; late medieval English constructions of and/or commerce with “Ytaille;” the trecento reception of English diplomats and visitors; learning/speaking Italian in late medieval London; or Italian merchant reading communities and copyists, among other topics. They could also address, as intellectual and aesthetic border-crossings, Chaucer’s “translations” of Boccaccio’s writings, poetics, and theories of the vernacular as a means of negotiating with/contesting Dante.

2. Chaucer Abroad: Who Owns Chaucer Now?
Organizers: Louise D'Arcens, louise.darcens@mq.edu.au; Jonathan Hsy, jhsy@gwu.edu
Format: Position Papers

This session is a paired inquiry with session 35 in Thread 5: “Loving and Hating Chaucer in the 21st Century”
While Chaucer’s enduring position at the center of Middle English studies is increasingly interrogated within Anglophone literary studies, this session focuses on Chaucer’s cultural and geopolitical functions across the globe. Who owns the medieval past, and whose past is medieval? Should Chaucerians dispersed across the world participate in political debates regarding English, British, or European identity (past or present)? How do reception histories and artistic appropriations of the medieval past worldwide reframe understandings of race, home, and cultural belonging? What duties do we have to far-flung international audiences in our acts of scholarship, teaching, editing, or publishing?

3. Chaucer and Muslim Readers
Organizer: Candace Barrington, BarringtonC@ccsu.edu
Format: Seminar

This seminar brings together faculty and teachers interested in sharing and learning enhanced resources for students with backgrounds in Islam and Middle Eastern languages. Possible topics include three overlapping concerns. First, language: what are the consequences of students reading in Middle English, present-day English, and/or non-Anglophone translations? Second, resources: what is the quality of secondary resources and availability of textbooks? Third, transcultural awareness: what medieval English values, institutions, and practices are alien to Muslim and Middle Eastern students? Pedagogical practices explored in this seminar will be applicable to any twenty-first century classroom.

4. Chaucer on Islam and the East
Organizers: David Hadbawnik, dhadbawnik@gmail.com; Susie Nakley, snakley@sjcny.edu
Format: Paper Panel

Chaucer accents Eastern elements beyond those present in his sources. He lavishes attention on Syrian women—Zenobia (Monk's Tale), the Sultaness (Man of Law's Tale)—and on Dido (Legend of Good Women and House of Fame); he heightens Islam’s role in Man of Law's Tale, sets Squire's Tale and Prioress’s Tale in eastern lands, and compiles eighth-century Egyptian astronomer Messahala’s texts in Treatise on the Astrolabe. From characters to content to forms, Arabic learning and Eastern elements reverberate. We seek papers addressing such elements in Chaucer, both how Islam and the East shape Chaucer's poetry and, reciprocally, how Chaucer reshapes Islam and the East.

5. Marginal Chaucer: Chaucer Studies in Non-English Academia
Organizer: Eva von Contzen, eva.voncontzen@anglistik.uni-freiburg.de
Format: Lightning Talks

Chaucer Studies is fundamentally an English endeavor, dominated by departments and scholars from and in English-speaking countries. Yet there is a large group of medievalists who are based abroad, where inevitably medieval English studies is a marginal field. These scholars are often influenced by different academic traditions and face the challenge of participating in the general discussions in the field while engaging with the debates that are prevalent in their own countries. This session brings together speakers who present their experiences of being “expats” of Chaucer Studies. It aims at scrutinizing how they can become ambassadors for trends and approaches that otherwise remain local and exclusive. Topics may include, but are not limited to, potential starting points for fruitful engagement with non-English academic traditions and debates, and how Chaucer Studies can help foster international exchange and diminish the marginalization of medieval English studies abroad.

6. Metrolingualism
Organizer: Karla Mallette, alrak@umich.edu
Format: Lightning Talks

This session is offered in cooperation with Thread 4, Language Contacts.
What happens to language in cities? Mindful of, but looking beyond, Chaucer’s multilingual London, this session encourages submissions that consider cities within and outside Chaucer’s ambit as sites of linguistic plurality and layering. How are languages networked in the pre-modern world—and in urban space in particular? How do languages signal the existence of other languages beyond themselves? Are individual languages clearly distinguished and differentiated from each other, or are the boundaries between them porous and labile? Are languages self-aware? Papers might explore specialized professional languages, linguistic mash-ups and calques, multi-lingual actors and the perils (or pleasures) of monolingualism, or the ways that language is deployed to travel in particular urban environments in late-medieval cultures.

7. Reassessing Boundaries: Chaucer and Medieval European Literatures
Organizer: Shazia Jagot, jagot@sdu.dk
Format: Paper Panel

From Mongol Sarai and Muslim Syria to Castilian kings, Persian polymaths, and crusading arenas that stretch from the Baltic to North Africa, Chaucer’s literary imagination spans geographies and cultures that are often considered to lie beyond the boundaries of “Europe.” This panel seeks to explore and interrogate the notion of “Europe” in relation to such perceived peripheral places in the age of Chaucer from a historical cross-cultural perspective: how are boundaries conceived, contested and/or imagined in relation to intellectual, scientific, cultural and literary exchanges? How can we compare/connect places, ideas and texts? What makes something “European?” Papers may address any aspect of such cross-cultural contact, particularly in light of new critical approaches to the concept of Medieval European Literatures, such as those formulated by David Wallace and outlined in a recent issue of Interfaces: A Journal of Medieval European Literatures.

8. The Woman Question: Chaucer in his European Context
Organizers: Betsy McCormick, BMcCormick@MtSAC.edu; Lynn Shutters, lynn.shutters@colostate.edu
Format: Seminar

This “working research seminar” will consider Chaucer’s relationship to late medieval European intellectual and literary traditions of women, including story collections of classical women; the Querelles des Femmes; conduct literature; and the Griselda story, among others. We invite papers that reexamine Chaucer’s engagement with these various European traditions. Authors often gain praise for how they distinguish themselves from tradition; thus Chaucer was once imagined as moving through and beyond French and Italian phases to emerge as a great English poet. How might we now benefit from examining similarities rather than differences between Chaucer and continental traditions, particularly those that theorize and represent women? For more on the “working research seminar” model, see: http://www.shakespeareassociation.org/seminars-and-workshops/guidelines/.

 

THREAD 2: FORMING KNOWLEDGE
Organizers: Michelle Karnes, michellekarnes@nd.edu; Julie Orlemanski, julieorlemanski@uchicago.edu

9. Carnal Knowledge
Organizers: Joe Stadolnik, jstadolnik@gmail.com; Carissa M. Harris, carissa.harris@temple.edu
Format: Lightning Talks

If, as Carolyn Dinshaw has argued, the body is “a field on which issues of representation and interpretation are literally and metaphorically played out,” how might we account for acts of carnal exploration and violation as forays into such a hermeneutic field? This session invites lightning talks on diverse modes of carnal apprehension in the later Middle Ages—from Thomas’s doubt to surgeons’ probing, from physiognomic treatises to lyrics about sexual violence, in which female speakers present their bodily trauma as a privileged form of knowledge about class and gender inequalities. In these and other texts, how is knowledge of the body newly grasped through (for instance) intimate observation, suffering, or intrusion? How are these processes implicated in the knowledge-work of texts and textual genres? How are medieval thinkers’ bodies implicated in the knowledge they produce?

10. Chaucer “And”: Methods of Interdisciplinarity
Organizer: Michelle Karnes, michellekarnes@nd.edu
Format: Paper Panel

As medievalists continue to direct their attention outward, toward different times, places, disciplines, cultures, and languages, their approaches are increasingly interdisciplinary. Studies of post-medieval Chaucer, of Chaucer inside and outside of Europe, of Chaucer and various branches of medieval science, among others, have become familiar to us, but invite further investigation. Is there what might be called a “method of interdisciplinarity,” which unites such approaches? Do these various approaches have ultimately similar aims? What assumptions underlie them, and what draws scholars to them? Unlike other sessions interested in the content of specific forms of interdisciplinary scholarship, this one is focused on its methods: how do we practice interdisciplinarity in Chaucer studies, and why do we employ the methods we employ? What are the most promising tactics and approaches for new research?

11. Chaucer’s “Cavillaciouns” and the Sophistries of Knowledge
Organizer: Neil Cartlidge, cartlidgeneil@me.com
Format: Paper Panel

The Middle English Dictionary defines cavillacioun as “the practice of making trivial or insincere objections or presenting captious, evasive or spurious arguments; cavilling, quibbling, sophistry, fraud, or an instance of it.” This session invites consideration of specific instances of cavilling, quibbling, sophistry, or intellectual fraud in in Chaucer’s works, and/or of the ways in which such moments reflect fourteenth-century attitudes to the establishment of knowledge and the defining of truth in general. To what purpose(s), for example, does Chaucer depict literalistic or legalistic attitudes to contracts or codes? And to what extent does Chaucer’s depiction of cavillacioun(s) reflect real unease about over-cleverness and demonstrative intellectualism in general?

12. Fictionality
Organizer: Mary Raschko, raschkml@whitman.edu
Format: Paper Panel

This panel invites reflection on the instructive role of feigned, imaginative, or counterfactual narratives in the later Middle Ages. While we often attribute an ethical, action-oriented function to medieval storytelling, this panel seeks to understand the philosophical dimensions of fiction, its role in truth-telling and intellectual inquiry. How, presenters might ask, do fictional stories construct or organize knowledge? What types of knowledge (empathic, mystical, natural, etc.) does fiction especially generate? If Middle English literature should both entertain and instruct, how might humor, fantasy, or suspense generate particular ways of knowing? Likewise, how could the truth-telling or knowledge-construction within fiction be a source of delight?

13. Household Sciences and the Arts of Conduct
Organizers: Rory Critten, rory.critten@ens.unibe.ch; Arthur Russell, ajr171@case.edu
Format: Lightning Talks

This session invites novel approaches to the arts of conduct in late medieval England. Our aim is to reconsider the tradition of texts on table manners, household ethics, and other forms of etiquette, while at the same time addressing materials not typically grouped under the “conduct” rubric but which likewise arbitrate everyday praxis. Such texts include agricultural and gardening treatises, medical and scientific manuals, and catalogs and calendars. Lightning talks might take up questions like the following: How do codes of conduct embody and transmit knowledge? How does form affect reception? Can resistant readings to conduct literature be envisaged? How do conduct texts interface with other types of texts, in what manuscript contexts? How might medieval codifications of everyday praxis speak to present-day conversations about the policing of bodies, behaviors, and ideas? What processes of sexual, racial, gender, and class identity-construction do we inherit from the Middle Ages?

14. Medieval Latour
Organizers: Michelle Karnes, michellekarnes@nd.edu; Julie Orlemanski, julieorlemanski@uchicago.edu
Format: Seminar

Bruno Latour’s work has become prominent within scholarship on the Middle Ages, figuring in analyses of the present’s relation to the past, posthumanism, the history of science, ecocriticism, materiality, and semiotics. We ask prospective panelists to highlight a topic within Latour's corpus that has particular value for medieval studies and to propose a brief selection (about 15 pages) that the audience and fellow panelists might read in advance of the panel to aid discussion. Once selected, panelists will work together to decide on a final list of topics and readings. At the beginning of the seminar, panelists will introduce the readings in order to foment and focus conversation. As with all seminars, an hour will be left for discussion with the audience. We hope that the session will be engaging for those with little knowledge of Latour's work as well as those familiar with it. 

15. Medieval Technocultures
Organizers: Jenna Mead, jenna.mead@uwa.edu.au; Allan Mitchell, amitch@uvic.ca
Format: Paper Panel

Chaucer’s Treatise on the Astrolabe finds itself in the midst of a “techno turn” in which functional interfaces, instruments, and techno-scientific ways of knowing are gaining new prominence. Medieval technocultures will explore animating features of early devices, technics, or analytics. We invite presenters to take up such topics as physical media, visual diagrams, haptic feedback, literacy/numeracy, and their effects in and for literary history. We welcome those who stretch or bend the format to incorporate demos, models, ficto-criticism, interviews, the biography of an object, or intellectual geography. Speakers will, broadly speaking, address medieval techno-sciences that tend to propagate object-dependent knowledges. How is information located in an instrument, system, or praxis? Where is science situated?

16. Tried, True, and Innovative Approaches to Research
Organizer: John Hoarty, john.hoarty@ignatius.org
Format: Lightning Talks

This session explores the ways in which we teach research methods, both fundamental and advanced, and the impact of our pedagogical approaches on our understanding of medieval studies. Some possible topics: what distinct pedagogical challenges and possibilities arise in teaching medieval literature for instructors of graduate, undergraduate, and secondary school students? How do relationships between instructor and student as well as between researcher and content lead to the formation of knowledge? What is the role and responsibility of the researcher in medieval studies, and do our roles differ from those of researchers in other disciplines? What research topics engender the most inquiry, and what methods best serve students as they form their own understanding of knowledge? How do instructors navigate the oft-hazardous yet potentially rewarding pursuit of content available in digital formats? How do instructors negotiate between traditional and innovative research methods?

17. The Value of Truth
Organizer: Julie Orlemanski, julieorlemanski@uchicago.edu
Format: Position Papers

What is the value of truth? This session asks each participant to take a stance on how truth matters, either to histories of medieval knowledge or for us today. Of course, what “truth” means is not straightforward. Middle English treuth variously denoted fidelity, righteousness, doctrine, and correspondence to reality. In historical grands récits, the Middle Ages appear both slavishly beholden to theological truths and blind to the rational truths of the Enlightenment. Today, we’re sometimes said to live in a “post-truth” society, whether because politicians lie with impunity or because the contextual conditions of truth-claims are widely acknowledged. Moreover, the past two decades of Middle English studies have criticized and proposed alternatives to the positivism that once determined the truths of our field. Has “truth” changed for us? Participants are invited to stake a position as to what the worth of “truth” might be.

 

THREAD 3: HISTORY NOW
Organizers: Elliot Kendall, E.R.Kendall@exeter.ac.uk; Sebastian Sobecki, s.i.sobecki@rug.nl

18. Balancing Acts: Pedagogical Approaches to Interdisciplinary Humanities Coursework
Organizer: Kara Crawford, crawfordk@bishops.com
Format: Lightning Talks

Interdisciplinary courses and curricular programs are experiencing a resurgence, but the challenges of developing interdisciplinary coursework only begin with logistics, and collaboration between multiple disciplines can create hierarchies. In encouraging intentional strategies for pedagogical collaboration, this session seeks discussion about what approaches best guide our ways of thinking about contemporary humanities study. When we emphasize historical context, to what extent do we frame the discussion of a medieval text as a cultural artifact? How might we structure approaches that balance awareness of a distant context with an immediate experience of literary art? Where does manuscript studies fit in this mix? What guiding topics and themes most effectively engage multiple disciplines? How do our approaches to interdisciplinary coursework shape how we define history and how we understand the meaning and role of literature in human experience?

19. Chaucer and Church History
Organizers: James Simpson, jsimpson@fas.harvard.edu; Zachary E. Stone, zes9bx@virginia.edu
Format: Paper Panel

This panel explores Chaucer’s relationship to church history. How, we ask, did the ecclesiological upheavals of Chaucer’s era mark his conception of the church as a historical entity? Or, from a different point of view, how might the history of the English Church in the fourteenth, fifteenth, sixteenth, and seventeenth centuries have determined the formation of English literary history grounded in Chaucer’s poetry? In what ways might church history be the driver of both periodization and literary history?

20. Do We Need Periodization?
Organizer: Katherine C. Little, katherine.c.little@colorado.edu
Format: Position Papers

Medieval studies has not been entirely well-served by traditional periodization, since the med/Ren divide produces a kind of opposition: religious, communal, boring vs. secular, individual, new. And so in the last 20–30 years medievalists have attempted to break down (or through) this divide. In response to such volumes as Brian Cummings and James Simpson’s (eds.) Cultural Reformations, it is now worth asking whether what is gained by this revision is greater than what is lost. This session seeks position papers on the topic of periodization that address questions such as: Does one need an idea of the Middle Ages in order to teach and study it? What would replace traditional periodization were we to dispense with it? Does periodization prioritize certain kinds of historical change, and, if so, what are they and why? Is the term used in recent English histories of drama—Tudor—more or less helpful?

21. Figuring the Marginal in Late Medieval Society and Its Texts
Organizer: Roger Nicholson, r.nicholson@auckland.ac.nz
Format: Paper Panel

Excluded from good society, marginal figures tend to be registered in legal records, an “archive of repression” (Geremek). Whatever their excluded group, their “abjected alterity” (Butler) enforces established social order even as they may constitute a zone of transgressive pleasure for good society, offering the opportunity of living dangerously (Hanawalt).

Do historical and literary studies give us reconcilable accounts of the marginalized? Apt for historical understanding of the marginalized is a mode close to fiction, the microhistory, which couples social structures with a focus on lives in the everyday (as explored in a recent issue of JMEMS, for example). But what are the consequences of repressive archive and transgressive lure for understanding medieval fiction? Are particular genres (outlaw story, tales of trickery) peculiarly responsive to marginal lives, being "rooted in the real” (like microhistory) even when they engage in a play of conventions? Do novel subjectivities arise in marginalized, “in-between spaces” that “initiate new signs of identity” (Bhabha)?

22. Gendered History, Historicized Gender
Organizer: Elizabeth Robertson, elizabeth.robertson@glasgow.ac.uk
Format: Paper Panel

When the New Historicism was near its apogee, there was some controversy regarding its relation to feminism. As Wai-Chee Dimock wrote in American Literature in 1991, “If the feminist chronicling of women's oppression and celebration of women's difference have appeared misguided to many New Historicists, the New Historicist universalization of power and blurring of genders have struck many feminists as nothing short of reactionary.” As we reconsider the directions of historical analysis, it is appropriate to revisit questions of gender and history. This session seeks papers that offer innovative historicized analyses of gender, or that consider whether historically oriented critical approaches subsequent to New Historicism have addressed the quandary that Dimock identified.

23. Let Us Talk Then, You and I: The Future with History
Organizers: Elliot Kendall, E.R.Kendall@exeter.ac.uk; Clementine Oliver, coliver@csun.edu; Sebastian Sobecki, s.i.sobecki@rug.nl
Format: Position Papers

This session seeks to discuss what literary scholars and historians have learned from one another about Chaucer and late medieval culture and society, and whether our conversation is evolving or faltering and being superseded. Does occupying the interstitial spaces between literature and history result in a sharper or richer image, or have the two disciplines been talking at cross purposes? Is now the best moment to evaluate what we have learned from talking together, and will the outcome suggest that it is worthwhile to continue the dialogue between historians and literary scholars? Or are we instead facing a period of retreat, isolation, new alliances?

24. No Keystone to Canterbury: Transhistorical Readings of the Sacred, Sovereign, and Secular
Organizer: Robert Rouse, robert.rouse@ubc.ca
Format: Lightning Talks

Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales stages the competing claims of the sacred and secular in a manner prescient of our contemporary debates over land sovereignty, environmental devastation, and the value of place. What has Chaucerian writing to offer our environmental debates today, and—in the spirit of temporal reciprocity—what might an environmentally aware readership bring to an understanding of the late medieval contexts of Chaucer’s own work? This session will bring together environmental activism with the Book of Nature, indigenous epistemologies with Gene(sis)idal pre-modern European understandings of the relationship between homo and natura, and Chaucerian close reading with ecocritical theoretical framing.

25. The Object In/Of History
Organizers: Kara L. McShane, klmcshane@gmail.com; Jeffery G. Stoyanoff, jstoyanoff@shc.edu
Format: Paper Panel

History traditionally privileges the narrative of anthropocentric society, and thus in any discussion of literature and history we usually find ourselves engaging the elements of literature that also privilege that narrative. Contemporary literary theory, however, has made radical changes to the assumption of anthropocentrism as the default perspective in medieval literature. In particular, Actor-Network Theory (ANT) and Object Oriented Ontology (OOO) have led medievalists to fundamentally revise our understanding of the medieval world. These theories ask us to look at associations between objects and, perhaps most importantly, to realize that humans need not be part of the action, the relationship, or the world at all. This panel, then, seeks submissions that explore these moments in literature where we see the objects in/of history.

 

THREAD 4: LANGUAGE CONTACTS
Organizers: Ardis Butterfield, ardis.butterfield@yale.edu; Claire Waters, cmwaters@ucdavis.edu

26. Anglo-Latin
Organizer: Andrew Kraebel, akraebel@trinity.edu
Format: Paper Panel

As recent interventions by Joseph Farrell, Andrew Galloway, and Nicholas Watson (among others) have helped to make clear, the status of Latin in the later Middle Ages was far more vexed than earlier historiographies allow. Yet, if we can no longer simply consider the relationship between Latin and the vernacular in terms of familiar binaries (of gender, power, culture, etc.), how should we formulate a more rigorously historicized (or otherwise theorized) account of Latin in late-medieval England? This panel seeks papers that, in addressing this question, focus on specific Anglo-Latin authors (e.g., Grosseteste, Rolle, Gower), on Latinate literary trends and discourses (e.g., neoclassicism, scholastic exegesis, liturgical compositions), on works that mix Latin and the vernaculars, or on the place of Latin texts in specific plurilingual manuscripts. Relatedly, papers are also encouraged on the Latinity of Middle English studies in the last century (or more).

27. Aureation
Organizer: Nicholas Watson, nwatson@fas.harvard.edu
Format: Paper Panel

Fifteenth-century English writers admired a heavily Latinate style of poetry and prose that one of them (John Metham) called “half-chongyd Latyn.” Where did this style come from, where did it go, why was it valued, and what does it tell us about literary form and practice in the last medieval century? This session invites papers on the linguistic structure and language politics of aureate poetry, drama, macaronic preaching, and religious, historical, or utilitarian prose in fifteenth-century England and on comparable linguistic and stylistic phenomena in other languages, centuries and places.

28. Implications of French-English Bilingualism
Organizer: Ardis Butterfield, ardis.butterfield@yale.edu
Format: Lightning Talks

Recent work in cultural history and sociolinguistics suggests that the extent of Francophonie in England before 1400 may have been substantially underestimated. This session is designed to encourage consideration of the cultural and social implications of French-English bilingualism in the age of Chaucer, and reconsideration of textual evidence that may have been interpreted in the past to fit the seductive narrative of French’s decline as an English vernacular. Contributors may also wish to discuss the intellectual implications of bridging the disciplinary gaps between English Studies and French Studies, or indeed those between literary and linguistic scholarship.

29. Late Fifteenth-Century Anglo-French
Organizers: R. D. Perry, rdperry@berkeley.edu; and Spencer Strub, spencer.strub@berkeley.edu
Format: Lightning Talks

This panel invites lightning talks on late fifteenth-century Anglo-French literary relations. Heretofore, critics have focused on cross-Channel exchange in the fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries. This panel will extend the Anglo-French tradition further into the fifteenth century, to ask how the final years of the Hundred Years War influenced literary production, and to consider the status of French in England during the Wars of the Roses and the ascension of the Tudors. How does the still-understudied literature of the late fifteenth century carry on Anglo-French literary relations? Where do new forms and new avenues of influence emerge? For the purposes of this panel, the “late fifteenth century” stretches from Lydgate’s collaboration with Benedict Burgh in the 1440s to the writings of Skelton and the Scottish makars.

30. Language Contacts in Manuscript
Organizer: Claire M. Waters, cmwaters@ucdavis.edu
Format: Paper Panel

While the former standard narratives (by Suggett, R.M. Wilson, Berndt, Kibbee and others) of the literary and social roles played by multilingualism in the medieval period have been extensively revised, less attention has been paid to the nature and range of multi- or plurilingual manuscripts across the period, well beyond the well-known case of Piers Plowman. This session calls for work on the production and reception of codices in which languages are juxtaposed, interleaved or otherwise arranged, and asks what kinds of literary, linguistic, theological, social, or political implications there might be in the choice and disposition of languages across genres. Papers might address glossing, marginalia of all kinds, and the use of language in images, as well as the arrangements throughout a booklet or larger section of a manuscript of works in more than one language.

31. The Linguistic Past in Late Medieval England
Organizer: Thomas Hinton, T.G.Hinton@exeter.ac.uk
Format: Paper Panel

This session will consider how the textual material of the past was used by late medieval authors and audiences. What cultural work was implicit in the choice of language, and what linguistic features were considered salient or significant? How did authors understand and respond to the process of language change? To what extent was linguistic diachrony a concern in pedagogical contexts? How accurate or useful is the model which contrasts Latin immutability with vernacular instability? To what extent could the vernacular past aspire to the authority of venerable Latin textual traditions?

32. “The Marches”: The Linguistic Positioning of Border Literature
Organizer: Helen Cushman, helencushman@fas.harvard.edu
Format: Lightning Talks

Recent work on the multilingual border societies of medieval Britain has shown that frontier regions or “Marches” were often productive sites of encounter, language contact, and cultural exchange, particularly in the Marches of Wales and Scotland during England’s efforts to conquer those countries in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. This session weighs the utility of using “the March” as a governing principle for analyzing literature. It considers the tension between viewing a march as a site of cultural transmission and contact (i.e. a line to be crossed) versus a discrete zone in its own right. Participants might address language contact, cultural contact, or the effects of multilingualism in a border context, as well as the extent to which border regions can/should be viewed in relation to the cultural mainstream.

33. Translating the Nonhuman
Organizers: Haylie Swenson, haylie@gwmail.gwu.edu; and Liam Lewis, L.G.Lewis@warwick.ac.uk
Format: Seminar

This seminar invites participants to consider the connections created by translations of the nonhuman into human languages. To what extent is language the domain of the human, and the human defined by language? And how does thinking about nonhumans destabilize these questions? Participants might share work on how nature is translated onto the page, the ways that ideas of humanness are connected to non- or plurilingualism, translations of the nonhuman across genre, and how translation as a contact zone between the human and the nonhuman might encourage exchange and neighborliness between the two.

34. What Happened to Old English After the Tremulous Hand?
Organizers: Nicholas Watson, nwatson@fas.harvard.edu; and Elaine Treharne, treharne@stanford.edu
Format: Position Papers

After 1200, Old English ceased being widely copied. The Tremulous Hand of Worcester is the latest figure known to have studied the language closely until the mid sixteenth century. What happened in between? Did readers and writers of insular French, Middle English, or Anglo-Latin care about and talk about Old English? If so, why did they care and how did they express their interest? Were early modern Anglo-Saxonists aware of having predecessors? This panel calls for short position papers exploring answers to these question using as many kinds of evidence as possible: manuscript glosses, chronicles, legal texts, writings on language and translation, and more. 

Note: Session 6, "Metrolingualism," in the Chaucer Abroad thread, is offered in coordination with Language Contacts.

 

THREAD 5: MAKING THE TEXT
Organizers: Thomas Goodmann, tgoodmann@miami.edu; Elizabeth Scala, scala@austin.utexas.edu

35. Loving and Hating Chaucer in the Twenty-First Century
Organizer: Patricia Clare Ingham, pingham@indiana.edu
Format: Position Papers

This session is a paired inquiry with session 2 in Thread 1: "Chaucer Abroad: Who Owns Chaucer Now?”
Acknowledging exciting engagements with proliferating adaptations of Chaucer worldwide, this session looks inward, seeking interrogations of and challenges to Chaucer’s place at the center of the Middle English (and perhaps late-medieval) canon.  As we explore ways in which Chaucer authorizes Middle English studies, is it time—or too late—to ask (again) about de-centering the canon? Should we keep on loving Chaucer as the preeminent textual maker, or hate him for overshadowing the diversity and range of Middle English (medieval?) textuality? Papers, manifestos, essays, polemics, or persuasions welcome, as we assess the benefits and/or liabilities of keeping Chaucer and his legacy as the authorial, textual, canonical, or aesthetic center of the field.

36. In the Eye of the Beholder?: Perfecting and Completing Medieval Manuscripts and Early Printed Books
Organizer: Martha Driver, mdriver@pace.edu
Format: Paper Panel

This session explores medieval manuscripts and/or early printed books in a state of mobility, moving from loss to “perfection.” Examples might include manuscripts with pages that are not original or where illuminations have been inserted or restored, as is the case in Cambridge Gg.4.27, which includes Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, and in Morgan M. 126, Gower’s Confessio Amantis, among others; chronicles and guildhall records that are “perfected” over time with pages added to fill out the history or record long after the original scribes or writers are gone; or early printed books filled out with facsimile pages or with leaves from other editions by the same printer (frequent in Caxton editions). Discussion of perfected copies will open to a larger consideration of what precisely constitutes a book, along with questions of making and reception.

37. Is There a Text for This Class?  Editing Chaucer Now
Organizer: Elizabeth Scala, scala@austin.utexas.edu
Format: Position Papers

This session seeks position papers on current editorial efforts to produce texts of Chaucer for the classroom and for critical reference, and it invites participants to think about why the texts of Chaucer’s writings do not attract anything like the vibrant variety of editorial and publishing support given to those of Shakespeare.

38. Manuscript and the Print Devolution
Organizer: Zachary Hines, zhines@utexas.edu
Format: Lightning Talks

Recent scholarship on late-medieval manuscript production has revealed a complex and vibrant network of scribes, illuminators, and workshops, booksellers and readers—a culture that persists after the arrival of Caxton’s press to England in 1476. This session explores the role of the manuscript in the increasingly mechanized literary world of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. It theorizes the notion of a “print devolution,” a paradoxical increase in the authority, desirability, and production of manuscript books after the advent of print. Resisting accounts that simply chart the demise of the manuscript, this session explores the complexities and complications of a historical moment where these purportedly disparate forms coexisted.

39. Mapping London Textual Production
Organizer: Lawrence Warner, lawrence.warner@kcl.ac.uk
Format: Paper Panel

The institutions of medieval London and its surrounds—the Guildhall, the Privy Seal, the Livery Companies, the Priory of St. Mary Overie, etc.—have played increasingly important roles in recent accounts of the careers of Chaucer, Gower, Langland, Hoccleve, and other authors, and of the transmission of their works. This panel invites papers reconsidering the role of London's institutions in our assessment of Middle English literature. Suggested topics might include: archival discoveries, reassessments of current work on such topics, the relationship between "literary" and governmental/legal modes of textual production, and what difference all this makes to Middle English studies.

40. Scribes and the Grammar of Medieval Pages
Organizers: Heather Blatt, hblatt@fiu.edu; Sarah Noonan, sarahloleet@gmail.com; Daniel Wakelin, daniel.wakelin@ell.ox.ac.uk
Format: Seminar

Nearly forty years ago, Doyle and Parkes observed that a work’s “layout and decoration function like punctuation” since they guide the reader’s interaction with the text. This recognition continues to encourage the reevaluation of scribal acts, as such features are often altered—or duplicated by design—with each recopying. This seminar explores how we might define the grammatical function of rubrication, script hierarchies, paraph marks, initials, etc., either within a single manuscript or across a range of manuscripts. Did communities develop their own scribal “grammars” of layout and/or decoration? Did they share these communicative systems through copying, or was each scribal utterance constitutive of a new idiolectical grammar? How might the fields of semiotics and linguistics, or others, help explain how scribes “made” the texts they copied out, and/or to theorize the scribal act more broadly?

41. Texting in Class: What Do You Use? What Do You Want? What Do We Need?
Organizer: Thomas Goodmann, tgoodmann@miami.edu
Format: Lightning Talks

This session seeks focused presentations on texts for teaching and citing Middle English sources and the other contemporary literatures of later medieval England, including Chaucer, of course. Is the demise of the Riverside indicative of deep challenges to the field, or merely a pedagogical inconvenience—and so for Middle English anthologies, and Middle English courses, more broadly? Heretical positions encouraged: is it time to address Chaucer and Middle English texts for the twenty-first century, including respelled texts and translations? Provocations addressing changes, choices, and challenges are welcome: what will be the teaching texts and/or the editions of reference in 2050?

42. Transcription Now
Organizer: Daniel Wakelin, daniel.wakelin@ell.ox.ac.uk
Format: Paper Panel

Medieval literary study relies on transcription, yet we seldom reflect on or esteem it. It has been done by unacknowledged Victorian women, by untenured postdocs on professors’ grants, or by workers in the developing world building corpora of big data. Is it menial drudgery or an intellectual achievement? Is the process itself enlightening, or just a means to an end? Do digital methods offer more accuracy? Or does transcribing depend on interpretation for solving textual cruces, recognizing form, choosing the limits of the text? Why reproduce some letterforms but not others? Are abbreviations meaningful or expendable—expandable? And transcription seems like a quest for sameness, but it implies transferral, transition, difference. Need it always entail “accuracy”—and accuracy in what? Might “mistranscription,” like “mistranslation,” be rewarding too?

43. Uncritical Editions
Organizer: Megan Cook, mlcook@colby.edu
Format: Paper Panel

This panel will explore an alternative history of Middle English in print by foregrounding texts that fail to conform to critical norms. Participants might consider editions of Chaucer and other Middle English writers produced before the advent of modern textual theory; work that employs alternative or outdated editorial practices and methods; or adaptations, abridgments, and teaching editions that alter the received text without explicit textual rationale. What role does this oft-elided editorial work play in making the Middle English texts that we read, edit, and interpret today? What (if any) is the critical significance of uncritical editions?

 

THREAD 6: MIDDLE ENGLISH LITERATURE AT SCALE
Organizer: Catherine Sanok, sanok@umich.edu

44. Allegorical Scale
Organizers: Katharine Breen, khbreen@northwestern.edu; Carolynn Van Dyke, vandykec@lafayette.edu
Format: Paper Panel

Allegory is, in a very basic sense, a device for manipulating scale. At the beginning of Boethius’  Consolation of Philosophy, Lady Philosophy literally changes scale, at some times “keep[ing] herself within common mortal limits” while at others “seem[ing] to strike at the heavens with the crown of her head” and even “pierc[ing] heaven itself.” In doing so, she figures the way in which allegorical reading and composition link interpersonal interactions, human emotions and, in many cases, closely observed mimetic detail to broader moral, political, and philosophical problems. This panel welcomes discussions of the relationship between allegory and scale ranging from close readings of particular figures to broader considerations of the workings of allegorical scale as such. To what extent is it useful to think about allegory as a characteristically medieval technology for adjusting the scale at which we read and think?

45. Cosmic Scale
Organizer: Kara Gaston, kara.gaston@utoronto.ca
Format: Paper Panel

Astronomy mediates between the very large and the very small. Troilus laughs at “this litel spot of erthe,” as seen from the heavens. But an astrolabe places the celestial sphere in the palm of one’s hand. Astronomical tools such as the Alphonsine Tables could calculate up to 80,000 years’ worth of celestial movements, but the Clerk of Orleans uses them to find the exact moment that Brittany’s black rocks are likely to be hidden. This panel welcomes papers that use astronomy to think about scale. How can astronomy help us understand literature that mediates or moves between vastly different scales? Does astronomy supply medieval poets with a language for thinking about scale? If it is possible to read on a cosmic scale, can we also see the stars on a literary scale? 

46. Imagined Pasts and Possible Futures
Organizer: Jordan Zweck, jlzweck@wisc.edu
Format: Paper Panel

This session invites papers exploring the long temporal scale of the medieval literary imagination, and especially the ways in which medieval cultures imagined their own pasts. Papers might consider a work featuring time travel or a long internal temporal scale, such as legends of the Seven Sleepers, or texts that revisit England’s pre-Conquest past (such as St. Erkenwald or perhaps Athelston). In examining how medieval texts memorialize the past and imagine the future, we might uncover how medieval peoples conceived of time, memory, the archive, and periods.

47. Inhabiting Nonhuman Times
Organizer: Susan Crane, susan.crane@columbia.edu
Format: Seminar

In medieval thought, linear human lifetimes unfolding from birth to death were also marked by nonhuman times, such as the cyclical seasons, the apparently timeless continuity of species and ecosystems, the chaotic turns of Fortune’s wheel. These intersecting times offer an ecosystemic challenge to thinking time, decentering the human in favor of a broader view of creaturely life. For example, what is the temporality of a saint’s restoration of prelapsarian peace among the creatures? In Piers Plowman, why do agricultural and social processes so persistently intersect?  In Chaucer's Knight's Tale, do the ships Mars burns, the towers Saturn pulls down, and the inspirited grove destroyed for Arcite’s pyre imagine the material world to be within the purview of Fortune and Providence? Why does the Gawain poet choose to narrate Sir Gawain's last year of life as a sequence of four seasons?

48. Lyric Scale
Organizer: Daniel Birkholz, birkholz@austin.utexas.edu
Format: Lightning Talks

Literary geography has taken hold as a subfield methodology, so far as narrative goes. To inquire into “lyric scale,” however, is to invite paradox, as lyric is slight and elusive; except when it is ponderous and institutional; or simultaneously intimate and universalist; in-the-moment and eschatological; doctrinal and playful. The signature brevity of the form (if it is a form) has made lyric texts prime targets for anthology compilation. Yet individual exemplars prove inclined and able to escape from such programs of interpretive cooptation. Lyricality itself, scholars agree, is clearly a post-medieval invention. So what balances the scales enough to justify treatment? All textual locations, critical orientations, and manifestations of lyric scale welcome.

49. Scale Jumping
Organizer: Matthew Boyd Goldie, mgoldie@rider.edu
Format: Paper Panel

Scale jumping in geography is when a social or other phenomenon jumps from a small sphere of influence to a much larger one or vice versa. The power of scale jumping is that small events can affect large ones, or a small or large phenomenon is exposed as limited because of its scale. The simple juxtaposition of things of vastly different sizes also implies a distinct kind of metonymy or transumptio that is similar to scale jumping. Papers are sought that examine the nature and effects of scale jumping in scientific, literary, historical, and artistic works.

50. Scales of Performance
Organizer: Emma Lipton, liptone@missouri.edu
Format: Paper Panel

This session invites considerations of the role of practices, movements and bodies in the construction of spatial and temporal scale. Building on David Harvey’s argument that concepts of space are simultaneously material and imagined and that they are “necessarily created through material practices and processes,” this panel seeks to explore simultaneities, disjunctions and fluidities of scale in performance. For example, the processional staging of late medieval civic religious drama emphasizes the continual interaction between the imaginary fictional spaces of the pageants on one hand and the material spaces of the pageant wagons and the city streets on the other, while these fleeting moments of dramatic performance signal and create sacred and civic history. Papers on all aspects of performance, scale, and Middle English literature are welcome.

51. What Time Is It?: Non-normative Temporalities
Organizer: Miriamne Ara Krummel, mkrummel1@udayton.edu
Format: Position Papers

Peter Travis concluded a 1997 essay with the suggestively ironic remark, “one of these days we may indeed arrive at an adequate understanding of time.” While in 2017 we still may not be faced with “an adequate understanding of time” given time’s ultimately elusive nature, we have done much over the past twenty years to theorize temporality. We acknowledge that visions of time are relative and dependent upon the lens of the viewer, who may be outside the reigning heteronormative temporality. Queer studies and queer temporality have ultimately introduced consideration of an array of Other voices whose position in and out of standard time is complicated by their racial, religious, able-bodied, gendered/sexed, and socio-economic différance. This session invites papers that take a position on how temporal Others evoke non-normative ways of seeing that may reshape our understanding of temporal scale(s).

 

INDEPENDENT SESSIONS

52. Affect Matters: Historicizing Feeling in the Age of Chaucer
Organizers: Glenn Burger, gburger@gc.cuny.edu; Holly A. Crocker, hcrocker@mailbox.sc.edu
Format: Paper Panel

In this session we seek to historicize medieval affect. Papers might consider the following questions:  Is there a specifically Chaucerian affect that develops through Chaucer’s particular engagements with the genres of dream vision and fin amor, or through the “impersonated artistry” of The Canterbury Tales, or in the later construction of “Father Chaucer” by English and Scottish poets following him? What are the relationships between form and affect in Chaucer’s poetry and in that of his contemporaries? To what extent are objects and material contexts crucial for affective interaction in late medieval poetry? What are the mutually constitutive relationships between gender and affect in late medieval poetry? How does affect matter in the construction of religious identity; can we speak of a specifically Jewish or Muslim affect?

53. The Ars Moriendi and Practices of Care
Organizers: Karl Steel, KSteel@brooklyn.cuny.edu; Ashbv Kinch, ashkinch@gmail.com
Format: Lightning Talks

This session aims to think of death as something other than a contest of power, a limit of meaning, a zone in which sovereignty plays out, or a dispersal of the self within absolute expenditure. It aims to circumvent thinking about death that has dominated work inspired by Hegel, Bataille, and biopolitics, and to avoid work that presents death as a grim struggle of the self against an indifferent world. This session therefore invites papers that consider medieval death practices in terms of community, hospice, and the management of shared vulnerability. It hopes to collect papers that are both "traditionally" archival and speculatively philosophical.

54. Bodleian Library MS Fairfax 16
Organizer: Simon Meecham-Jones, stmj2@cam.ac.uk
Format: Paper Panel

Bodleian Library MS Fairfax 16 is one of the most influential witnesses of Chaucer’s earlier poetry, and contains as well a sequence of poems possibly by Charles d’Orléans, or possibly (in part) written in imitation of Charles’s work by contemporaries, perhaps including the Duke of Suffolk. This session invites papers that consider the light Fairfax 16 sheds on such matters as the circulation and reception of the Book of the Duchess and the House of Fame in the fifteenth century, the role of noble and gentry patronage (in particular that of the Stanley family) in the circulation of Chaucerian manuscripts, and the importance of Charles in the development of poetry at this time or, more broadly, the relationship of the English and French poetic traditions at a time when the shift away from Insular French for administrative purposes was becoming firmly established.

55. Chaucer and Rape: New Directions
Organizer: Carissa M. Harris, carissa.harris@temple.edu
Format: Lightning Talks

This session seeks papers focusing on representations of sexual violence in Chaucer’s poetry. Chaucer’s literary engagement with rape is both persistent and nuanced, further complicated by his involvement in Cecily Chaumpaigne’s 1380 raptus case, and this session will feature papers that examine that engagement in innovative ways. Speakers can contextualize Chaucer’s treatment of rape within medieval legal or historical discourses; they can examine his work in conversation with other works about sexual violence, like pastourelles; or they can discuss productive ways of teaching Chaucer’s rape texts in the college classroom. This session particularly welcomes new work linking sexual violence in Chaucerian texts to contemporary issues like campus sexual violence, alcohol-facilitated sexual assault, and anti-rape education efforts.

56. Chaucer and Transgender Studies
Organizer: Ruth Evans, revans19@slu.edu
Format: Lightning Talks

Gender transformation is a recurrent motif in medieval literature and culture, from retellings of Ovid’s Metamorphoses to transgender saints to John/Eleanor Rykener’s late fourteenth-century sexual performance “as a woman.” What is distinctive about medieval trans narratives? How do they challenge contemporary models of gender and sexual identity? How does trans intersect with other categories, such as disability? What models—for example, “transgender time”—do we use to think about trans in the past? Participants are all asked to address, however briefly, an overarching question: what difference does it make to our reading of texts by Chaucer and those of his age to deploy transgender as a category of analysis?

57. Chaucer’s Friars
Organizer: Neil Cartlidge, cartlidgeneil@me.com
Format: Paper Panel

According to Chaucer’s Summoner, medieval friars were not just verminous (“as bees”), but also extremely numerous (“twenty thousand freres on a route”). There is no doubt that the friars played a prominent role in the literary/intellectual culture of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, and Chaucer seems to have been heavily indebted to a number of particular fraternal writers—but also to traditions of satirizing friars, to the extent that his relationship with them might be seen as a case of biting “the hand that fed him” (as R. A. Pratt put it). This session invites reconsideration of any aspect of Chaucer’s representation of, and/or response to, friars and fraternal culture(s).

58. Chaucer in the Secondary School Curriculum?
Organizers: Candace Barrington, BarringtonC@ccsu.edu; Kara Crawford, crawfordk@bishops.com
Format: Position Papers

Discussions of how Chaucer can be (and has been) successfully brought into secondary-school classrooms assume that Chaucer should be present in those classrooms. But should he? This session offers a provocation to lead off the pedagogical conversation at NCS, inviting position papers that address such questions as whether the rewards (to students and to teachers) of teaching Chaucer are worth dealing with such barriers as the use of present-day English editions, possible censorship, and a crowded curriculum. Can high school teachers justify adding another dead white male author to the reading list? If there are benefits to introducing students to Chaucer and his Tales, what are they? Are there important reasons why it is predominantly higher education classrooms that "own" Chaucer? Papers will not sugarcoat the obstacles facing teaching in the high-school classroom but will deal with them forthrightly and head-on.

59. Does Formalism Need Poetry?
Organizer: Ingrid Nelson, inelson@amherst.edu
Format: Position Papers

The inception of formalist methods in literary studies ("practical criticism" and "new criticism") in the early twentieth century made lyric poetry a privileged object of analysis. Yet Caroline Levine's influential Forms: Whole, Rhythm, Hierarchy, Network (2015) not only proposes a new set of terms of art for formalism but also asserts the primacy of novels in formalist studies, even as other disciplines take formal approaches to a variety of media. What kinds of "affordances," to use Levine's term, do medieval forms offer to new formalisms? Within this critical landscape, should formalism still take poetry as a primary object of study? This panel invites position papers that take up the question in its title by engaging with medieval texts, art, disciplinary history, manuscript studies, or any other topics pertaining to formalism.

60. Dreams and the Scientific Imagination
Organizer: Charlotte Rudman, charlotte.rudman@kcl.ac.uk
Format: Paper Panel

This session invites papers that engage with current approaches to Chaucer's use of science in his dream vision corpus, examining how Chaucer’s knowledge of physics, metaphysics and the study of natural phenomena contributes to his literary works. The connections between science, technology and the imagination in medieval literary culture have long been of interest in Chaucer studies, and attention to these topics has only intensified in recent years. Papers will investigate the ways in which Chaucer’s scientific learning is imaginatively presented in his fiction. How does Chaucer draw upon Aquinas’s Commentary on the Metaphysics of Aristotle creatively in his dream vision poetry, for example? How does he apply or even recreate Aristotelian science?

61. Feminism “In Felaweshipe:” Modern Theories for Medieval Texts
Organizer: Samantha Seal, Samantha.Seal@unh.edu
Format: Lightning Talks

Feminism has the distinction of being somewhat older than some of its theoretical peers. Do newer theoretical innovations in Medieval Studies (ecocriticism, disability studies, affect theory, digital humanities, etc.) necessitate a scholarly competition with feminism, or do they enable a beneficial cooperation? How can Medieval Studies embrace new opportunities for theoretical engagement without simultaneously reifying new intellectual boundaries? This panel seeks papers that bring together feminism with at least one other theoretical model (not limited to those suggested above). Of particular interest are papers that demonstrate the value and the challenges inherent in feminist interdisciplinarity, and/or engage in a larger conversation about feminism’s place in an intellectually diverse future.

62. Forms of Middle English Prayer
Organizers: Taylor Cowdery, cowdery@email.unc.edu; Megan Murton, murton@cua.edu
Format: Paper Panel

The history of Middle English lyric is indivisible from the history of prayer. Prayers for spiritual clarity resemble lyrics seeking affective catharsis, while Middle English poets are as likely to call for saintly intercession as to beg a patron’s assistance. This panel aims to explore the intersection of these two modes of language performance and to consider how their kinship might provide insight into broader questions of poetics and religion in later medieval literature. We welcome papers that consider any aspect of the relationship between prayer and lyric, but the following questions might serve as a starting point. To what extent do prayer and lyric share a common style, voice, form, or affect? Is Middle English “prayere” or “orisoun” a form distinct from Latin “oratio” or French “preiere”? Finally, is it more useful to distinguish between “secular” and “sacred” poetics in Middle English lyric or to dissolve this distinction?

63. ‘In the beginning, She Was’: Feminizing Chaucer's Authority
Organizers: Liz Herbert McAvoy, e.mcavoy@swansea.ac.uk ; Roberta Magnani, r.magnani@swansea.ac.uk
Format: Lightning Talks

The complex lineage of Chaucer’s works has been subject to much scholarly scrutiny, with the acknowledged sources of Chaucer’s works and manuscripts gesturing towards a variety of male auctoritates. However, a recent special issue of The Chaucer Review, focusing on women’s relation to the literary canon, suggests that reconsideration of the influence of female-coded modes of knowledge, whether intellectual, spiritual or scientific, is now timely and urgent. We therefore invite short papers engaging with innovative, more capacious ways of accounting for the formation of the English canon at the time of Chaucer—papers that acknowledge female-coded epistemologies and the much neglected contribution of women’s piety and literacy to Chaucer’s intellectual landscape and that thereby open up our understanding of processes of canon formation beyond traditional patrilineal lines of transmission.

64. Institutional Affects
Organizers: Thomas A. Prendergast, tprendergast@wooster.edu; Stephanie Trigg, sjtrigg@unimelb.edu.au
Format: Position Papers

We invite reflections on the role of affects and emotions in our response to institutions in the broad fields of medieval studies and medievalism studies. In both arenas relationships with institutions are often as deeply emotional as they are intellectual. We think of Hoccleve in the office of the Privy Seal, or Margery Kempe’s struggles with priests and bishops, or medieval and modern scholars negotiating the demands and privileges of the university and the church; even the sometimes vexed relationship between medieval studies and medievalism in the modern academy. How do/can we read historical emotion and affect vis-à-vis institutions? How does/should emotion affect our work as medieval scholars?

65. Living Research: Drama and Performance in Practice
Proposer: Matthew Sergi, University of Toronto, matthew.sergi@utoronto.ca
Format: Lightning Talks

The two live dramatic productions that Toronto’s PLS brought to NCS 2016 — The Pride of Life and an impromptu site-specific Mankind — brought up a number of questions regarding the way that live production of late medieval plays might relate to the production of academic research in the field, whether or not it constitutes research in itself. This panel invites respondents to report on live productions of early plays or live performances/readings of any early text, emphasizing performances that have reached beyond campus; these short reports will be followed by an open discussion.

66. Loneliness and Solitude in Chaucer
Organizers: Will Rogers, youngman@ulm.edu; Chris Roman, croman2@kent.edu
Format: Paper Panel

Although Chaucer’s works are often marked by a spirit of conviviality and community, there are many moments in his texts where Chaucer the narrator, the pilgrims, or the figures in his dream visions find themselves alone. For this session, we would like to see papers that parse what it means to be alone or lonely in Chaucer’s works. Considering many of us as medievalists work alone, thinking about solitude and loneliness in the works of a poet who is not frequently considered outside the frame of “Social Chaucer” can help to tie our modern identities as medievalists to moments where community in Chaucer breaks down or is simply nonexistent. Finally, this session offers space to think through how moments of loneliness or of solitude reflect Chaucer’s exploration of the nature of emotions, the foundations of sexualities and/or gender, and the dimensions of poetic making, as collaboration or solo activity.

67. Making Room for Chaucer in Secondary Schools
Organizer: Lee Read, ladybeall@yahoo.com; Jessica Rezunyk, jrezunyk@gmail.com
Format: Seminar

How can we make space for medieval literature in secondary school classrooms where literary content is constantly shrinking? There is strong evidence that students who study Chaucer in high school are more likely to take medieval studies classes in college. Seminar participants will examine data on secondary schools that teach Chaucer and investigate strategies to encourage more schools to follow suit. Which curricula encourage the study of literature prior to 1600 and how do they incorporate Chaucer into the broad literary surveys typical of high school? How do academically rigorous testing programs (AP and IB) as well as high stakes testing (PARCC and Smarter Balanced) impact curricular content? What role does translation play in teaching Chaucer to high school students? And how do teacher education programs play a role in fostering or dismissing the belief that Chaucer is well-suited for high-school curricula?

68. The Meaning of Violence
Organizer: Robert Epstein, REpstein@fairfield.edu
Format: Paper Panel

Scholarship has become accustomed to addressing “symbolic violence”—according to Bourdieu, “that form of domination which... is only exerted through the communication in which it is disguised”—but of course medieval literature is replete with depictions of physical violence as well. This violence is also the subject of contested history; Steven Pinker, for instance, has recently argued, in a kind of evolutionary-psychology updating of Norbert Elias, that humankind is on a perpetual progression upward from greater to lesser violence. This session seeks papers on violence in Middle English literature: its representation, its significance, its relationship to symbolic power and domination, its relation to meaning-making and communication, or the competing ways in which it is interpreted, justified, or suppressed.

69. Misogynies: Medieval and Modern
Organizer: Nicole Sidhu, sidhun@ecu.edu
Format: Lightning Talks

As the recent American election campaign attests, misogyny—with its capacity to characterize powerful women as shrews and bitches and thereby undermine their political legitimacy—remains a significant political force. In media and popular culture, characterizations of women as jealous, lying, sex-hungry sluts abound. Scholars of the Middle Ages know that these notions have a long history in the West. This session invites short papers that explore the connections between modern and medieval misogynies and that consider how medieval feminist scholarship can contribute to an understanding of misogyny and its power in the twenty-first century.​

70. New Ideas in Manuscript Studies
Organizer: Thomas Farrell, tom.farrell@stetson.edu
Format: Paper Panel

Definition of the "new field" of manuscript studies inaugurated by Doyle and Parkes in 1978 (Kerby-Fulton et al.) remains a process: the study of manuscripts has generated evidence about scribes, communities of scribes and readers, book producers, interactions between authors and scribes, and audience reception of texts; those concerns now overlap in discussions of evidence for scribal attribution, the readership of medieval texts, loci of textual transmission, editorial practice, and other issues. This session invites discussion of newly articulated evidence and newly recognized overlaps in manuscript study: descriptions of the as-yet unexplored ways in which their evidence can generate knowledge about medieval textual production.

71. Newer Materialisms
Organizer: Taylor Cowdery, cowdery@email.unc.edu
Format: Paper Panel

Since the publication of Jane Bennett’s Vibrant Matter in 2010, medieval studies has witnessed an explosion of debate around the question of the ontology and agency of physical stuff in the Middle Ages. Five years after Bennett’s book, and roughly ten years after Speculative Realism, this panel aims to reassess the place of New Materialism within medieval studies. We welcome any abstracts that consider New Materialism as a field, but particularly welcome are papers that focus on its relation to other critical methodologies, on its historicity and/or historical roots, and on its possible futures. What was New Materialism before, and what is it now? What schisms exist within the field of New Materialism, as broadly defined? And to what extent has New Materialism learned from the critiques of other subfields—in particular, from historicist and Marxist critiques?

72. Parliament, Institutions, Theory: New Cases for Literature and the Law
Organizers: Brantley Bryant, brantley.bryant@sonoma.edu; Jonathan Forbes, jforbes@umail.ucsb.edu
Format: Lightning Talks

Late medieval literature intertwines with institutions. Pursuing the commitments of literary texts often leads to parliament, chancery, or exchequer and to their attendant political and legal processes. Historicist approaches have richly sustained study of these intersections. This panel, however, seeks contributions that engage with legal and institutional history, but offer emergent perspectives through theoretical approaches often unpaired with historicist work. For example, what does psychoanalysis as speech theory teach us about political debate? How might ecocriticism attend to the spaces in which the law was practiced? Where’s affect in constitutional history? Participants will deliver brief talks that showcase the contributions that theoretical approaches to the law can make to the study of legal and political institutions or to documentary culture in late medieval England.

73. Practicing Patience in the Middle Ages
Organizer: Tara Williams, Tara.Williams@oregonstate.edu
Format: Lightning Talks

Patience is a complex and even paradoxical virtue. It intersects with agency and, to borrow Sara Ahmed’s term, willfulness, but it is also defined by restraint. It can describe an immediate response and/or a sustained practice. It involves affect as well as intellect. It exists on a continuum (someone can have no, little, or much patience), yet it exhibits a tipping point (when it runs out or is lost). This session invites short papers exploring the nature of medieval patience and its performance in secular and devotional contexts.    

74. Reimagining Invention
Organizer: Steele Nowlin, snowlin@hsc.edu
Format: Lightning Talks

This session welcomes papers that work to reimagine our understanding of concepts of invention in late medieval writing. While papers might of course consider invention in the sense of rhetorical inventio, this session particularly invites papers that can help us deepen, expand, or otherwise reconceptualize the way in which late medieval writers and texts variously address, represent, or enact the processes by which poetry or prose comes into being. In short, how might late medieval texts encourage us to consider “invention” more broadly? Papers might examine questions of (re)definition (what is, or was, invention?); terminology (what exactly is involved in a term like fyndyng, for example?); theory (what aspects of contemporary theory might help us productively reconceptualize invention?); meta-representation (how do writers depict processes of invention in texts?); pedagogy (how might a reimagined understanding of medieval invention help us reconsider our own approaches to teaching writing?); and other related questions.

75. The Scandalous Politics and Media of the late Middle Ages: A Time “not without some scandall”
Organizer: Geoffrey Gust, Geoffrey.Gust@stockton.edu
Format: Paper Panel

Today, public scandals are everywhere, from the title of a popular television series to TMZ, social media, and the front-page news. According to the OED, the term “scandal” was coined in English as early as the thirteenth century, but it appears that the word was not widely utilized until the late sixteenth century—although the idea itself certainly was current in the age of Chaucer. This session is intended to help fill this historical gap through presentations that offer other late medieval articulations, configurations, and theorizations of what we now recognize as scandals or the scandalous. Moving beyond issues of philology, the session especially invites papers focusing on political and religious controversies, and seeks to answer the following theoretical question: in a period defined by far different forms of “media” and popular discourse, how (and to what ends) were scandals conceptualized, publicized, reported, viewed, and appropriated in the late Middle Ages?

76. Scientia, Sapientia, et Pedagogia
Organizers: Nicole D. Smith, nicole.smith@unt.edu; Moira Fitzgibbons, moira.fitzgibbons@marist.edu
Format: Lightning Talks

From Aristotle through Augustine and Aquinas, scientia (head knowledge) and sapientia (heart knowledge) have been understood as important, and often mutually exclusive, modalities of knowledge. This session invites lightning talks that explore the intersection of the two, particularly as they emerge in pedagogical theory and practice extending from the Middle Ages to the present day. How do writers of lyrics on the Passion provide their audiences with concrete information even as they prioritize affect and a wisdom of the heart? How do prose confessional manuals appeal both to individual devotion and communal ways of knowing (literally, con-science) as part of their teaching strategies? And what might be the best strategies for engaging with emotional and intellectual responses to medieval literature, on the part of both our students and ourselves? By addressing such questions, this session highlights the multiple literacies and ways of knowing drawn upon by medieval and modern writers, readers, and educators.

77. Scribal Poetics
Organizers: Aditi Nafde, Aditi.Nafde@newcastle.ac.uk; Jenni Nuttall, jennifer.nuttall@seh.ox.ac.uk
Format: Lightning Talks

Daniel Wakelin’s 2014 study of scribal correction demonstrated that scribal activity is a rich and provocative source of information about late medieval poetics. Where studies of layout, compilation, and punctuation have examined scribes’ understanding of a text’s meaning or genre, the focus has less often been on scribes’ interpretation of its poetic form—on “scribal poetics” (as named by Ralph Hanna in Pursuing History), the embodiment of knowledge (or misapprehensions) about poetry and its techniques in codicological form. To bring together and stimulate further research in this field, we invite short talks on what scribal decision-making and/or scribal mistake-making reveal about poetic form by focusing, for example, on units of verse (the line, the stanza); the art of verse-punctuation; paraphs, bracketing, bracing, and other elements of verse mise-en-page; or the scribal handling of meter, alliteration and rhyme.

78. The Squire and His Tale: “Ernest” or “Game”?
Organizer: Bobby Meyer-Lee
Format: Position Papers

The Squire’s Tale is the poster child for the historical variability of Chaucer reception. Treasured by Milton and Spenser, the tale was near universally considered to be either a staged or actual failure through several decades in the middle of the twentieth century. More recent work exploring the tale’s psychological, cultural, social, environmental, and geopolitical implications has upended that consensus, yet doubt about its “high seriousness” remains, even in some of this very work. This session seeks papers that take new approaches in formulating an answer to the question posed by the session’s title.

79. Surveillance
Organizer: Sylvia Tomasch, stomasch@hunter.cuny.edu
Format: Paper Panel

Although surveillance is increasingly intrusive in our own lives, it's hardly a new phenomenon or concern. Medieval surveillance occurred pre-digitally, but various technologies, strategies, and social/political/religious relations made it possible, even sometimes imperative.  Considerations of surveillance in a wide range of times, places, languages, and texts are particularly encouraged. Presentations might consider: What are some of the ways surveillant processes occurred in the Middle Ages? What are some of the ways the (post-modern) present surveils the medieval past? What terms or concepts from contemporary Surveillance Studies are useful for thinking about surveillance in the Middle Ages?

80. Teaching Chaucer and the Power of Telling Stories
Organizer: Mark Randolph, mrandolph@greenhillsschool.org
Format: Seminar 

Storytelling, as Jonathan Gottschalk argues in The Story-Telling Animal, represents a desire to negotiate between what we cannot know and what we wish to manage: it is, he claims, an evolutionary strategy. The Canterbury Tales, particularly its frame, constructs us as audiences of stories that will gather us together in a community. In doing so it prompts us to tell our own stories, which will lead to new communities forming and thus new opportunities for reaching Canterbury Cathedral and redemption. This session welcomes presentations on pedagogical approaches that use the Tales to generate (particularly among secondary-school students) modes of storytelling that re-imagine, redefine and recreate both the individual and the community.

81. Wheels and Fire: Ideas of Language in Medieval Literature
Organizer: David Coley, david_coley@sfu.ca
Format: Lightning Talks

From wicker houses to twittering birds to writing on the wall, Chaucer’s poetry is awash in images, metaphors, and representations of language both ciphered and overt. Indeed, The Canterbury Tales might be called a thought experiment in creating, transmitting and receiving stories, a work fundamentally about the potential and the limitations of speech and writing. This session is not a linguistics session (though grammar and linguistics may be discussed). Instead, it steps back from linguistics itself to consider how medieval writers understood language to work, how they described and represented it, and how such understandings were processed in their work. Topics could include metaphors used for language; images of reading, writing, and speaking in medieval works; explicit versus implicit concepts of language; noise, sound, and music as language.

Mentorship Program

The NCS Trustees warmly invite all members of the Society to participate, if they wish, in the second iteration of a mentoring program (begun at the London Congress in 2016) at the upcoming Toronto Congress in July 2018, either as a mentor or as a mentee. The scheme is designed to help graduate students and anyone new to the Society to meet more established scholars in order to feel welcomed and supported during the congress, and also to make or develop professional contacts. We especially welcome participation by students and scholars of historically underrepresented groups. Those who would like to receive mentoring or serve as a mentor should register online using the form below. Shazia Jagot (s.jagot@surrey.ac.uk) Sierra Lomuto (lomuto@sas.upenn.edu), and Tom Hahn (thomas.hahn@rochester.edu) will coordinate the exchanges for 2018.

The intent of the mentorship exchanges is for experienced scholars (at any stage of their career, including senior graduate students) to welcome and connect with newer members of the Society and to help facilitate social and professional interaction. In particular, NCS recognizes documented gaps in the graduate recruiting, tenure-track hiring, and promotion and tenure reception of underrepresented groups within academia; the Society is therefore especially eager to encourage first-generation students, medievalists of color, trans and Gender Non-conforming students and scholars, and other members historically underrepresented in higher education to participate in the mentorship program. 

Like many NCS members, we are aware of and troubled by the ways in which the medieval period is currently being used for racist ends, for example by the alt-right and associated groups. It is important for all of us in medieval studies to take active stock of this and to ponder effective and lasting responses to these issues. Mentors and mentees might wish to raise the topic in the course of their exchanges at the Congress:  here are some resources to help inform that conversation:

Medievalists of Color - medievalistsofcolor.com
Race and Medieval Studies: A Partial Bibliography - https://docs.google.com/document/d/18JClsma1BMKYCxvgeWqwPej3ZSCrQXlAlXbL0CdqWmE/edit
TEAMS Featured Lesson Resource Page on Race, Racism and the Middle Ages (compiled by Carol L. Robinson) - https://teams-medieval.org/?page_id=76

The initial extent of the commitment would be for mentees and mentors to meet for a conversation at an agreed-upon time during the conference in question. The continuation of the mentor relationship after the conference is at the discretion of the parties involved.

We will try to make the best match based upon the information provided below. Please do mention specific requests that are not covered: we are unlikely to have thought of everything! If any mentor would be willing to lead a group for dinner one evening at the congress, please could you let us know under ‘Other’?

THE SURVEY IS NOW CLOSED. 

DEADLINE TO SUBMIT: JUNE 20, 2018

 

Wondering where to meet? Here are some suggestions:

RESTAURANTS AND BARS WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

Establishments marked with an asterisk (*) are wheelchair accessible. Those marked with two asterisks (**) are partially accessible and details are provided.

Bar Mercurio, 270 Bloor Street West (Italian)

(The) Bedford Academy*, 36 Prince Arthur Avenue (pub fare)

Dynasty Chinese Cuisine, 69 Yorkville Avenue  (Dim Sum Daily)

Harbord House, 150 Harbord Street (pub fare)

Her Father’s Cider, 119 Harbord Street (locally sourced cider and food)

Harvest Kitchen, 124 Harbord Street, (locally sourced, good for vegetarians)

Host Fine Indian Cuisine, 14 Prince Arthur Avenue (Indian)

Il Posto, 148 Yorkville Avenue (Italian)

La Societe, 131 Bloor Street West (French Bistro)

Morton’s of Chicago Steakhouse*, Park Hyatt Hotel, 4 Avenue Road (American)

Museum Tavern,  208 Bloor Street West (pub fare)

Opus Restaurant, 37 Prince Andrew Avenue (fine dining)

Oxley Public House** (accessible patio, inaccessible inside), 121 Yorkville Avenue (upscale pub fare)

Sassafraz Restaurant*, 100 Cumberland Street (French-inspired Canadian cuisine)

Trattoria Nervosa*, 75 Yorkville Avenue (Italian)

Utsav, 69 Yorkville Avenue (Indian)

Sotto, Sotto, 120 Avenue Rd, Toronto, ON (Upscale trattoria)

Big Sushi, 388 Bloor Street W (Modest space for rolls, nigiri, sashimi, tempura & teriyaki, with fixed-price lunch specials.)

 

CAFES ON AND NEAR CAMPUS

b Espresso Bar*, in The Royal Conservatory of Music building, 273 Bloor Street West

L’ Espresso Bar Mercurio*, 321 Bloor Street West

The Coffee Lab, 333 Bloor Street W (excellent coffee bean selection)

Almond Butterfly, 100 Harbord St. (coffee & gluten free)

 

LUNCH ON AND NEAR CAMPUS

Fresh** (wheelchair accessible, but cramped space), 326 Bloor Street West at Spadina (vegetarian)

Innis College Cafe, (just across the street from Robarts) 2 Sussex Ave at St. George (sandwiches, salads, sometimes really good kebabs)

Almond Butterfly, 100 Harbord St. (coffee & gluten free)

Gardiner Museum Bistro*(just South of the CMS Building), 111 Queens Park

Gallery Grill*at Hart House, 7 Hart House Circle (U of T Campus)

Sammy’s Student Exchange* at Hart House,  7 Hart House Circle (U of T Campus)

Whole Foods Market*, 87 Avenue Road (cafe & supermarket)

The Tiffin Box, 938 Bathurst St (Indian take-away; has a small seating area)

Fennel Organic Eatery, 322 Bloor Street West inside Noah’s Organic Foods (vegan)

Potbelly Sandwich Works, 180 Bloor Street West (made-to-order toasted sandwiches, salads & baked goods.)

Flock, 97 Harbord St, Toronto, (chicken specialist serving rotisserie birds)

Harbord House, 150 harbord Street, (housemade comfort food & local draft beer.)

Magic Noodle, 93 Harbord Street (Chinese hand-made noodles)

Gabby’s, 192 Bloor Street West, (pub fare)

 

Not near UofT but highly recommended

Estiatorio Volos, 133 Richmond St W, Toronto, ON M5H 2L3 (Greek) https://volos.ca/

Buk Chang Dong Soon Tofu, 691 Bloor St W, Toronto, ON M6G (spicy tofu hot pots & other Korean fare, including kimchi.)

Jules Bistro, 924 Queen Street W (Simple Southern French cuisine in an unassuming setting, with a three-course prix fixe menu. Great steak frites!)

La Carnita, 106 John Street, (tacos and craft beer)

Return of the NCS Mentorship Program

NCS PODCAST - Episode 2

Electronic Travel Authorization - NCS Toronto 2018

NCS PODCAST - Episode 1

The Chaucer Society, Victorian Medievalism, and the Nation-State: Englishness and Empire

“Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and the Aesthetics of Incompleteness.”

Professor John Anthony Burrow Obituary

Secondary School Teachers’ Pre-Conference Workshop

DATE: July 10, 2018
LOCATION: Victoria College Chapel

9:00 - 9:30         Coffee

9:30 - 12:30       Working Meeting of NCS Secondary Education Group led by John Hoarty, and Mary Katherine Waterman (bring your laptops!). We will begin with general discussion, break into smaller groups to work, then reconvene to share our progress and questions.

  • WHAT: What materials do we wish to develop and share?
  • Explore ways that we could promote tying The Canterbury Tales to some current trends in secondary English: community building; emphasizing individual voice/agency; and appreciation of world cultures.  
  • Explore unconventional, incremental, and/or episodic ways to include Chaucer/ CT in secondary courses. (As we develop lesson plan resources, it may work to just have a section for smaller Chaucer units in addition to full studies of The Canterbury Tales.)
  • In preparation for our Illuminated Manuscripts collaboration: How can we incorporate illuminated manuscripts in secondary classrooms.
  • HOW: How might we best format information for sharing?
  • WHERE: Where can materials be collected and made available?

12:45 - 1:45       Lunch

2:00 - 4:00        Workshop at the Fisher Rare Book Library: Using Medieval Manuscripts in the Secondary School Classroom, Michael Kuczynski, Tulane University, Archives and Outreach Program

4:00-4:30          Coffee

4:30 - 5:15        Business Meeting

  • Current issues in Medieval Studies
  • Group organization and communication for upcoming 2 years?
  • Identify central issues and topics

5:30            Wine Hour with NCS Trustees

 

General Congress - JULY 11-15, 2018: Selected Topics

K-12 TEACHERS: PLEASE REGISTER FOR THE PRE-CONGRESS WORKSHOP HERE

*PLEASE REGISTER FOR BOTH EVENTS IF YOU PLAN TO ATTEND THE WORKSHOP AND THE GENERAL CONGRESS*

Graduate Students

Graduate Students

"Fisher" by Sean_Marshall is licensed under CC-BY NC 2.0 / cropped from original

The New Chaucer Society is now accepting applications for spots in the Graduate Student Workshop at the 2018 Congress in Toronto.

The Graduate Workshop is a day-long session for graduate students and recent PhDs attending the 2018 Congress. Current students and PhDs who earned their degrees on or after July 1, 2016 are welcome to apply. The Workshop is open to students with no formal training and limited experience with manuscripts. It will take place on Tuesday, July 10, 2018, to be followed by a reception Toronto’s Fisher Rare Books Library on the evening of Friday, July 13.

If you would like to attend the Workshop, please send an email to Kara Gaston (kara.gaston@utoronto.ca) along with a brief outline of your PhD topic and a short CV. Places will be given in preference to those who have NOT attended a Workshop before; please state in your email if you have attended a Workshop in the past. Those who have been offered a place on the Workshop are also eligible to apply for the Donald Howard Travel Scholarship. Please submit separate applications to both the Howard Scholarship and the Graduate Workshop.

The deadline for applications for both the Workshop and the Donald Howard Travel Scholarships is December 15, 2017. Applicants for the Workshop will be chosen and notified before the decisions about the Howard Scholarships are made.

Accessibility

The University of Toronto’s commitment to accessibility is described on its website as follows:

“It is the University of Toronto’s goal to create a community that is inclusive of all persons and treats all members of the community in an equitable manner. In creating such a community, the University aims to foster a climate of understanding and mutual respect for the dignity and worth of all persons.”

Information on and links to campus resources arising from or related to Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) can be found here: University of Toronto’s AODA Office

Accessibility at Conference Venues

The main buildings for the sessions and plenaries are wheelchair accessible and detailed information about accessibility for the main conference venues is listed below.
Victoria University
Isabel Bader Theatre
Hart House
Art Gallery of Ontario

We will post signs by campus buildings and have volunteers on hand to guide conference attendees to the appropriate entrances.

The University of Toronto Campus Map also provides information on accessible entrances for all buildings on campus.

Accessible Transit

If you plan on travelling via public transit we recommend that you consult the TTC’s Handbook for Accessible Travel before arriving in Toronto. The handbook has information on wheelchair accessible stops and includes an accessible route planner. Not all the subway stops on the TTC are wheelchair accessible yet, including Museum Station, which is the closest subway stop to the conference venue. It has two exits, both of which require climbing stairs. The closest TTC stop with a wheelchair accessible entrance/exit is Bloor/Yonge Station. It is a ten-minute walk from Victoria University. Bay St Station is not wheelchair accessible, but has escalators from the platform to street level. It is a six-minute walk from the conference venue.

Family Room

The Northrop Fry Centre in Victoria College will be available to attendees as a family room. There are no sinks - but it will have a diaper changing station and tables and chairs as well as WiFi. Attendees can use it as a rendezvous room for partners and kids, or a place to relax with a tired child. The room is intended as a place where you can feel more comfortable; especially too, where partners or baby-sitters can wait without feeling out-of place at the conference. 

Lactation Room

Room 206 in Victoria College will be available for attendees to use as a lactation room.

Quiet Room

Room 108 in Emmanuel College will be available for attendees to use as a quiet space throughout the conference. 

Prayer Rooms

There is a dedicated Muslim Prayer Space downstairs in Emmanuel College, room 006. There are Ablution Facilities in EM 004. There is a multi-faith prayer space in EM 005.

Accessible Seating

There will be marked, dedicated accessible seating in the front row of every session room. If you wish to use this seating and would like a blue identification sticker to attach to the back of your nametag, they will be available at the registration desk.

Please vacate these seats for anyone who needs them, regardless of whether or not they present a blue sticker.

Sign Interpreting

If you require Sign Language Interpreting Services, please contact alexandra.gillespie@utoronto.ca

Maps

We have created a Google map with locations of the conference venues, local hotels, restaurants and cafes, local attractions, and nearby pharmacies and hospitals which can be accessed here.

The University of Toronto Campus Map provides information on accessible entrances for all buildings on campus.

Parking near the conference venue.

Floor plans for the conference and reception venues are listed below:

Art Gallery of Ontario
Northrop Frye Hall
Victoria College Building - First Floor
Victoria College Building - Second Floor
Daniels Spectrum

Please check back as these may be updated closer to the date.

Pre-Conference Information

VENUE INFORMATION AND CAMPUS MAP

Online registration will open on 12 January 2018 for the New Chaucer Society Congress 2018 (#NCS18). The Congress will take place at Victoria University in the University of Toronto.

Sessions will take place in the Victoria College building and Northrop Frye Hall. The plenaries, members Parliament, and the Friday evening performance of Wahala Dey Oh! will take place in Victoria University’s Isabel Bader Theatre.

A Google map of the conference locations, hotels, local restaurants, and other attractions can be found here. Maps of the campus and floor plans for the venues can be found on our maps page.

ONSITE REGISTRATION

Early registration will be open from 1-5pm on Tuesday 10 July, in the foyer of the Victoria College building. Registration will then be open from Wednesday 11 July - Friday 13 July, also in the foyer of Victoria College.

POWERPOINT AND INTERNET ACCESS

You will be provided with instructions for how to access University of Toronto WiFi in your conference materials.

TRANSPORTATION

Please note that you will need a valid passport to enter Canada, whether you travel by air or by land. Canada has introduced a new entry requirement, known as an Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA), for certain international travellers who fly to Canada. Read about the changes and how they may affect you.

Toronto is serviced by two airports: Lester B. Pearson Airport and Billy Bishop Airport. While most flights pass through Pearson International Airport (located approximately 40 minutes outside downtown Toronto), regional flights via Porter Airlines come into Billy Bishop Island Airport, just south of downtown Toronto.

Travel from Pearson Airport:

Taxis and Airport Limos: Taxis and airport limousines are readily available at designated areas outside the terminals at Pearson Airport. The most cost effective option of these is (counter-intuitively) the flat-rate limousine services: so we recommend you head to the LIMO stand. The flat rate to your hotel should be between $60 and $70 CAD and take approximately 40 minutes to reach downtown. Airport limos can be booked in advance at (416) 304-1010.

Taxis will cost between $65 and $75 CAD and take approximately 40 minutes to reach downtown.

You are advised not to hire drivers soliciting inside the terminals or asking guests to follow them to the parking garage or any other location due to safety reasons.

Union Pearson Express: The Union Pearson Express runs every fifteen minutes from Terminal 1 and takes approximately 30 minutes to reach Union Station in downtown Toronto. The UP Terminal is directly adjacent to the Link Train service linking Terminals 1 and 3. The one way fare to Union Station is $12.35 CAD ($24.70 return). Tickets can be purchased at the UP service counter in the International Arrivals hall of Terminal 1 or online.

For the Park Hyatt and the Intercontinental, travel north from Union Station on the University-Spadina Line to St. George Station. For the Toronto Marriott Bloor Yorkville, travel north on the University-Spadina Line to Bloor Station. For the Holiday Inn Downtown and the Courtyard Marriott Downtown Toronto travel north on the Yonge Line to College Station. The Adult TTC Fare is $3.25 CAD (one way).

Public Transit (TTC): The “Airport Rocket” (Bus #192) provides all-day, regular accessible express bus service between Pearson International Airport and Kipling Subway Station on the Bloor-Danforth Subway Line (Line 2). The Adult TTC Fare is $3.25 CAD (one way). Take Bus #192 from Terminal 1: Ground Level – Second Curb, Column R4 or Terminal 3: Arrivals Level – Third Curb, Column C12 to Kipling Subway Station.

For the Park Hyatt and The Intercontinental, travel east from Kipling Station on the Bloor-Danforth Subway Line to St. George Station. For the Toronto Marriott Bloor Yorkville travel east on the Bloor-Danforth Subway Line to Yonge Station. For the Holiday Inn Downtown and the Courtyard Marriott Downtown Toronto travel east on the Bloor-Danforth Subway Line to Yonge Station, then south on the Yonge Line to College Station.

Travel from Billy Bishop Airport:

Taxis: There is a taxi rank immediately upon exiting the airport. Standard city rates will apply.

Airport Shuttle: Billy Bishop Airport offers a complimentary Express Shuttle Bus between Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport and Union Station in downtown Toronto. The shuttle runs approximately every 15 minutes and is open to anyone going to the airport, whether or not they are traveling.

Public Transit (TTC): For The Park Hyatt and The Intercontinental, travel north from Union Station on the University-Spadina Line to St. George Station. For the Toronto Marriott Bloor Yorkville, travel north on the University-Spadina Line to Bloor Station. For the Holiday Inn Downtown and the Courtyard Marriott Downtown Toronto travel north on the Yonge Line to College Station. The Adult TTC Fare is $3.25 CAD (one way).

For planning your travel around Toronto we recommend using the TTC Trip Planner (http://www.ttc.ca/Trip_planner/index.jsp) or the Google Maps app. Fares on buses, streetcars, and subways are paid either by a Presto card or with a token. Tokens can be purchased from machines at the airport and from booth collectors in every subway station.

Travel to/from the venue

The nearest subway stop for the conference venue is Museum (Line 1/Yonge-University). Exiting from the east side of the station will bring you out on Charles St. W, a few minutes walk away from the conference venue. Information about the nearest accessible TTC station can be found on our accessibility page.

Taxis in Toronto may be hailed from the street, or pre-arranged by telephone. They are recognizable by their light on the roof of their car, and are legally required to carry their badge and registration in the interior of the cab. If you plan to travel via taxi we recommend using Beck Taxi or Dignity Transportation Inc. Please note that taxi companies are not permitted to charge extra for wheelchairs or service dogs.

ELECTRONIC TRAVEL AUTHORIZATION

Many international visitors require an Electronic Travel Authorization to travel to Canada. It is relatively quick and painless, costs $7 CAD, and is all done online:
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/visit-canada/eta.html?utm_source=slash-eta_ave&utm_medium=short-url-en&utm_campaign=eta
 

FAMILY ROOM & LACTATION ROOM

The Northrop Frye Centre in Victoria College will be available to attendees as a family room. There are no special facilities like sinks or plumbing but it will have tables and chairs as well as WiFi. Attendees can use it as a rendezvous room for partners and kids, or a place to relax with a tired child. As with the previous conference, the room is intended as a place where you can feel more comfortable; especially too, where partners or baby-sitters can wait without feeling out-of place at the conference. There will be a Facebook group to share advice and babysitting - please contact Alexandra Gillespie directly for more information. Room 206 in Victoria College will be available as a lactation room.

QUIET ROOM

Room 211 in Victoria College will be available for attendees to use as a quiet space throughout the conference. 

TOURIST INFORMATION

http://www.seetorontonow.com/

FOOD AND DRINK

There are many options for dining in and around the University of Toronto campus:

For breakfast, brunch, lunch, or a snack, L’Espresso Bar Mercurio (321 Bloor Street West) is about a ten minute walk from Victoria University.  The Exchange, five minutes from the Bloor/St. George intersection in the Rotman School of Business (105 St. George St), which has all day breakfast and good coffee and is much cheaper! For light, fresh, vegetarian food, we recommend Fresh on Bloor (326 Bloor Street West, on the corner of Bloor and Spadina). There are also two middle of the road food-serving pubs nearby: Duke of York (39 Prince Arthur Ave, one block north of Bloor and one block east of St. George St.) and Bedford Academy (36 Prince Arthur Ave).

Chinatown and Kensington Market are a short walk south of College Street on Spadina Avenue and they have a large number of inexpensive and interesting restaurants to choose from. You can read about some of them here and here.

There are several higher end venues on Harbord Street, which is on the way to Chinatown. See here for details.

There are also many restaurants to choose from further west on Bloor including Japanese, Indian, Korean, Thai, Middle Eastern, Mexican, and Hungarian restaurants.

ACCOMMODATION

Detailed information on accommodation can be found on our accommodations page.

CLIMATE AND CLOTHING

Summer in Toronto is traditionally hot and humid. Temperatures can range from 22C to 30C / 70F to 90F - it’s a good idea to carry a water bottle with you around the city. Be prepared for sun or showers.

CREDIT CARDS

Credit cards are widely accepted throughout Toronto. The major cards in Canada are MASTERCARD and VISA, and AMERICAN EXPRESS is also widely accepted. Cash can be obtained at every bank branch as well as in all ATMs throughout the city. There are several ATMs at and around the University of Toronto campus, a map of which can be found here.

CURRENCY EXCHANGE

The Canadian dollar is at a low against the US dollar, the British pound and the Euro, but rates do fluctuate. You can change currency at the airport and at banks, although it is now usually cheaper to withdraw cash from an ATM.

SHOPPING

Toronto is a great city for shopping, with both mainstream retailers and small independent shops throughout the city. The mainstream shopping area of the city is at Yonge and Queen Street (Queen or Dundas station); this includes large fashion retailers, the Eaton Centre Mall, the Hudson’s Bay Company, and the new Sak’s 5th Avenue department store. Other areas for fun shopping include Queen West (Osgoode station or the 501 Queen streetcar) for smaller stylish clothing boutiques; the St. Lawrence Market (King station), named National Geographic’s top food market in the world; the Distillery District (King station and 514 Cherry streetcar) for hipster crafts, dining, clothes, and design. Harmonized Sales Tax (HST) is not included in pricing and will be added at the cash register at the rate of 13%.

ELECTRICAL CURRENT

Remember, if you are coming from outside of North America you’ll need to bring adaptors for your electrical goods: every socket uses a two- or three-pin plug, 120 voltage.

PHARMACIES, EMERGENCY AND MEDICAL HELP:

Pharmacy

Nearby pharmacies include two Shoppers Drug Mart locations on Bloor St. (236 Bloor St W) and Charles St. (718 Yonge St).

Emergencies

The emergency number (when there is a risk to life, or if a crime is being committed) for the Emergency Services (Fire, Police, Ambulance) is 911. The non-emergency number for police is (416) 808-2222. The nearest emergency room is at Sunnybrook Hospital (43 Wellesley St E,) just east of Yonge St.

TELEPHONE AND MOBILE PHONES

The code for Canada from overseas is +1. Direct non-US long-distance calls can be made to Europe by dialing 011 plus the country code, and the number you wish to reach. Toronto sits within two area codes, 416 and 647. In order to reach a local number, you will need to add one of these three-digit area codes before the seven digit local number, e.g. 416-978-2011. Many American phone plans like Verizon and T-Mobile offer North American-wide add-ons which allow you to use your phone in Canada just as you would at home.

TIPPING AND TAX

Most purchases made in Ontario are subject to Harmonized Sales Tax (HST), which is added to the stated price of the purchase at the point of sale at a rate of 13%. Certain goods, including books, newspapers, certain food and beverages, childrens’ clothing, and feminine hygiene products, are exempt from HST.

Tipping, although nominally expected with quality service, is expected in cabs, restaurants, bars, and with home delivery services at a minimum rate of 15%, or 20% if service is exceptional.

Excursions: 15 July

Excursions must be signed up for on the main registration page at Hart House Tickets. The simplest way to do this is at the same time you register.

Please note that all excursion times are subject to change; we will update this page with final information closer to the conference.

Niagara Wine and Grape Tour and Lunch - $150

Note that this excursion will go ahead with a minimum of 20 people - if it is cancelled, we will reimburse those affected.  
Wine and Grape Tours offers an escape to magnificent Niagara Wine Country. Discover some of the most incredible wines, stroll through grape vineyards and shop at the winery boutiques. Your knowledgeable tour guide will present details and the history of Niagara’s sites and attractions for your tour. Guests will have an opportunity to experience how wine is made with a private wine tour of the vineyard and barrel cellar. Everyone will enjoy sipping a variety of wines at three unique style wineries. A delicious barbecue steak and chicken lunch will be served on a picturesque covered patio (weather permitting) at beautiful Rockway Vineyards prepared by a top chef who uses fresh ingredients to create decadent dishes.

+ 10:30 am pick up in Toronto
+ 12:00 private wine tour and tasting at Flatrock Cellars Winery
+ 1:15 private wine tastings &andbarbecue steak and chicken lunch
+ 3:15 private wine tasting at Green Lane Winery
+ 3:45 return to Toronto

Ward’s Island - Walk and Lunch - $95

Note that this excursion has a cap of 30 people.
The Toronto Island community at Ward's Island is a charming residential neighbourhood, unique in the urban, North American context. This year-round cottage-like community of 650 people living in wood-frame homes is car free, and store-free, yet only a 10 minute ferry boat ride from the downtown core of Canada's largest city, Toronto. Join Susan and Linda, two long-time Island residents for a one hour guided walk through this vibrant and unusual neighbourhood. The guests will have a 1:30 hour walking tour that includes homes, gardens, public spaces, etc. They will learn about the Island's rich 150-year history – from its days as a healing ground for Indigenous peoples, to a resort community for Toronto's wealthiest families, to today's thriving community of writers, artists and mixed-income families living in the lush green Toronto Island Park. We’ll then take everyone back to The Shaw House for wine, coffee/tea and selections of homemade desserts. The Shaw House has a beautiful garden that overlooks Lake Ontario. If the weather’s good, we’ll set up our buffet and drink tables outdoors.

+ 12:30 pm meet at the ferry 
+ 12:45 pm ferry to the Island
+ 1:00 pm tour begins
+ 4:30 pm return to the mainland

CANCELLED Stratford Festival - Play and Picnic - $200

Located in Stratford, Ontario, Canada, the Stratford Festival is North America’s largest classical repertory theatre company. Each season, they present a dozen or more productions in four distinctive venues. They produce classics, contemporary dramas and musicals, with special emphasis on the plays of Shakespeare. After a bus ride through scenic southern Ontario, enjoy a specially catered lunch and take in a performance of Oscar Wilde’s “An Ideal Husband”, directed by Lezlie Wade, featuring Tim Campbell, Brad Hodder, and Joseph Ziegler, in the historic Avon Theatre.

+ 9:30 am pick up in Toronto
+ 12:30 pm picnic lunch
+ 2:00 pm “An Ideal Husband”
+ 4:30 pm return to Toronto

CANCELLED Royal Ontario and Aga Khan Museums - Visit and Lunch - $150

The Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) is Canada’s largest museum, of both natural history and world cultures. Opened in 1914, the ROM currently holds six million objects in its collections with over 30 galleries showcasing art, archaeology and natural science. It is one of North America's great museums, a research institution of international renown and a leading cultural attraction for the city, province and country. The Aga Khan Museum in Toronto offers visitors a window into worlds unknown or unfamiliar: the artistic, intellectual, and scientific heritage of Muslim civilizations across the centuries from the Iberian Peninsula to China. Join us for a visit to each of these stunning museums and a catered lunch at the Diwan Restaurant, which features food inspired by the Middle East, North Africa, and the Indian subcontinent. Diwan’s elegant interior - complete with floor-to-ceiling windows - features 19th-century wooden panels hand-carved and painted in Damascus.

+ 10:30 am meet at Royal Ontario Museum 
+ 12:00 pm bus to Aga Khan Museum
+ 12:30 pm lunch at Diwan Restaurant
+ 2:00 pm visit Aga Khan Museum
+ 4:00 pm bus return to Toronto    

Six Nations of the Grand River Reserve - Visit and Lunch - $90

Six Nations Tourism offers an opportunity to learn the rich culture of the Haudenosaunee. Visitors will be provided with information about the successes and failures of Canada's continuing Truth and Reconciliation process, Iroquois culture, history, events, facilities, organizations, and services on the Six Nations of the Grand River Territory. The trip includes a visit to Her Majesty’s Royal Chapel of the Mohawks; built in 1785, it is the oldest surviving church in Ontario and the only remaining building of the original Mohawk Village. For NCS 2018 are especially honored to feature an hour long discussion and Q&A with a Six Nations Elder on the subject of water.

+ 9:00 am bus to Six Nations
+ 10:30 am tour of Woodland Cultural Centre - Residential School
+ 12:30 pm lunch (provided)
+ 1:30 pm tour Museum at Woodland Cultural Centre
+ 2:30 pm travel to Her Majesty’s Royal Chapel of the Mohawks
+ 2:45 pm tour of Her Majesty’s Royal Chapel of the Mohawks
+ 3:30 pm travel to Kayanase
+ 4:00 pm guided tour of Kayanase, a 17th century longhouse
+ 5:00 pm step-on bus tour
+ 6:00 pm discussion with Elder
+ 7:00 pm return to Toronto

Schedule: 14 July

PDF OF FULL PROGRAM

9:00-10:30    SESSIONS: GROUP 9

Session 9A: The Woman Question: Chaucer in his European Context (Seminar)

This “working research seminar” will consider Chaucer’s relationship to late medieval European intellectual and literary traditions of women, including story collections of classical women; the Querelles des Femmes; conduct literature; and the Griselda story, among others. We invite papers that reexamine Chaucer’s engagement with these various European traditions. Authors often gain praise for how they distinguish themselves from tradition; thus Chaucer was once imagined as moving through and beyond French and Italian phases to emerge as a great English poet. How might we now benefit from examining similarities rather than differences between Chaucer and continental traditions, particularly those that theorize and represent women? For more on the “working research seminar” model, see: http://www.shakespeareassociation.org/seminars-and-workshops/guidelines/.

Thread: Chaucer Abroad
Organizers: Betsy McCormick (Mount San Antonio College); Lynn Shutters (Colorado State University)
Moderators: Lynn Shutters
Room: Victoria College Chapel

  1. Glenn Burger (Queens College and The Graduate Center, CUNY), "Who Could Tell the Joy That Is between a Husband and His Wife: Chaucer and French Conduct Literature for Women"
  2. Lucy R. Hinnie (University of Edinburgh), “Negotiating the querelle des femmes in the Bannatyne MS c.1568”
  3. Matthew W. Irvin (University of the South), “‘The Temple of Clemency and 'Verray Wommanhede'”
  4. Wendy A. Matlock (Kansas State University), “Ventriloquizing Mothers: Chaucer’s Feminized Latin Sources”
  5. Will Rogers (University of Louisiana, Monroe), “Chaucer’s Woes and Women: Poetic Traumas, European and English”
  6. Leah Schwebel (Texas State University), “#Notallwomen: The (In)imitable Griselda”

Session 9B: Household Sciences and the Arts of Conduct (Lightning)    

This session invites novel approaches to the arts of conduct in late medieval England. Our aim is to reconsider the tradition of texts on table manners, household ethics, and other forms of etiquette, while at the same time addressing materials not typically grouped under the “conduct” rubric but which likewise arbitrate everyday praxis. Such texts include agricultural and gardening treatises, medical and scientific manuals, and catalogs and calendars. Lightning talks might take up questions like the following: How do codes of conduct embody and transmit knowledge? How does form affect reception? Can resistant readings to conduct literature be envisaged? How do conduct texts interface with other types of texts, in what manuscript contexts? How might medieval codifications of everyday praxis speak to present-day conversations about the policing of bodies, behaviors, and ideas? What processes of sexual, racial, gender, and class identity-construction do we inherit from the Middle Ages?

Thread: Forming Knowledge       
Organizers: Rory Critten (University of Lausanne), Arthur Russell (Case Western Reserve University)
Moderators: Arthur Russell
Room: Victoria College 115

  1. Katelyn Jaynes (University of Connecticut), “Real or Ideal? Agricultural Manuals and the Late Medieval Household”
  2. Hannah Bower (University of Oxford), “Inadequate Guides and Troublesome ‘Bokes’: Intertextual Voices in Vernacular Verse Herbals”
  3. Chelsea Silva (University of California, Riverside), “(Im)practical Magic: Middle English Recipe Collections and Everyday Recreation”
  4. Mary Beth Long (University of Arkansas), “To Pray or Knot: Stitching Feminine Authority into An ABC
  5. Lynn Arner (Brock University), “Eating like a Dog: Dining Etiquette and Socioeconomic Stratification in Medieval England”

Session 9C: The Object in/of History (Paper)             

History traditionally privileges the narrative of anthropocentric society, and thus in any discussion of literature and history we usually find ourselves engaging the elements of literature that also privilege that narrative. Contemporary literary theory, however, has made radical changes to the assumption of anthropocentrism as the default perspective in medieval literature. In particular, Actor-Network Theory (ANT) and Object Oriented Ontology (OOO) have led medievalists to fundamentally revise our understanding of the medieval world. These theories ask us to look at associations between objects and, perhaps most importantly, to realize that humans need not be part of the action, the relationship, or the world at all. This panel, then, seeks submissions that explore these moments in literature where we see the objects in/of history.

Thread: History Now             
Organizers: Kara McShane (Ursinus College); Jeffery G. Stoyanoff (Spring Hill College)
Moderator: Jeffery G. Stoyanoff
Room: Victoria College 101

  1. Heather Blatt (Florida International University), “Textuality and Object-Object Material Meaning”
  2. Richard H. Godden (Louisiana State University), “Material Selves: Impairment and the Ecology of Objects in Saints' Lives”
  3. Alan S. Montroso (George Washington University), “‘Hir eyen caste she ful lowe adoun’: Peering into the Subterranean Archive with Diana’s Statue in the Knight’s Tale

Session 9D: Engaging with Old English in Late Medieval England (Lightning)  

This session will consider how the textual material of the past was used by late medieval authors and audiences. What cultural work was implicit in the choice of language, and what linguistic features were considered salient or significant? How did authors understand and respond to the process of language change? To what extent was linguistic diachrony a concern in pedagogical contexts? How accurate or useful is the model which contrasts Latin immutability with vernacular instability? To what extent could the vernacular past aspire to the authority of venerable Latin textual traditions?

Thread: Language Contacts     
Organizer: Thomas Hinton (University of Exeter)
Moderator: Thomas Hinton   
Room: Emmanuel College 119    

  1. Carla Maria Thomas (Independent Scholar), “Poetic Mutation: Old English Content in Latin Form”
  2. Alexandra Reider (Yale University), “Older English Wisdom: Alfred, Bede, and Proverbial Antiquing in the Thirteenth Century”
  3. Susanna Fein (Kent State University), “Hagiographical Continuities”
  4. Stephen M. Yeager (Concordia University, Montréal), “Charters and the Chaucerians”

Session 9E: Uncritical Editions (Paper)

This panel will explore an alternative history of Middle English in print by foregrounding texts that fail to conform to critical norms. Participants might consider editions of Chaucer and other Middle English writers produced before the advent of modern textual theory; work that employs alternative or outdated editorial practices and methods; or adaptations, abridgments, and teaching editions that alter the received text without explicit textual rationale. What role does this oft-elided editorial work play in making the Middle English texts that we read, edit, and interpret today? What (if any) is the critical significance of uncritical editions?

Thread: Making the Text
Organizer: Megan Cook (Colby College)
Moderator: Megan Cook
Room: Victoria College 212

  1. Simone Celine Marshall (University of Otago), “Mixing Modern and Middle English: John Urry’s 1721 Edition and the 1807 Chaucer”
  2. Jennifer Jahner (California Institute of Technology), “Thomas Wright’s Republic of Letters: Editing the Multilingual Middle Ages in Nineteenth-Century London”
  3. Simon Horobin (Magdalene College, Oxford), “Henry Bradshaw and the Clarendon Chaucer Edition”
  4. Elizabeth Melick (Kent State University), “Late Nineteenth-Century Uncritical Editions and the Digital Age: Sidney Herrtage's Editions of the Otuel-Cycle Charlemagne Romances”

Session 9F: Queer Ruptures to Normative Time (Lightning)

Peter Travis concluded a 1997 essay with the suggestively ironic remark, “one of these days we may indeed arrive at an adequate understanding of time.” While in 2017 we still may not be faced with “an adequate understanding of time” given time’s ultimately elusive nature, we have done much over the past twenty years to theorize temporality. We acknowledge that visions of time are relative and dependent upon the lens of the viewer, who may be outside the reigning heteronormative temporality. Queer studies and queer temporality have ultimately introduced consideration of an array of Other voices whose position in and out of standard time is complicated by their racial, religious, able-bodied, gendered/sexed, and socio-economic différance. This session invites papers that take a position on how temporal Others evoke non-normative ways of seeing that may reshape our understanding of temporal scale(s).

Thread: Middle English Literature at Scale       
Organizer: Miriamne Ara Krummel (University of Dayton)
Moderator: Miriamne Ara Krummel
Room: Victoria College 323

  1. Theresa Tinkle (University of Michigan), “Temporal Polemics in the York Corpus Christi Play”
  2. Kristi J. Castleberry (Lyndon State College), “‘Yeres and dayes fleet this creature’: Floating Outside of Time in Chaucer's Man of Law's Tale
  3. Emma Lipton (University of Missouri), “The Asynchronous Temporal Scales of Medieval Drama”
  4. Robert Barrett (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), “Fruit in Due Season: Vegetal Temporality in the Legend of the Wood of the Cross”
  5. Catherine S. Cox (University of Pittsburgh, Johnstown), “Transtemporal Otherness and the Queering of Faith”

Session 9G: Carnal Chaucer: Troilus and Criseyde (Paper)
Organizers: Joe Stadolnik (University College London), Carissa M. Harris (Temple University)
Moderator: Suzanne Akbari (University of Toronto)
Room: Victoria College 215

  1. Richard Sévère (Valparaiso University), “Understanding Chaucer’s Carnal Friendships:  Exploring, Exploiting and Extolling Bodies in Troilus and Criseyde
  2. Timothy Arner (Grinnell College), “Trojan Nobodies: Uncarnal Knowledge in Troilus and Criseyde
  3. Dana M. Roders (Purdue University), “Love Hurts: Lovesickness as Disability in Chaucer and Henryson”

Session 9H: On and Off the Page: Reading Chaucerian Women (Paper)
Organizers: The NCS Program Committee
Moderator: Sarah Baechle (University of Mississippi)
Room: Emmanuel College 302

  1. Kara Doyle (Union College), “The Game of Love: Women Readers and the French Backdrop of Fairfax 16”
  2. Amy Goodwin (Randolph-Macon College), “Fashioned in France: Griselda’s Readers”
  3. Molly Martin (University of Indianapolis), “Grisilde’s Lonely Spaces”

Session 9I: Dramatic Bodies (Paper)  
Organizer: The NCS Program Committee   
Moderator: Suzanne M. Edwards (Lehigh University)  
Room: Northrop Frye 113    

  1. Jennifer Garrison (St. Mary's University, Calgary), “Mankind and the Gender Transformations of Medieval Confession”
  2. Jesse Njus (Virginia Commonwealth University), “The Authority of Experience: Moms Mabley, the Wife of Bath, and the Narrative Female Voice”
  3. Sylvia Tomasch (Hunter College, CUNY), “Jewface and Medieval Drama”

10:30-11:00     Break

11:00-12:30     SESSIONS: GROUP 10

Session 10A: Reassessing Boundaries: Chaucer and Medieval European Literatures (Paper)

From Mongol Sarai and Muslim Syria to Castilian kings, Persian polymaths, and crusading arenas that stretch from the Baltic to North Africa, Chaucer’s literary imagination spans geographies and cultures that are often considered to lie beyond the boundaries of “Europe.” This panel seeks to explore and interrogate the notion of “Europe” in relation to such perceived peripheral places in the age of Chaucer from a historical cross-cultural perspective: how are boundaries conceived, contested and/or imagined in relation to intellectual, scientific, cultural and literary exchanges? How can we compare/connect places, ideas and texts? What makes something “European?” Papers may address any aspect of such cross-cultural contact, particularly in light of new critical approaches to the concept of Medieval European Literatures, such as those formulated by David Wallace and outlined in a recent issue of Interfaces: A Journal of Medieval European Literatures.

Thread: Chaucer Abroad
Organizer: Shazia Jagot (University of Surrey)
Moderator: Shazia Jagot
Room: Victoria College 101

  1. Michelle Karnes (University of Notre Dame), “Babylon”
  2. Anna Wilson (Harvard University), “Historical Geographies in Late Medieval Pilgrimage Guides”
  3. Emily Houlik-Ritchey (Rice University), “Mediterranean Contexts in Floris and Blancheflour and the Crónica de Flores y Blancaflor

Session 10B: Medieval Technocultures II (Paper)       

Chaucer’s Treatise on the Astrolabe finds itself in the midst of a “techno turn” in which functional interfaces, instruments, and techno-scientific ways of knowing are gaining new prominence. Medieval technocultures will explore animating features of early devices, technics, or analytics. We invite presenters to take up such topics as physical media, visual diagrams, haptic feedback, literacy/numeracy, and their effects in and for literary history. We welcome those who stretch or bend the format to incorporate demos, models, ficto-criticism, interviews, the biography of an object, or intellectual geography. Speakers will, broadly speaking, address medieval techno-sciences that tend to propagate object-dependent knowledges. How is information located in an instrument, system, or praxis? Where is science situated?

Thread: Forming Knowledge           
Organizers: Jenna Mead (University of Western Australia); Alan Mitchell (University of Victoria)
Moderator: Jenna Mead
Room: Emmanuel College 119

  1. Tekla Bude (Oregon State University), “Hap, Hasarde, Aventure, Assurance: Medieval Technologies of Risk”
  2. Patricia Clare Ingham (Indiana University Bloomington), “Dead Metal”
  3. Emily Steiner (University of Pennsylvania), “Sydrac and Bokkus and Vernacular Information”

Session 10C: Gendered History, Historicized Gender II (Paper)

When the New Historicism was near its apogee, there was some controversy regarding its relation to feminism. As Wai-Chee Dimock wrote in American Literature in 1991, “If the feminist chronicling of women's oppression and celebration of women's difference have appeared misguided to many New Historicists, the New Historicist universalization of power and blurring of genders have struck many feminists as nothing short of reactionary.” As we reconsider the directions of historical analysis, it is appropriate to revisit questions of gender and history. This session seeks papers that offer innovative historicized analyses of gender, or that consider whether historically oriented critical approaches subsequent to New Historicism have addressed the quandary that Dimock identified.

Thread: History Now 
Organizer: Elizabeth Robertson (University of Glasgow)
Moderator: Jennifer Jahner (California Institute of Technology)
Room: Victoria College Chapel

  1. David Wallace (University of Pennsylvania), “Giovanni/Giovanna: Boccaccio and Chaucer Revisited”
  2. Michelle Ripplinger (University of California, Berkeley), “Chaucer’s Unanticipated Female Readers”
  3. Nicholas Watson (Harvard University), “Medieval Women's Literary Culture”

Session 10D: Late Fifteenth-Century Anglo-French (Lightning)

This panel invites lightning talks on late fifteenth-century Anglo-French literary relations. Heretofore, critics have focused on cross-Channel exchange in the fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries. This panel will extend the Anglo-French tradition further into the fifteenth century, to ask how the final years of the Hundred Years War influenced literary production, and to consider the status of French in England during the Wars of the Roses and the ascension of the Tudors. How does the still-understudied literature of the late fifteenth century carry on Anglo-French literary relations? Where do new forms and new avenues of influence emerge? For the purposes of this panel, the “late fifteenth century” stretches from Lydgate’s collaboration with Benedict Burgh in the 1440s to the writings of Skelton and the Scottish makars.

Thread: Language Contacts     
Organizers: R. D. Perry (New Chaucer Society Postdoctoral Fellow, Saint Louis University); Spencer Strub (University of California, Berkeley)
Moderator: R. D. Perry
Room: Victoria College 212

  1. Rory Critten (University of Lausanne), “Palsgrave's Examples”
  2. Catherine Nall (Royal Holloway, University of London), “Books of Consolation and of Comfort: Responding to Defeat at the End of the Hundred Years War”
  3. Jenni Nuttall (University of Oxford), “Were There English Rhétoriqueurs?”
  4. Jaclyn Rajsic (Queen Mary University of London), “Reading Genealogical Rolls across the Channel: Anglo-French during the Reign of King Henry VI”
  5. Misty Schieberle (University of Kansas), “Harley 219’s Epistre Othea and the Rise of English”

Session 10E: Inhabiting Inhuman Times (Seminar)

In medieval thought, linear human lifetimes unfolding from birth to death were also marked by nonhuman times, such as the cyclical seasons, the apparently timeless continuity of species and ecosystems, the chaotic turns of Fortune’s wheel. These intersecting times offer an ecosystemic challenge to thinking time, decentering the human in favor of a broader view of creaturely life. For example, what is the temporality of a saint’s restoration of prelapsarian peace among the creatures? In Piers Plowman, why do agricultural and social processes so persistently intersect?  In Chaucer's Knight's Tale, do the ships Mars burns, the towers Saturn pulls down, and the inspirited grove destroyed for Arcite’s pyre imagine the material world to be within the purview of Fortune and Providence? Why does the Gawain poet choose to narrate Sir Gawain's last year of life as a sequence of four seasons?

Thread: Middle English Literature at Scale 
Organizer: Susan Crane (Columbia University)
Moderator: Susan Crane 
Room: Victoria College 323

  1. Evelyn Reynolds (Indiana University Bloomington), “Rethinking the Temporality of Joy in Pearl’s Heaven”
  2. Tara Williams (Oregon State University), “Whale Time and the Poetics of Wonder in Patience”   
  3. Richard Firth Green (The Ohio State University), “Heterochronology in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight”   
  4. Elizabeth Allen (University of California, Irvine), “Hiding in Holes: Sanctuary and Time”
  5. Catherine Sanok (University of Michigan), “The Inhuman Day”
  6. Carolynn Van Dyke (Lafayette College), “‘Each in Its Kind’: Composing Species Time”
  7. Christine Chism (University of California, Los Angeles),“Vaster than Empires and More Slow: The Trees of Time in the Alexander Romance”

Session 10F: Five Easy Pieces: Augmented Teaching of Texts, Temporalities, and Fields (Lightning)

This session seeks focused presentations on texts for teaching and citing Middle English sources and the other contemporary literatures of later medieval England, including Chaucer, of course. Is the demise of the Riversideindicative of deep challenges to the field, or merely a pedagogical inconvenience—and so for Middle English anthologies, and Middle English courses, more broadly? Heretical positions encouraged: is it time to address Chaucer and Middle English texts for the twenty-first century, including respelled texts and translations? Provocations addressing changes, choices, and challenges are welcome: what will be the teaching texts and/or the editions of reference in 2050?

Organizer: Thomas Goodmann (University of Miami)
Moderator: Thomas Goodmann
Room: Emmanuel College 302

  1. Leah Haught (University of West Georgia), “Cannibalizing Chaucer Twice Over”
  2. Ben Joy Ambler (Dwight Englewood High School), “Incubating Interdisciplinarity”
  3. Sarah Noonan (Saint Mary's College, Indiana), “Beyond the Single-Author Edition: Anthologizing to Illustrate Chaucer’s Intellectual and Literary Foundations”
  4. Thomas Hahn (University of Rochester), “Praxis vs. Perfection: The Middle English Texts Series”
  5. William Rhodes (University of Pittsburgh), “Telling Different Stories”

Session 10G: Forms of Middle English Prayer II (Paper)

The history of Middle English lyric is indivisible from the history of prayer. Prayers for spiritual clarity resemble lyrics seeking affective catharsis, while Middle English poets are as likely to call for saintly intercession as to beg a patron’s assistance. This panel aims to explore the intersection of these two modes of language performance and to consider how their kinship might provide insight into broader questions of poetics and religion in later medieval literature. We welcome papers that consider any aspect of the relationship between prayer and lyric, but the following questions might serve as a starting point. To what extent do prayer and lyric share a common style, voice, form, or affect? Is Middle English “prayere” or “orisoun” a form distinct from Latin “oratio” or French “preiere”? Finally, is it more useful to distinguish between “secular” and “sacred” poetics in Middle English lyric or to dissolve this distinction?

Organizers: Taylor Cowdery (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill); Megan Murton (Catholic University of America)
Moderator: Taylor Cowdery
Room: Northrop Frye 113

  1. Anne Baden-Daintree (University of Bristol), “Prayerful Reading in the Domestic Household”
  2. Nicole D. Smith (University of North Texas), “Praying the Apostles’ Creed: ‘A Christian Mannes Believe,’ Lyric, and the Thinking Heart”
  3. Gabriel Haley (Concordia University, Nebraska), “Contemplative Ductus as Lyric Aesthetic”

Session 10H: Institutional Affects (Paper)

We invite reflections on the role of affects and emotions in our response to institutions in the broad fields of medieval studies and medievalism studies. In both arenas relationships with institutions are often as deeply emotional as they are intellectual. We think of Hoccleve in the office of the Privy Seal, or Margery Kempe’s struggles with priests and bishops, or medieval and modern scholars negotiating the demands and privileges of the university and the church; even the sometimes vexed relationship between medieval studies and medievalism in the modern academy. How do/can we read historical emotion and affect vis-à-vis institutions? How does/should emotion affect our work as medieval scholars?

Organizers: Thomas A. Prendergast (College of Wooster); Stephanie Trigg (University of Melbourne)
Moderator: Thomas A. Prendergast
Room: Victoria College 215

  1. Jessica Chace (New York University), “‘Should I Talk About My Depression?’: Melancholia and Hoccleve in the Classroom”
  2. George Shuffelton (Carleton College), “Mixed Feelings: The Emotional Life of the Medieval University”
  3. Jamie Taylor (Bryn Mawr College), “Chaucerian Anger:  Frustration, Outrage, and Literary Analysis in the Canterbury Tales
  4. Paul Megna (University of Western Australia), “Christ’s Whip: Anti-Institutional Affect and Divine Violence in the Chester Mystery Cycle”

Session 10I: New Ideas in Manuscript Studies II (Paper)

Definition of the "new field" of manuscript studies inaugurated by Doyle and Parkes in 1978 (Kerby-Fulton et al.) remains a process: the study of manuscripts has generated evidence about scribes, communities of scribes and readers, book producers, interactions between authors and scribes, and audience reception of texts; those concerns now overlap in discussions of evidence for scribal attribution, the readership of medieval texts, loci of textual transmission, editorial practice, and other issues. This session invites discussion of newly articulated evidence and newly recognized overlaps in manuscript study: descriptions of the as-yet unexplored ways in which their evidence can generate knowledge about medieval textual production.

Organizer: Thomas J. Farrell (Stetson University)
Moderator: Thomas J. Farrell
Room: Victoria College 115

  1. J. D. Sargan (University of Oxford), "'Cultural Graphology' and Creative Reading: Derrida, Fleming, and Reading Practice in Late Medieval Manuscripts"
  2. Ann Higgins (Westfield State University), "Manuscript as Fetish, Manuscript as Text: Ignoring the Argument of the Physical Object"
  3. Lawrence Warner (King's College London), "Scribe D, John Marchaunt, and the Dilemma of Identity"

12:30-2:00     Lunch

2:00-3:30    SESSIONS: GROUP 11

Session 11A: Chaucer on Islam and the East (Paper)

Chaucer accents Eastern elements beyond those present in his sources. He lavishes attention on Syrian women—Zenobia (Monk's Tale), the Sultaness (Man of Law's Tale)—and on Dido (Legend of Good Women and House of Fame); he heightens Islam’s role in Man of Law's Tale, sets Squire's Tale and Prioress’s Tale in eastern lands, and compiles eighth-century Egyptian astronomer Messahala’s texts in Treatise on the Astrolabe. From characters to content to forms, Arabic learning and Eastern elements reverberate. We seek papers addressing such elements in Chaucer, both how Islam and the East shape Chaucer's poetry and, reciprocally, how Chaucer reshapes Islam and the East.

Thread: Chaucer Abroad
Organizers: David Hadbawnik (American University of Kuwait),  Susan Nakley (St. Joseph’s College, New York)
Moderator: David Hadbawnik 
Room: Emmanuel College 119

  1. Gabriel Ford (Converse College), “Arabic Frametales and Chaucerian Fabliaux: A Reassessment”
  2. Leila K. Norako (University of Washington), “Chaucer's Spectrum of Otherness”
  3. Radhika Koul (Stanford University), “The Canterbury Tales in Light of the Kathāsaritasāgara: A New Perspective from the East”

Session 11B: Marginal Figures in Late Medieval Society and Its Texts (Paper)

Excluded from good society, marginal figures tend to be registered in legal records, an “archive of repression” (Geremek). Whatever their excluded group, their “abjected alterity” (Butler) enforces established social order even as they may constitute a zone of transgressive pleasure for good society, offering the opportunity of living dangerously (Hanawalt). Do historical and literary studies give us reconcilable accounts of the marginalized? Apt for historical understanding of the marginalized is a mode close to fiction, the microhistory, which couples social structures with a focus on lives in the everyday (as explored in a recent issue of JMEMS, for example). But what are the consequences of repressive archive and transgressive lure for understanding medieval fiction? Are particular genres (outlaw story, tales of trickery) peculiarly responsive to marginal lives, being "rooted in the real” (like microhistory) even when they engage in a play of conventions? Do novel subjectivities arise in marginalized, “in-between spaces” that “initiate new signs of identity” (Bhabha)?

Thread: History Now   
Organizer: Roger Nicholson (University of Auckland)
Moderator: Roger Nicholson
Room: Victoria College 101

  1. Rebecca Menmuir (University of Oxford), “Interpreting Letters: Ovid's Abandoned Women in Chaucer”
  2. Erica Weaver (University of California, Los Angeles), “Dear X: Liminal Affects”
  3. Jeremy DeAngelo (Carleton College), “Legal Outlawry and Fictional Heroism in the Tradition of Hereward the Wake”
  4. Leah Pope Parker (University of Wisconsin, Madison), “A Poetics of Neurodiversity in Hoccleve’s Compleinte

Session 11C: Language Contacts in Manuscript (Paper)

While the former standard narratives (by Suggett, R.M. Wilson, Berndt, Kibbee and others) of the literary and social roles played by multilingualism in the medieval period have been extensively revised, less attention has been paid to the nature and range of multi- or plurilingual manuscripts across the period, well beyond the well-known case of Piers Plowman. This session calls for work on the production and reception of codices in which languages are juxtaposed, interleaved or otherwise arranged, and asks what kinds of literary, linguistic, theological, social, or political implications there might be in the choice and disposition of languages across genres. Papers might address glossing, marginalia of all kinds, and the use of language in images, as well as the arrangements throughout a booklet or larger section of a manuscript of works in more than one language.

Thread: Language Contacts   
Organizer: Claire M. Waters (University of California, Davis)
Moderator: Claire M. Waters
Room: Victoria College 212

  1. J. R. Mattison (University of Toronto), “Managing French with English: Reading the Lancelot-Grail in Fifteenth-Century England”
  2. Emily Ulrich (Yale University), “Cumulative Semantics: Trilingual Reading Practices in McClean MS 123”
  3. Barbara Zimbalist (University of Texas, El Paso), “Multilingual Devotion in Fifteenth-Century Manuscripts”

Session 11D: Manuscript and the Print Devolution (Lightning)      

Recent scholarship on late-medieval manuscript production has revealed a complex and vibrant network of scribes, illuminators, and workshops, booksellers and readers—a culture that persists after the arrival of Caxton’s press to England in 1476. This session explores the role of the manuscript in the increasingly mechanized literary world of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. It theorizes the notion of a “print devolution,” a paradoxical increase in the authority, desirability, and production of manuscript books after the advent of print. Resisting accounts that simply chart the demise of the manuscript, this session explores the complexities and complications of a historical moment where these purportedly disparate forms coexisted.

Thread: Making the Text     
Organizer: Zachary Hines (University of Texas at Austin)
Moderator: Zachary Hines
Room: Emmanuel College 302

  1. Aditi Nafde (Newcastle University), “Reading the Printed Book in Manuscript”
  2. Mimi Ensley (University of Notre Dame), “Inscribing the Tradition: A Recusant Catholic’s Romance Manuscripts”
  3. Martha Driver (Pace University), “From Public to Private: MSS on the Move”
  4. Thomas Sawyer (Washington University in St. Louis), “Apocalipsis Libri Impressi”
  5. Carl Kears (King's College London), “Franciscus Junius: Making Networks Through Manuscript Books”

Session 11E: Scale Jumping (Paper)

Scale jumping in geography is when a social or other phenomenon jumps from a small sphere of influence to a much larger one or vice versa. The power of scale jumping is that small events can affect large ones, or a small or large phenomenon is exposed as limited because of its scale. The simple juxtaposition of things of vastly different sizes also implies a distinct kind of metonymy or transumptio that is similar to scale jumping. Papers are sought that examine the nature and effects of scale jumping in scientific, literary, historical, and artistic works.

Thread: Middle English Literature at Scale
Organizer: Matthew Boyd Goldie (Rider University)
Moderator: Matthew Boyd Goldie
Room: Northrop Frye 113

  1. Erika Harman (University of Pennsylvania), "Answers for Every Question: Encyclopedic Dialogues in Late Medieval England"
  2. Paul Holchak (Queens College, CUNY), "Scales of Performance in the Monastic Divine Service" 
  3. Joseph Morgan (Indiana University Bloomington), “Scale Jumping with Julian: Cosmic Collapse as Proof of Divine Love”
  4. Steven F. Kruger (Queens College and The Graduate Center, CUNY), “Scale Jumping and Non-Comparative Comparison in Medieval Dream Vision”

Session 11F: Digging up the Past: Memorialization, Inscription, and St. Erkenwald (Paper)                     
Organizers: The NCS Program Committee       
Moderators: Jordan Zweck (University of Wisconsin, Madison)
Room: Northrop Frye 119

  1. Sif Rikhardsdottir (University of Iceland), “Death as Remembrance: Time, Memory and the Sense of Pastness in St. Erkenwald and Egils saga Skallagrímssonar
  2. Michael Wehrman (Frostburg State University), “Meche memory and muddling was mellyd to-geder: Bede’s Two Erkenwalds and Their Roles in St. Erkenwald
  3. Jill Hamilton Clements (University of Alabama, Birmingham), “Remembering in Runes: The Written Body and the Illegible Dead in St. Erkenwald
  4. Jordan Kirk (Pomona College), “Roynyshe Resounes: St. Erkenwald on the Caracter

Session 11G: Living Research: Drama and Performance in Practice (Lightning)       

The two live dramatic productions that Toronto’s PLS brought to NCS 2016 — The Pride of Life and an impromptu site-specific Mankind — brought up a number of questions regarding the way that live production of late medieval plays might relate to the production of academic research in the field, whether or not it constitutes research in itself. This panel invites respondents to report on live productions of early plays or live performances/readings of any early text, emphasizing performances that have reached beyond campus; these short reports will be followed by an open discussion.

Please visit https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLMb9ZqJoyrS-VI1cXpNhaDO0-2dfK3kUr to view the video for this session.

Organizer: Matthew Sergi (University of Toronto)
Moderator: Matthew Sergi
Room: Victoria College 323

  1. Ernst Gerhardt (Laurentian University), “Playing with Food: The Towneley First Shepherds’ Play in Performance”
  2. Andrew Albin (Fordham University), “Frustrating Performances: Fordham Medieval Dramatists' Antichrist and the Language of Game”
  3. Olivia Robinson (University of Fribourg), “The Medieval Convent Drama Project: Gender, Performance and Research”
  4. Tricia Postle (University of Toronto), “Travels with a Werewolf: Performing the Lai de Bisclaveret
  5. Kyle A. Thomas (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), “Medieval/Postmodern Performance: Approaches to a Performance of the 12th-Century Play of Adam

Session 11H: Newer Materialisms (Paper)

Since the publication of Jane Bennett’s Vibrant Matter in 2010, medieval studies has witnessed an explosion of debate around the question of the ontology and agency of physical stuff in the Middle Ages. Five years after Bennett’s book, and roughly ten years after Speculative Realism, this panel aims to reassess the place of New Materialism within medieval studies. We welcome any abstracts that consider New Materialism as a field, but particularly welcome are papers that focus on its relation to other critical methodologies, on its historicity and/or historical roots, and on its possible futures. What was New Materialism before, and what is it now? What schisms exist within the field of New Materialism, as broadly defined? And to what extent has New Materialism learned from the critiques of other subfields—in particular, from historicist and Marxist critiques?

Organizer: Taylor Cowdery (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
Moderator: Taylor Cowdery
Room: Victoria College Chapel

  1. Myra Seaman (College of Charleston), “Not Aloof but OOF: Feminist Object Studies”
  2. Kellie Robertson (University of Maryland), “The Origins of Poetic Materialism”
  3. Respondent: Lisa H. Cooper (University of Wisconsin, Madison)

Session 11I: The Language of Birds (Paper)
Organizer: David K. Coley (Simon Fraser University)
Moderator: David K. Coley
Room: Victoria College 115

  1. Christopher Roman (Kent State University), “The Sounds of Chaucer's Dreamscapes”
  2. Liam Lewis (University of Warwick), “Quacking and Trapping: Mastering the Sounds of Birds in Bibbesworth's Tretiz
  3. Sarah Stanbury (College of the Holy Cross), “Birdsong and the Noises of Home in the Manciple's Tale

3:30-4:00    Break

4:00-5:30    Biennial Lecture and Closing: Maura Nolan, University of California, Berkeley (Isabel Bader Theatre), "The Invention of Style"

5:30-6:30    Transition Time

6:30-TBD    Dinner at the Toronto Reference Library

Schedule: 13 July

PDF OF FULL PROGRAM

9:00-10:30    SESSIONS: GROUP 6

Session 6A: Chaucer and Muslim Readers (Seminar)

This seminar brings together faculty and teachers interested in sharing and learning enhanced resources for students with backgrounds in Islam and Middle Eastern languages. Possible topics include three overlapping concerns. First, language: what are the consequences of students reading in Middle English, present-day English, and/or non-Anglophone translations? Second, resources: what is the quality of secondary resources and availability of textbooks? Third, transcultural awareness: what medieval English values, institutions, and practices are alien to Muslim and Middle Eastern students? Pedagogical practices explored in this seminar will be applicable to any twenty-first century classroom.

Thread: Chaucer Abroad                 
Organizer: Candace Barrington (Central Connecticut State University)
Moderator: Candace Barrington
Room: Victoria College 115

  1. Sherif Abdelkarim (University of Virginia), "On Understanding Chaucer, His Poetry, His World, and Ours"
  2. Burçin Erol (Hacettepe University), "Teaching Courtly Love to Turkish Students"

Session 6B: Fictionality II (Paper)

This panel invites reflection on the instructive role of feigned, imaginative, or counterfactual narratives in the later Middle Ages. While we often attribute an ethical, action-oriented function to medieval storytelling, this panel seeks to understand the philosophical dimensions of fiction, its role in truth-telling and intellectual inquiry. How, presenters might ask, do fictional stories construct or organize knowledge? What types of knowledge (empathic, mystical, natural, etc.) does fiction especially generate? If Middle English literature should both entertain and instruct, how might humor, fantasy, or suspense generate particular ways of knowing? Likewise, how could the truth-telling or knowledge-construction within fiction be a source of delight?

Thread: Forming Knowledge
Organizer: Mary Raschko (Whitman College)
Moderator: Mary Raschko
Room: Victoria College 215

  1. Rebecca Krug (University of Minnesota), "Lions Can't Eat Virgins? Questions, Propositions, and Late Medieval Storytelling"
  2. Jessica Lockhart (University of Toronto), "Wonders in the Weir: Chaucer’s Fiction and Late Medieval Riddling"
  3. Robyn Malo (Purdue University), "Chaucer and the Consolation of Narrative"

Session 6C: Periodization, "Medieval" to "Renaissance" (Paper)

Medieval studies has not been entirely well-served by traditional periodization, since the med/Ren divide produces a kind of opposition: religious, communal, boring vs. secular, individual, new. And so in the last 20–30 years medievalists have attempted to break down (or through) this divide. In response to such volumes as Brian Cummings and James Simpson’s (eds.) Cultural Reformations, it is now worth asking whether what is gained by this revision is greater than what is lost. This session seeks position papers on the topic of periodization that address questions such as: Does one need an idea of the Middle Ages in order to teach and study it? What would replace traditional periodization were we to dispense with it? Does periodization prioritize certain kinds of historical change, and, if so, what are they and why? Is the term used in recent English histories of drama—Tudor—more or less helpful?

Thread: History Now
Organizer: Katie Little (University of Colorado, Boulder)
Moderator: Theresa Coletti (University of Maryland, College Park)
Room: Victoria College 323

  1. Jeff Espie (University of British Columbia), "Chaucer, Spenser, and the Cut of History"
  2. William Revere (University of North Carolina, Asheville), "Imagining Community in Medieval Fictions: Chaucer to More"
  3. Matthew Evan Davis (McMaster University), "The 'Tudor' Misnomer: Periodization as Incidental Side-Effect of Religious Reform"

Session 6D: Implications of French-English Bilingualism (Paper)

Recent work in cultural history and sociolinguistics suggests that the extent of Francophonie in England before 1400 may have been substantially underestimated. This session is designed to encourage consideration of the cultural and social implications of French-English bilingualism in the age of Chaucer, and reconsideration of textual evidence that may have been interpreted in the past to fit the seductive narrative of French’s decline as an English vernacular. Contributors may also wish to discuss the intellectual implications of bridging the disciplinary gaps between English Studies and French Studies, or indeed those between literary and linguistic scholarship

Thread: Language Contacts           
Organizer: Ardis Butterfield (Yale University)
Moderator: Ardis Butterfield
Room: Victoria College 212

  1. Jonathan Fruoco (Université Grenoble Alpes), "Bilingualism and Social Snobbery in Medieval England"
  2. Thomas Hinton (University of Exeter), "French Pedagogy in Thirteenth-Century England: Walter de Bibbesworth's Tretiz"
  3. Philip Knox (Trinity College, Cambridge), "Multiliteracies: Dialects and Scriptae of French in Late Medieval England"
  4. Elizaveta Strakhov (Marquette University), "'Cest tout': French Rubrics for English Poetry in Thomas Hoccleve’s Huntington Holograph Manuscripts"

Session 6E: Mapping London Textual Production (Paper)

The institutions of medieval London and its surrounds—the Guildhall, the Privy Seal, the Livery Companies, the Priory of St. Mary Overie, etc.—have played increasingly important roles in recent accounts of the careers of Chaucer, Gower, Langland, Hoccleve, and other authors, and of the transmission of their works. This panel invites papers reconsidering the role of London's institutions in our assessment of Middle English literature. Suggested topics might include: archival discoveries, reassessments of current work on such topics, the relationship between "literary" and governmental/legal modes of textual production, and what difference all this makes to Middle English studies.

Thread: Making the Text           
Organizer: Lawrence Warner (King’s College London)
Moderator: Lawrence Warner
Room: Emmanuel College 119

  1. Sonja Drimmer (University of Massachusetts Amherst), "'A Connoisseurship of Words': Paleography, Art History, and Manuscripts of Middle English Verse"
  2. Matthew Fisher (University of California, Los Angeles), "'Librum meum de Canterbury Tales': The Chancery and Chaucer’s Other Scribe"
  3. Sebastian Sobecki (University of Groningen), "George Ashby's Autograph Hand"

Session 6F: Chaucer and Rape: The Wife of Bath’s Prologue and Tale (Lightning)
Organizer: Carissa Harris (Temple University)
Moderator: Samantha Katz Seal (University of New Hampshire)
Room: Victoria College Chapel

  1. Derrick Pitard (Slippery Rock University), "Elves, Friars, Folktales, and Lust"
  2. Elizabeth Harper (Mercer University), "'Don't Be That Knight': Rape, Rehabilitation, and Teaching the Wife of Bath's Tale"
  3. William M. Storm (Eastern University), "Speaking on Behalf of the Maiden: The Trauma of Speech in the Wife of Bath's Tale"

Session 6G: New Ideas in Manuscript Studies I (Paper)

Definition of the "new field" of manuscript studies inaugurated by Doyle and Parkes in 1978 (Kerby-Fulton et al.) remains a process: the study of manuscripts has generated evidence about scribes, communities of scribes and readers, book producers, interactions between authors and scribes, and audience reception of texts; those concerns now overlap in discussions of evidence for scribal attribution, the readership of medieval texts, loci of textual transmission, editorial practice, and other issues. This session invites discussion of newly articulated evidence and newly recognized overlaps in manuscript study: descriptions of the as-yet unexplored ways in which their evidence can generate knowledge about medieval textual production.

Organizer: Thomas J. Farrell (Stetson University)
Moderator: Thomas J. Farrell
Room: Victoria College 101

  1. Stephen Partridge (University of British Columbia), “New Ideas (and Facts) about the Part-Divisions in the Man of Law's Tale
  2. Rebecca Huffman (University of Michigan), “The Tale of a Manual: Longleat MS 29 and the Anonymous Parson's Tale
  3. Daniel Wakelin (University of Oxford), “Scribes against Novelty”

Session 6H: Surveillance: Guarding Virtue (Paper)

Although surveillance is increasingly intrusive in our own lives, it's hardly a new phenomenon or concern. Medieval surveillance occurred pre-digitally, but various technologies, strategies, and social/political/religious relations made it possible, even sometimes imperative.  Considerations of surveillance in a wide range of times, places, languages, and texts are particularly encouraged. Presentations might consider: What are some of the ways surveillant processes occurred in the Middle Ages? What are some of the ways the (post-modern) present surveils the medieval past? What terms or concepts from contemporary Surveillance Studies are useful for thinking about surveillance in the Middle Ages?

Organizer: Sylvia Tomasch (Hunter College, CUNY)
Moderator: Sylvia Tomasch
Room: Northrop Frye 113

  1. Gina A. Dominick (New York University), "Aesthetics and "Surveiaunce" in the Physician’s Tale"
  2. Jennifer N. Brown (Marymount Manhattan College), "Surveillance among Sisters: The Case of the Syon Additions"
  3. Annette Kern-Staehler (University of Bern), "The Bishop’s Spies: Surveillance in Late Medieval Monastic Houses"

Session 6I: The Expressive Agency of Trees in Medieval Literature (Paper)
Organizer: NCS Program Committee
Moderator: Mo Pareles (University of British Columbia)
Northrop Frye 119

  1. Valerie B. Johnson (University of Montevallo), "Gnarled Rhizome: Chaucerian Forests as Networked Objects"
  2. Timothy S. Miller (Sarah Lawrence College), "The Speaking Plant: Translating Vegetal Languages in Middle English"
  3. Sarah Breckenridge Wright (Duquesne University), "Chaucer’s Apocalyptic Parliament: Eschatological Trees in the Parliament of Fowls"

10:30-11:00     Break

11:00-12:30    SESSIONS: GROUP 7

Session 7A: The Medieval Elsewhere: Australia, Israel, the Americas (Paper)
Thread: Chaucer Abroad
Organizer: NCS Program Committee
Moderator: Bruce Holsinger (University of Virginia)
Room: Victoria College 215

  1. Louise D'Arcens (Macquarie University), "Medievalism and the Coeval: Indigenous Cinema and the Narration of Pre-Contact Time"
  2. Jonathan Stavsky (Tel Aviv University), "The Parson Goes to Jerusalem: Anti-Orthodox Parody and the Limits of Secularism in Shimon Sandbank's Hebrew Translation of the Canterbury Tales"
  3. Nancy Bradley Warren (Texas A&M University), Hemispheric Medievalisms:  The "Old Religion" and the Making of Early Modern America

Session 7B: Carnal Knowledge (Lightning)

If, as Carolyn Dinshaw has argued, the body is “a field on which issues of representation and interpretation are literally and metaphorically played out,” how might we account for acts of carnal exploration and violation as forays into such a hermeneutic field? This session invites lightning talks on diverse modes of carnal apprehension in the later Middle Ages—from Thomas’s doubt to surgeons’ probing, from physiognomic treatises to lyrics about sexual violence, in which female speakers present their bodily trauma as a privileged form of knowledge about class and gender inequalities. In these and other texts, how is knowledge of the body newly grasped through (for instance) intimate observation, suffering, or intrusion? How are these processes implicated in the knowledge-work of texts and textual genres? How are medieval thinkers’ bodies implicated in the knowledge they produce?

Thread: Forming Knowledge 
Organizers: Joe Stadolnik (University College London); Carissa M. Harris (Temple University)
Moderator: Joe Stadolnik
Room: Victoria College Chapel

  1. Helen Cushman (Harvard University), "Tangible Knowledge"
  2. Suzanne M. Edwards (Lehigh University), "Apprehending God"
  3. Marian Homans-Turnbull (UC Berkeley), "Foreknowledge of Bodies in Chaucer's Physician's Tale"
  4. Rachel Levinson-Emley (University of California Santa Barbara), "Women's Secrets: Medieval Female Medical Writers and Narrative Medicine"
  5. Roberta Magnani (Swansea University), "The Wife of Bath’s Epistemology of Experience: Spiritual and Carnal Intersections"
  6. Mariah Junglan Min (University of Pennsylvania), "Whither Thou, Ghost: Sir Orfeo and the Knowledge of Death"
  7. Carolyn Dinshaw (New York University), Response

Session 7C: Aureation (Paper)

Fifteenth-century English writers admired a heavily Latinate style of poetry and prose that one of them (John Metham) called “half-chongyd Latyn.” Where did this style come from, where did it go, why was it valued, and what does it tell us about literary form and practice in the last medieval century? This session invites papers on the linguistic structure and language politics of aureate poetry, drama, macaronic preaching, and religious, historical, or utilitarian prose in fifteenth-century England and on comparable linguistic and stylistic phenomena in other languages, centuries and places.

Thread: Language Contacts
Organizer: Nicholas Watson (Harvard University)
Moderator: Catherine Sanok (University of Michigan)
Room: Victoria College 115

  1. Amanda Walling (University of Hartford), "Towards an Ethics of the Aureate"
  2. Sarah Star (Kenyon College), "The 'almost-Latin' Medical Language of Late Medieval England"
  3. Christopher Cannon (Johns Hopkins University), "Latin English"

Session 7D: Scribal Grammar, Scribal Poetics (Lightning)

Nearly forty years ago, Doyle and Parkes observed that a work’s “layout and decoration function like punctuation” since they guide the reader’s interaction with the text. This recognition continues to encourage the reevaluation of scribal acts, as such features are often altered—or duplicated by design—with each recopying. This seminar explores how we might define the grammatical function of rubrication, script hierarchies, paraph marks, initials, etc., either within a single manuscript or across a range of manuscripts. Did communities develop their own scribal “grammars” of layout and/or decoration? Did they share these communicative systems through copying, or was each scribal utterance constitutive of a new idiolectical grammar? How might the fields of semiotics and linguistics, or others, help explain how scribes “made” the texts they copied out, and/or to theorize the scribal act more broadly?

Thread: Making the Text
Organizers: Heather Blatt (Florida International University); Sarah Noonan (Saint Mary's College, Notre Dame); Aditi Nafde (Newcastle University); Jenni Nuttall (University of Oxford)
Moderator: Jenni Nuttall
Room: Victoria College 101

  1. Colette Moore (University of Washington), "Mise-en-page, Information Structure, Information Design"
  2. Emily Mahan (University of Notre Dame), "Visual Pragmatics of a Multilingual Manuscript: The Scribe's Stance"
  3. Ruen-chuan Ma (Utah Valley University), "The Visual Grammar of the Thebaid Summary in Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde"
  4. Elon Lang (University of Texas at Austin), "Dotting ‘I’s and Taking Names: Punctuators and Annotators in BL MS Harley 4286"
  5. Mary C. Flannery, "'Thy wyf I saugh hym…[?]': Obscenity and Scribal Play in the Hengwrt MS"
  6. David Watt (University of Manitoba), "Edifying Verse: Structure and Integrity in Thomas Hoccleve’s Stanzas"

Session 7E: Cosmic Scale: Astronomical Thinking (Paper)

Astronomy mediates between the very large and the very small. Troilus laughs at “this litel spot of erthe,” as seen from the heavens. But an astrolabe places the celestial sphere in the palm of one’s hand. Astronomical tools such as the Alphonsine Tables could calculate up to 80,000 years’ worth of celestial movements, but the Clerk of Orleans uses them to find the exact moment that Brittany’s black rocks are likely to be hidden. This panel welcomes papers that use astronomy to think about scale. How can astronomy help us understand literature that mediates or moves between vastly different scales? Does astronomy supply medieval poets with a language for thinking about scale? If it is possible to read on a cosmic scale, can we also see the stars on a literary scale? 

Thread: Middle English Literature at Scale
Organizer: Kara Gaston, University of Toronto
Moderator: Kara Gaston
Room: Victoria College 212

  1. Amanda Gerber (UCLA), "Learning the Tropes: Chaucer’s Lesson in Classical Cosmography"
  2. William Green (University of British Columbia), "'Al is thurgh constellacion': (Re-)Writing the Heavens in the Late Middle Ages"
  3. David Wilton (Texas A&M University), "The Colors of Illusion: Astronomy, Magic, and Poetics in the Franklin’s Tale"
  4. Sheri Smith (Heinrich Heine Universität, Düsseldorf), "A Grain of Sand and a Flight through the Spheres: Poetry as Cosmic Disorientation in Chaucer's House of Fame"

Session 7F: Advice from Book Series Editors and Publishers 
Organizer: NCS Program Committee
Moderator: Robert J. Meyer-Lee (Agnes Scott College)
Room: Emmanuel College 119

  1. Anke Bernau, Manchester University Press, Manchester Medieval Literature and Culture Series
  2. Helen Fulton, University of Wales Press, New Century Chaucer Series
  3. Caroline Palmer, Boydell and Brewer, Chaucer Studies Series
  4. Fred Unwalla, Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies
  5. Daniel Wakelin, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature Series
  6. Bonnie Wheeler, Palgrave Macmillan, The New Middle Ages Series

Session 7G: Affect Matters: Historicizing Feeling in the Age of Chaucer II  (Paper)

In this session we seek to historicize medieval affect. Papers might consider the following questions:  Is there a specifically Chaucerian affect that develops through Chaucer’s particular engagements with the genres of dream vision and fin amor, or through the “impersonated artistry” of The Canterbury Tales, or in the later construction of “Father Chaucer” by English and Scottish poets following him? What are the relationships between form and affect in Chaucer’s poetry and in that of his contemporaries? To what extent are objects and material contexts crucial for affective interaction in late medieval poetry? What are the mutually constitutive relationships between gender and affect in late medieval poetry? How does affect matter in the construction of religious identity; can we speak of a specifically Jewish or Muslim affect?

Organizer: Glenn Burger (Queens College and The Graduate Center, CUNY); Holly Crocker (University of South Carolina)
Moderator: Glenn Burger
Room: Victoria College 323

  1. Sarah McNamer (Georgetown University), "'Critical Feeling' as Chaucerian Affect"
  2. Ryan Smith (University at Buffalo), "Chivalrous Fulfillment: Knightly Subjectivity and Clerical Form"

Session 7H: Anger and the Summoner's Tale (Paper)
Organizer: NCS Program Committee
Moderator: John F. Plummer (Vanderbilt University)
Room: Emmanuel College 302

  1. Thomas Goodmann (University of Miami), "The Fraternal Paradox: Limning the Friars"
  2. Aled Roberts (Columbia University), "Be war from ire: Air, Ire and Irrationality in Chaucer’s Summoner’s Tale"
  3. Randy Schiff (University at Buffalo, SUNY), "Cultivating Empathy through Quiting: The Telling Fury of the Friar and Summoner"

Session 7I: Forms of Middle English Prayer I (Paper)

The history of Middle English lyric is indivisible from the history of prayer. Prayers for spiritual clarity resemble lyrics seeking affective catharsis, while Middle English poets are as likely to call for saintly intercession as to beg a patron’s assistance. This panel aims to explore the intersection of these two modes of language performance and to consider how their kinship might provide insight into broader questions of poetics and religion in later medieval literature. We welcome papers that consider any aspect of the relationship between prayer and lyric, but the following questions might serve as a starting point. To what extent do prayer and lyric share a common style, voice, form, or affect? Is Middle English “prayere” or “orisoun” a form distinct from Latin “oratio” or French “preiere”? Finally, is it more useful to distinguish between “secular” and “sacred” poetics in Middle English lyric or to dissolve this distinction?

Organizers: Taylor Cowdery (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill); Megan Murton (Catholic University of America)
Moderator: Megan Murton
Room: Northrop Frye 113

  1. DeVan Ard (University of Virginia), "Speaker, Voice, and Pray-er in Harley MS 2253"
  2. Amy Appleford (Boston University), "'Behold, my life is but a distraction'"
  3. Shannon Gayk (Indiana University), "Clad in Christ’s Skin: The Haptic Poetics of Middle English Prayer Rolls"

Session 7J: Making Room for Chaucer in Secondary Schools (Seminar)

How can we make space for medieval literature in secondary school classrooms where literary content is constantly shrinking? There is strong evidence that students who study Chaucer in high school are more likely to take medieval studies classes in college. Seminar participants will examine data on secondary schools that teach Chaucer and investigate strategies to encourage more schools to follow suit. Which curricula encourage the study of literature prior to 1600 and how do they incorporate Chaucer into the broad literary surveys typical of high school? How do academically rigorous testing programs (AP and IB) as well as high stakes testing (PARCC and Smarter Balanced) impact curricular content? What role does translation play in teaching Chaucer to high school students? And how do teacher education programs play a role in fostering or dismissing the belief that Chaucer is well-suited for high school curricula?

Organizers: Jessica Rezunyk (Upper Canada College); Lee Read (Wilde Lake High School)
Moderator: Lee Read
Room: Northrop Frye 119

  1. Vincent Lankewish (Professional Performing Arts High School), "Chaucer in a New York City Public High School"
  2. Mary Kay Waterman (The Lovett School), "'Diverse practyk in sondry werkes': A Shift in Practice"
  3. David Raybin (Eastern Illinois University), "From High School to College"

12:30-2:00    Lunch

2:00-3:30    SESSIONS: GROUP 8

Session 8A: Metrolingualism (Lightning)

What happens to language in cities? Mindful of, but looking beyond, Chaucer’s multilingual London, this session encourages submissions that consider cities within and outside Chaucer’s ambit as sites of linguistic plurality and layering. How are languages networked in the pre-modern world—and in urban space in particular? How do languages signal the existence of other languages beyond themselves? Are individual languages clearly distinguished and differentiated from each other, or are the boundaries between them porous and labile? Are languages self-aware? Papers might explore specialized professional languages, linguistic mash-ups and calques, multi-lingual actors and the perils (or pleasures) of monolingualism, or the ways that language is deployed to travel in particular urban environments in late-medieval cultures.

Thread: Chaucer Abroad
Organizer: Karla Mallette (University of Michigan)
Moderator: David Wallace (University of Pennsylvania)
Room: Victoria College Chapel

  1. Emily Dolmans (Exeter College, University of Oxford), "England's Border Literatures: Language Between Cultures"
  2. Elaine Treharne (Stanford University), "The Linguistic Cityscape of 'Mydeel Engelond' in Medieval Leicester"
  3. Karla Taylor (University of Michigan), "Chaucer's Alibi"
  4. Susan Phillips (Northwestern University), "The Shipman’s Tale: A Metrolingual Textbook on Late Medieval Debt"
  5. David Lawton (Washington University in St. Louis), "Metronumeracies"
  6. Susan Nakley (St. Joseph's College, New York), "Cruel City: the Prioress Expands Latin Territory"

Session 8B: Medieval Technocultures I (Paper)

Chaucer’s Treatise on the Astrolabe finds itself in the midst of a “techno turn” in which functional interfaces, instruments, and techno-scientific ways of knowing are gaining new prominence. Medieval technocultures will explore animating features of early devices, technics, or analytics. We invite presenters to take up such topics as physical media, visual diagrams, haptic feedback, literacy/numeracy, and their effects in and for literary history. We welcome those who stretch or bend the format to incorporate demos, models, ficto-criticism, interviews, the biography of an object, or intellectual geography. Speakers will, broadly speaking, address medieval techno-sciences that tend to propagate object-dependent knowledges. How is information located in an instrument, system, or praxis? Where is science situated?

Thread: Forming Knowledge
Organizers: Jenna Mead (University of Western Australia); Allan Mitchell (University of Victoria)
Moderator: Allan Mitchell
Room: Victoria College 323

  1. Anke Bernau (University of Manchester), "Measuring Entanglements"
  2. Heidi Støa (Indiana University), "The Squire's Tale of Attraction"
  3. Kathleen Tonry (University of Connecticut), "Agency and Instrumentality: The Debate of the Carpenter's Tools"

Session 8C: Chaucer and Church History (Paper)

This panel explores Chaucer’s relationship to church history. How, we ask, did the ecclesiological upheavals of Chaucer’s era mark his conception of the church as a historical entity? Or, from a different point of view, how might the history of the English Church in the fourteenth, fifteenth, sixteenth, and seventeenth centuries have determined the formation of English literary history grounded in Chaucer’s poetry? In what ways might church history be the driver of both periodization and literary history?

Thread: History Now
Organizers: James Simpson (Harvard University); Zachary E. Stone (University of Virginia)
Moderator: Zachary E. Stone
Room: Victoria College 101

  1. Andrew Lynch (University of Western Australia), "Chaucer as Catholic 'Child' in Nineteenth-Century England"
  2. Chase Padusniak (Princeton University), "Chaucer's Pardoner: Life, Death, Ecclesia
  3. Lora Walsh (University of Arkansas), "Defying Periodization: Literary Representations of 'Church History' in Trans-Reformation England"

Session 8D: Anglo-Latin (Paper)

As recent interventions by Joseph Farrell, Andrew Galloway, and Nicholas Watson (among others) have helped to make clear, the status of Latin in the later Middle Ages was far more vexed than earlier historiographies allow. Yet, if we can no longer simply consider the relationship between Latin and the vernacular in terms of familiar binaries (of gender, power, culture, etc.), how should we formulate a more rigorously historicized (or otherwise theorized) account of Latin in late-medieval England? This panel seeks papers that, in addressing this question, focus on specific Anglo-Latin authors (e.g., Grosseteste, Rolle, Gower), on Latinate literary trends and discourses (e.g., neoclassicism, scholastic exegesis, liturgical compositions), on works that mix Latin and the vernaculars, or on the place of Latin texts in specific plurilingual manuscripts. Relatedly, papers are also encouraged on the Latinity of Middle English studies in the last century (or more).

Thread: Language Contacts
Organizer: Andrew Kraebel (Trinity University)
Moderator: Andrew Galloway (Cornell University)
Room: Victoria College 212

  1. Venetia Bridges (Durham University), "Proverbial Problems: Latin Sapientia or English Wisdom?"
  2. Michael Van Dussen (McGill University), "Anglo-Latin Abroad: Richard Rolle in Central Europe"
  3. Stephanie Batkie (University of the South), "Let’s Talk Leonines: Listening to Forms in Gower’s Vox Clamantis"

Session 8E: Transcription Now (Paper)

Medieval literary study relies on transcription, yet we seldom reflect on or esteem it. It has been done by unacknowledged Victorian women, by untenured postdocs on professors’ grants, or by workers in the developing world building corpora of big data. Is it menial drudgery or an intellectual achievement? Is the process itself enlightening, or just a means to an end? Do digital methods offer more accuracy? Or does transcribing depend on interpretation for solving textual cruces, recognizing form, choosing the limits of the text? Why reproduce some letterforms but not others? Are abbreviations meaningful or expendable—expandable? And transcription seems like a quest for sameness, but it implies transferral, transition, difference. Need it always entail “accuracy”—and accuracy in what? Might “mistranscription,” like “mistranslation,” be rewarding too?

Thread: Making the Text
Organizer: Daniel Wakelin (University of Oxford)
Moderator: Daniel Wakelin
Room: Emmanuel College 302

  1. Daniel Sawyer (University of Oxford), "Whittling the Wycliffite Bible: Transcription's Sharp Ends"
  2. Justyna Rogos-Hebda (Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan), "Toeing the Line: On Transcribing Horizontal Strokes in English and Latin MSS of Richard Rolle’s Emendatio Vitae"
  3. Joel Fredell (Southeastern University), "Transcribing Middle English for Digital Display"

Session 8F: Powers of Speech: Women, Language and Public Culture in Late Medieval England (Paper)
Organizer: NCS Program Committee
Moderator: Geoffrey Gust (Stockton University)
Room: Northrop Frye 113

  1. Alastair Bennett (Royal Holloway, University of London), "The Man of Law and the Art of Prayer"
  2. Roger Nicholson (University of Auckland), "In/constant Queens and Consorts:  Creating and Containing Public Strife in Late Medieval England"
  3. Lainie Pomerleau (University of Georgia), "Commonplaces for the Uncommonly Placed: Medieval English Queens and their Books of Hours"

Session 8G: Practicing Patience in the Middle Ages (Lightning)

Patience is a complex and even paradoxical virtue. It intersects with agency and, to borrow Sara Ahmed’s term, willfulness, but it is also defined by restraint. It can describe an immediate response and/or a sustained practice. It involves affect as well as intellect. It exists on a continuum (someone can have no, little, or much patience), yet it exhibits a tipping point (when it runs out or is lost). This session invites short papers exploring the nature of medieval patience and its performance in secular and devotional contexts.

Organizer: Tara Williams (Oregon State University)
Moderator: Tara Williams
Room: Victoria College 215

  1. Jessica Barr (University of Massachusetts, Amherst), "How Long, O Lord? Mystical Impatience and the Will of God"
  2. Sara Torres (University of Virginia), "Peace, Patience, and Poetic Vocality in Gower’s Verse"
  3. Jasmin Miller (University of California, Berkeley), "The Moral Ambiguity of Griselda's 'Pacience'"
  4. Colin Fewer (Purdue University Northwest), "Patience and Masculinity in Hoccleve"
  5. Elliot Kendall (University of Exeter), "Chaucerian Patience and Stephen Hawes at Court"

Session 8H: Reimagining Invention (Lightning)

This session welcomes papers that work to reimagine our understanding of concepts of invention in late medieval writing. While papers might of course consider invention in the sense of rhetorical inventio, this session particularly invites papers that can help us deepen, expand, or otherwise reconceptualize the way in which late medieval writers and texts variously address, represent, or enact the processes by which poetry or prose comes into being. In short, how might late medieval texts encourage us to consider “invention” more broadly? Papers might examine questions of (re)definition (what is, or was, invention?); terminology (what exactly is involved in a term like fyndyng, for example?); theory (what aspects of contemporary theory might help us productively reconceptualize invention?); meta-representation (how do writers depict processes of invention in texts?); pedagogy (how might a reimagined understanding of medieval invention help us reconsider our own approaches to teaching writing?); and other related questions.

Organizer: Steele Nowlin (Pennsylvania State University)
Moderator: Steele Nowlin
Room: Northrop Frye 119

  1. Orietta Da Rold (University of Cambridge), "'Right as our first letter is now an A': Invention in Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde"
  2. Chad Schrock (Lee University), "Chaucer's Biblical Invention"
  3. Jacqueline M. Burek (George Mason University), "Historiographical Invention"
  4. Samuel F. McMillan (Pennsylvania State University), "The Unreasonable Invention of the Roman de la rose"
  5. Juliette Vuille (University of Lausanne), "Chaucer's Metapoetic Messengers and Poetic Inventio"

Session 8I: Surveillance: Narratives (Paper)

Although surveillance is increasingly intrusive in our own lives, it's hardly a new phenomenon or concern. Medieval surveillance occurred pre-digitally, but various technologies, strategies, and social/political/religious relations made it possible, even sometimes imperative.  Considerations of surveillance in a wide range of times, places, languages, and texts are particularly encouraged. Presentations might consider: What are some of the ways surveillant processes occurred in the Middle Ages? What are some of the ways the (post-modern) present surveils the medieval past? What terms or concepts from contemporary Surveillance Studies are useful for thinking about surveillance in the Middle Ages?

Organizer: Sylvia Tomasch (Hunter College (CUNY))
Moderator: Sylvia Tomasch 
Room: Emmanuel College 119

  1. Andrew Taylor (University of Ottawa), "Concealing, Revealing, Spying, and Foreseeing in Froissart’s Journey to the Court of Gaston Fébus"
  2. Matthew Scribner (Carleton University and Algonquin College), "Gender, Hegemony, and Surveillance in the Tristan Romances"
  3. Sheila Coursey (University of Michigan), "'And for his sake to help his neighbor': Nice Wanton and Neighborhood Surveillance"
  4. Karma Lochrie (Indiana University Bloomington), "'Privé or apert':  Domestic Surveillance in Late Medieval England"

Session 8J: The Squire and His Tale: “Ernest” or “Game”? (Position)

The Squire’s Tale is the poster child for the historical variability of Chaucer reception. Treasured by Milton and Spenser, the tale was near universally considered to be either a staged or actual failure through several decades in the middle of the twentieth century. More recent work exploring the tale’s psychological, cultural, social, environmental, and geopolitical implications has upended that consensus, yet doubt about its “high seriousness” remains, even in some of this very work. This session seeks papers that take new approaches in formulating an answer to the question posed by the session’s title.

Organizer: Robert J. Meyer-Lee (Agnes Scott College)
Moderator: Robert J. Meyer-Lee
Room: Victoria College 115

  1. Kenneth Bleeth (Connecticut College), "The Rhetoric of Narration in the Squire's Tale"
  2. Megan Murton (The Catholic University of America), "The Squire's Tale: 'Ernest' Failure as Narrative Experiment" 
  3. B.S.W. Barootes (University of Toronto), "'In fair and fresche atyre": The Squire’s Tale as a Source for the Kingis Quair"
  4. Ruth Nisse (Wesleyan University), "The Last Ides of March'
  5. Justin Barker (Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts), "The Squire's Tale as a Chaucerian Philosophy of Poetic Interpretation?"

3:30-5:30    Special Event at Art Gallery of Ontario - Medieval Ethiopian Manuscripts

5:30-7:00    Transition time

7:00-9:00    Performance of Wahala Dey O!

Schedule: 12 July

PDF OF FULL PROGRAM

9:00-10:30    SESSIONS: GROUP 3

Session 3A: Border-Crossings: Chaucer's Italy (Lightning)

This session will focus on geographical, conceptual, political, and aesthetic “border-crossings” which Chaucer carried out on diplomatic trips to Italy (1372–78) and upon his return. Papers might address his acts of diplomacy on behalf of Edward III and Richard II; late medieval English constructions of and/or commerce with “Ytaille;” the trecento reception of English diplomats and visitors; learning/speaking Italian in late medieval London; or Italian merchant reading communities and copyists, among other topics. They could also address, as intellectual and aesthetic border-crossings, Chaucer’s “translations” of Boccaccio’s writings, poetics, and theories of the vernacular as a means of negotiating with/contesting Dante.

Thread: Chaucer Abroad
Organizer: Kathryn McKinley (University of Maryland, Baltimore County)
Moderator: Kathryn McKinley
Room: Victoria College 115

  1. Zachary E. Stone (University of Virginia), "Oother art—Chaucer’s Lynyan and Alternative Italies"
  2. Teresa Russo (University of Toronto), "Literary Structure and 'serial loci' in Chaucer’s Knight’s Tale and Boccaccio’s Teseida"
  3. John Ganim (University of California, Riverside), "Nice Work If You Can Get It: Poetics and Effort in Boccaccio and Chaucer"
  4. Roberta Marangi (University of Geneva), "Incipit et Explicit Vox Nova: Chaucer’s Narratorial Voice as Poet"
  5. William Caferro (Vanderbilt University), "Chaucer, Hawkwood, Sabraham and the English Embassy to Milan, 1378"

Session 3B: Fictionality I (Paper)

This panel invites reflection on the instructive role of feigned, imaginative, or counterfactual narratives in the later Middle Ages. While we often attribute an ethical, action-oriented function to medieval storytelling, this panel seeks to understand the philosophical dimensions of fiction, its role in truth-telling and intellectual inquiry. How, presenters might ask, do fictional stories construct or organize knowledge? What types of knowledge (empathic, mystical, natural, etc.) does fiction especially generate? If Middle English literature should both entertain and instruct, how might humor, fantasy, or suspense generate particular ways of knowing? Likewise, how could the truth-telling or knowledge-construction within fiction be a source of delight?

Thread: Forming Knowledge
Organizer: Mary Raschko (Whitman College)
Moderator: Mary Raschko
Room: Victoria College 323

  1. Julie Orlemanski (University of Chicago), "Did the Middle Ages Believe in the Their Exempla?"
  2. Taylor Cowdery (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill), "False Universals in Chaucer's General Prologue"
  3. Katharine Breen (Northwestern University), "Minimal Fictions"

Session 3C: Eco-Chaucer: Transhistorical Readings of the Sacred, Sovereign, and Secular (Lightning)

Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales stages the competing claims of the sacred and secular in a manner prescient of our contemporary debates over land sovereignty, environmental devastation, and the value of place. What has Chaucerian writing to offer our environmental debates today, and—in the spirit of temporal reciprocity—what might an environmentally aware readership bring to an understanding of the late medieval contexts of Chaucer’s own work? This session will bring together environmental activism with the Book of Nature, indigenous epistemologies with Gene(sis)idal pre-modern European understandings of the relationship between homo and natura, and Chaucerian close reading with ecocritical theoretical framing.

Thread: History Now
Organizer: Robert Rouse (University of British Columbia)
Moderator: Robert Barrett (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)
Room: Victoria College 101

  1. Brantley Bryant (Sonoma State University), "The Sea That Greedy Is: Chaucerian Water Politics"
  2. Noelle Phillips (Douglas College), "Outside the Walled Garden: Nature, Environment, and Chaucerian Feminism"
  3. Clare Davidson (University of Western Australia), "In Defence of the Cuckoo: Natural Selection in the Parliament of Fowls"
  4. Gillian Rudd (University of Liverpool), "Time for Trees: How the 2017 Charter for Trees May Help Read Chaucer, and Vice-Versa"
  5. Mo Pareles (University of British Columbia), "Eldum swa unnyt: Mining Old English in Anthropocene Canada"
  6. Daniel Remein (University of Massachusetts), "Fish Stories"

Session 3D: Language Contact and Language Change (Paper)
Thread: Language Contacts
Organizer: NCS Program Committee
Moderator: Simon Meecham-Jones (University of Cambridge)
Room: Victoria College 212

  1. T. W. Machan (University of Notre Dame), "Writing Linguistic History: The Marches"
  2. Nicholas Myklebust (Regis University), "Anglo-Scottish Borderlands: A Fifteenth-Century Metrical Invention"
  3. Andrew Galloway (Cornell University), “Lyric Noise”

Session 3E: Transcription Then (Paper)
Thread: Making the Text
Organizer: Daniel Wakelin (University of Oxford)
Moderator: Daniel Wakelin
Room: Emmanuel College 302

  1. Thomas J. Farrell (Stetson University), "Scribal Accuracy in the Copying of the Reeve's Tale"
  2. Mayumi Taguchi & Satoko Tokunaga (Osaka Sangyo University, Keio University), "Transcription of Printed books: Compositors, Correctors and Editors"
  3. Akiyuki Jimura (Okayama University of Science), "A New Approach to the Manuscripts and Editions of the Canterbury Tales"

Session 3F: Imagined Pasts and Possible Futures (Paper)

This session invites papers exploring the long temporal scale of the medieval literary imagination, and especially the ways in which medieval cultures imagined their own pasts. Papers might consider a work featuring time travel or a long internal temporal scale, such as legends of the Seven Sleepers, or texts that revisit England’s pre-Conquest past (such as St. Erkenwald or perhaps Athelston). In examining how medieval texts memorialize the past and imagine the future, we might uncover how medieval peoples conceived of time, memory, the archive, and periods.

Thread: Middle English Literature at Scale
Organizer: Jordan Zweck (University of Wisconsin, Madison)
Moderator: Jordan Zweck
Room: Victoria College 215

  1. Cynthia Turner Camp (University of Georgia), "The 'Just decimacioun' of Historical Progress in Lydgate’s 'Austin at Compton'"
  2. David K. Coley (Simon Fraser University), "Back to the Future: Negotiating Traumatic Pasts in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight"
  3. Darragh Greene (University College Dublin), "'Though I by ordre telle nat thise thynges': Time, Tragedy, and the Monk’s Tale"

Session 3G: 40 Years of Studies in the Age of Chaucer 
Organizer: Sarah Salih (King’s College London); Studies in the Age of Chaucer
Moderator: Sarah Salih
Room: Victoria College Chapel

  1. David Matthews (University of Manchester)           
  2. Paul Strohm (Columbia University)
  3. Bridget Whearty (Binghamton University, SUNY)

Session 3H: Chaucer and Transgender Studies (Lightning)

Gender transformation is a recurrent motif in medieval literature and culture, from retellings of Ovid’s Metamorphoses to transgender saints to John/Eleanor Rykener’s late fourteenth-century sexual performance “as a woman.” What is distinctive about medieval trans narratives? How do they challenge contemporary models of gender and sexual identity? How does trans intersect with other categories, such as disability? What models—for example, “transgender time”—do we use to think about trans in the past? Participants are all asked to address, however briefly, an overarching question: what difference does it make to our reading of texts by Chaucer and those of his age to deploy transgender as a category of analysis?

Organizer: Ruth Evans (Saint Louis University)
Moderator: Ruth Evans
Room: Emmanuel College 119

  1. Leanne MacDonald (University of Notre Dame), “Challenging Normative Notions of Transidentity in Medieval Studies”
  2. Wan-Chuan Kao (Washington and Lee University), "Trans*domesticity"
  3. Michelle M. Sauer (University of North Dakota), "Reading the 'Glitch': Trans-, Technology, and Gender in Medieval Texts"
  4. M. W. Bychowski (Case Western Reserve University), "Transgender Ethics: The Wife of Bath's Trans Feminism"
  5. Miranda Hajduk, (Seton Hall University), "'My Sturdy Hardynesse': The Wife of Bath’s Antifeminist Satire as Trans Narrative"
  6. Cai Henderson (Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto), "Christine de Pizan's 'droite condicion': Authorial Construction and Resonant Reading in Transgender Text"

Session 3I: Literature and Late Medieval Science (Paper)
Organizer: NCS Program Committee
Moderator: Lisa Cooper (University of Wisconsin, Madison)
Room: Emmanuel College 108

  1. Matthew Boyd Goldie (Rider University), "Ground-Level Affordances: Astrolabes, Quadrants, and Practica Geometriae"
  2. David Hadbawnik (American University of Kuwait), "'Ignotum per ignocius': The Science of Unknowing in Late Medieval English Alchemical Poetry"
  3. Charlotte Rudman (King's College London), "The Science of Sound in Chaucer's Dream Vision Poetry"

Session 3J: The Meaning of Religious Violence (Paper)

Scholarship has become accustomed to addressing “symbolic violence”—according to Bourdieu, “that form of domination which... is only exerted through the communication in which it is disguised”—but of course medieval literature is replete with depictions of physical violence as well. This violence is also the subject of contested history; Steven Pinker, for instance, has recently argued, in a kind of evolutionary-psychology updating of Norbert Elias, that humankind is on a perpetual progression upward from greater to lesser violence. This session seeks papers on violence in Middle English literature: its representation, its significance, its relationship to symbolic power and domination, its relation to meaning-making and communication, or the competing ways in which it is interpreted, justified, or suppressed.

Organizer: Robert Epstein (Fairfield University)
Moderator: Robert Epstein
Room: Victoria College 211

  1. Shoshana Adler (University of Pennsylvania), "Categorical Violence: the Trope of Gog Magog and Racialized Formations in Middle English Alexander Literature"
  2. Daniel Kline (University of Alaska, Anchorage), "Pedagogical Violence, Levinasian Ethics, and the Subversive Physical Logic of the Alma Redemptoris in Chaucer’s Prioress’s Tale"
  3. Maia Farrar (University of Michigan), "Testing Treweth: Systems of Dissent in the Erle of Tolous"

10:30-11:00     Break

11:00-12:30 Race and Inclusion: Facing Chaucer Studies, Past and Future (Isabel Bader Theatre)

Moderator: Ruth Evans (Saint Louis University)

  1. Anthony Bale (Birkbeck, University of London)
  2. Candace Barrington (Central Connecticut State University)
  3. Carolyn Dinshaw (New York University)
  4. Wan-Chuan Kao (Washington and Lee University)
  5. Richard Sévère (Valparaiso University)

12:30-2:00    Lunch 

2:00-3:30      SESSIONS: GROUP 4

Session 4A: Medieval Latour (Paper)

Bruno Latour’s work has become prominent within scholarship on the Middle Ages, figuring in analyses of the present’s relation to the past, posthumanism, the history of science, ecocriticism, materiality, and semiotics. We ask prospective panelists to highlight a topic within Latour's corpus that has particular value for medieval studies and to propose a brief selection (about 15 pages) that the audience and fellow panelists might read in advance of the panel to aid discussion. Once selected, panelists will work together to decide on a final list of topics and readings. At the beginning of the seminar, panelists will introduce the readings in order to foment and focus conversation. As with all seminars, an hour will be left for discussion with the audience. We hope that the session will be engaging for those with little knowledge of Latour's work as well as those familiar with it. (*SWITCHED TO PAPER PANEL)

Thread: Forming Knowledge
Organizers: Michelle Karnes (University of Notre Dame); Julie Orlemanski (University of Chicago)
Moderator: Michelle Karnes
Room: Emmanuel College 119

  1. Laura Saetveit Miles (University of Bergen, Norway), "Latour's 'How Not to Misunderstand the Science and Religion Debate': A Useful Philosophy against False Binaries"
  2. Jessica Rezunyk (Upper Canada College), "Latour's Facing Gaia: Translations of Nature and Religion"
  3. Katherine Zieman (Harvard University), "Latour, Technology, and Mediation"

Session 4B: Gendered History, Historicized Gender I (Paper)

When the New Historicism was near its apogee, there was some controversy regarding its relation to feminism. As Wai-Chee Dimock wrote in American Literature in 1991, “If the feminist chronicling of women's oppression and celebration of women's difference have appeared misguided to many New Historicists, the New Historicist universalization of power and blurring of genders have struck many feminists as nothing short of reactionary.” As we reconsider the directions of historical analysis, it is appropriate to revisit questions of gender and history. This session seeks papers that offer innovative historicized analyses of gender, or that consider whether historically oriented critical approaches subsequent to New Historicism have addressed the quandary that Dimock identified.

Thread: History Now
Organizer: Elizabeth Robertson (University of Glasgow)
Moderator: Jennifer Jahner (California Institute of Technology)
Room: Victoria College 323

  1. Holly Crocker (University of South Carolina), "Feminism Without Gender: Chaucer’s Legend of Good Women and Late Medieval Literary Studies"
  2. Andrew Prescott (University of Glasgow), "Who Was Cecily Chaumpaigne?"
  3. Robert Epstein (Fairfield University), "'Wommen for to selle': Criseyde as Fictitious Commodity"

Session 4C: “The Marches”: The Cultural and Linguistic Positioning of Border Literature (Lightning)

Recent work on the multilingual border societies of medieval Britain has shown that frontier regions or “Marches” were often productive sites of encounter, language contact, and cultural exchange, particularly in the Marches of Wales and Scotland during England’s efforts to conquer those countries in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. This session weighs the utility of using “the March” as a governing principle for analyzing literature. It considers the tension between viewing a march as a site of cultural transmission and contact (i.e. a line to be crossed) versus a discrete zone in its own right. Participants might address language contact, cultural contact, or the effects of multilingualism in a border context, as well as the extent to which border regions can/should be viewed in relation to the cultural mainstream.

Thread: Language Contacts
Organizer: Helen Cushman (Harvard University)
Moderator: Helen Cushman
Room: Victoria College 215

  1. Helen Fulton (Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Bristol), "Literary Production on the March of Wales"
  2. David Callander (University of Cambridge), "Teilo Englished: the Middle English Life of St Teilo and the March"
  3. Simon Meecham-Jones, "Geoffrey Chaucer Regrets ... Gamelyn and the Welsh March"
  4. Joseph Taylor (University of Alabama, Huntsville), "A Coming Community: The Anglo-Scottish March in the Late Middle Ages"
  5. Andrew M. Richmond (SUNY Oneonta), "A Land Out of Time: The Role of Anglo-Scottish Border Landscapes in the Late-Medieval Romance Imaginary"

Session 4D: Is There a Text for This Class? Editing Chaucer Now I (Position)

This session seeks position papers on current editorial efforts to produce texts of Chaucer for the classroom and for critical reference, and it invites participants to think about why the texts of Chaucer’s writings do not attract anything like the vibrant variety of editorial and publishing support given to those of Shakespeare.

Thread: Making the Text
Organizer: Elizabeth Scala (University of Texas at Austin)
Moderator: Elizabeth Scala
Room: Victoria College Chapel

  1. David Lawton (Washington University in St. Louis), "The Norton Chaucer"
  2. Kathryn Lynch (Wellesley College), "Reader Friendly Chaucer Editions for an Age of Distraction"
  3. Peter Robinson & Barbara Bordalejo (University of Saskatchewan & University of Leuvan), "Many People Making Many Texts for Many Purposes"
  4. Andrew Taylor (University of Ottawa), "Should it be Rawer?: The Future of the Single Manuscript Edition"

Session 4E: Chivalric Ideology (Paper)
Organizer: NCS Program Committee
Moderator: Daniel Kline (University of Alaska, Anchorage)
Victoria College 101

  1. Marcel Elias (St Catharine's College, Cambridge), "Chaucer, the Crusades, and Chivalric Reform"
  2. Brian Gastle (Western Carolina University), "Chaucer the Veteran: Translating Violence in the Temple of Mars"
  3. Amy N. Vines (University of North Carolina at Greensboro), "Affect and the Chivalric Subject"

Session 4F: Monastic Prayer, Monastic Poetics (Paper)
Organizer: NCS Program Committee
Moderator: Barbara Zimbalist (University of Texas, El Paso)
Room: Victoria College 212

  1. Fiona Somerset (University of Connecticut), “Religious Poetics: A Fifteenth-Century ‘Reformation in Feeling’”
  2. Ann Killian (Yale University), "Lydgate’s Marian Macaronics"
  3. Amanda Joan Wetmore (Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto), "Measure for Measure: The Poetics of Violence in Lydgate's The Fifteen O's of Christ"

Session 4G: Politic Translations: English Languages, English Books (Paper)
Organizer: NCS Program Committee
Moderator: Heather Blatt (Florida International University)
Room: Emmanuel College 302

  1. Vickie Larsen (University of Michigan, Flint), "John Dryden’s Wife of Bath’s Tale"
  2. Rosemarie McGerr (Indiana University, Bloomington), "Latin in The Pilgrimage of the Soul: The Politics of Translation in Early Fifteenth-Century England"
  3. Sarah J. Sprouse (Texas Tech University), "Brut Lost? Brut Found: The Curious Case of The Historie of Cambria"

Session 4H: Wheels and Fire: Ideas of Language in Medieval Literature (Process and Technology) (Lightning)

From wicker houses to twittering birds to writing on the wall, Chaucer’s poetry is awash in images, metaphors, and representations of language both ciphered and overt. Indeed, The Canterbury Tales might be called a thought experiment in creating, transmitting and receiving stories, a work fundamentally about the potential and the limitations of speech and writing. This session is not a linguistics session (though grammar and linguistics may be discussed). Instead, it steps back from linguistics itself to consider how medieval writers understood language to work, how they described and represented it, and how such understandings were processed in their work. Topics could include metaphors used for language; images of reading, writing, and speaking in medieval works; explicit versus implicit concepts of language; noise, sound, and music as language.

Organizer: David K. Coley, Simon Fraser University
Moderator: David K. Coley
Room: Victoria College 115

  1. Spencer Strub (University of California, Berkeley), "Process"
  2. Jeffery G. Stoyanoff (Spring Hill College), "Gower’s 'Trojan Horse': Metaphor, Reading, and Networks"
  3. Jordan Zweck (University of Wisconsin, Madison), "Giving Voice to Medieval Sign Lexica"
  4. Kara L. McShane (Ursinus College), "Writing as Time-Traveling Technology"
  5. Jonathan Hsy (George Washington University), "Relay Languages and Visual Vernaculars: Reading Speech, Writing Gesture"

3:30-4:00    Coffee Break

4:00-5:30    SESSIONS: GROUP 5

Session 5A: Chaucer’s “Cavillaciouns” (Paper)

The Middle English Dictionary defines cavillacioun as “the practice of making trivial or insincere objections or presenting captious, evasive or spurious arguments; cavilling, quibbling, sophistry, fraud, or an instance of it.” This session invites consideration of specific instances of cavilling, quibbling, sophistry, or intellectual fraud in in Chaucer’s works, and/or of the ways in which such moments reflect fourteenth-century attitudes to the establishment of knowledge and the defining of truth in general. To what purpose(s), for example, does Chaucer depict literalistic or legalistic attitudes to contracts or codes? And to what extent does Chaucer’s depiction of cavillacioun(s) reflect real unease about over-cleverness and demonstrative intellectualism in general?

Thread: Forming Knowledge
Organizer: Neil Cartlidge (University of Durham)
Moderator: Neil Cartlidge
Room: Victoria College 115

  1. Theodore Chelis (Pennsylvania State University), "Fraudulent Auctoritates and Inept Sophistry in Chaucer's Legend of Cleopatra"
  2. Kathleen Burt (Middle Georgia State University), "Rhetorical Failure and Scientific Fraud in the Canon’s Yeoman’s Prologue and Tale"
  3. Helen Cooper (Magdalene College, Cambridge), "Logic and False Logic in Chaucer's Balade of 'Fortune'"

Session 5B: Is There a Text for This Class? Editing Chaucer Now II (Position)

This session seeks position papers on current editorial efforts to produce texts of Chaucer for the classroom and for critical reference, and it invites participants to think about why the texts of Chaucer’s writings do not attract anything like the vibrant variety of editorial and publishing support given to those of Shakespeare.

Thread: Making the Text
Organizer: Elizabeth Scala (University of Texas at Austin)
Moderator: Elizabeth Scala
Room: Victoria College Chapel

  1. Julia Boffey & Tony Edwards (Queen Mary University of London & University of Kent), "The Cambridge Chaucer"
  2. Christopher Cannon (Johns Hopkins University), "The Oxford Chaucer"
  3. Daniel Ransom (University of Oklahoma), "The Variorum Chaucer: Old Philology and Future Study of Chaucer"
  4. Elizabeth Scala, "Response: The Future of the Chaucer Book”

Session 5C: Doing Things with Latin (Paper)

As recent interventions by Joseph Farrell, Andrew Galloway, and Nicholas Watson (among others) have helped to make clear, the status of Latin in the later Middle Ages was far more vexed than earlier historiographies allow. Yet, if we can no longer simply consider the relationship between Latin and the vernacular in terms of familiar binaries (of gender, power, culture, etc.), how should we formulate a more rigorously historicized (or otherwise theorized) account of Latin in late-medieval England? This panel seeks papers that, in addressing this question, focus on specific Anglo-Latin authors (e.g., Grosseteste, Rolle, Gower), on Latinate literary trends and discourses (e.g., neoclassicism, scholastic exegesis, liturgical compositions), on works that mix Latin and the vernaculars, or on the place of Latin texts in specific plurilingual manuscripts. Relatedly, papers are also encouraged on the Latinity of Middle English studies in the last century (or more).

Organizer: Andrew Kraebel (Trinity University)
Moderator: Stephanie Batkie (University of the South)
Room: Victoria College 212

  1. Joe Stadolnik (University College London), "Henry Daniel’s Latinish"
  2. Matthew Day (University of Oxford), "Metrical Study and Classicizing Style in the Works of John Seward"
  3. Alex Mueller (University of Massachusetts, Boston), "Waking the Wordsmith: Ars dictaminis and Alliterative Verse"

Session 5D: Affective Spaces, Priavte to Public (Paper)

Although Chaucer’s works are often marked by a spirit of conviviality and community, there are many moments in his texts where Chaucer the narrator, the pilgrims, or the figures in his dream visions find themselves alone. For this session, we would like to see papers that parse what it means to be alone or lonely in Chaucer’s works. Considering many of us as medievalists work alone, thinking about solitude and loneliness in the works of a poet who is not frequently considered outside the frame of “Social Chaucer” can help to tie our modern identities as medievalists to moments where community in Chaucer breaks down or is simply nonexistent. Finally, this session offers space to think through how moments of loneliness or of solitude reflect Chaucer’s exploration of the nature of emotions, the foundations of sexualities and/or gender, and the dimensions of poetic making, as collaboration or solo activity.

Organizers: Will Rogers (University of Louisiana, Monroe); Christopher Roman (Kent State University)
Moderator: Christopher Roman
Room: Emmanuel College 119

  1. Betsy McCormick (Mount San Antonio College), “Old, Unhappy, Far-Off Things: Solitude, Loneliness and Memory in Chaucer's Legend of Good Women
  2. Gina Hurley (Yale University), “‘Schryue yow openlye’: Innocence, Guilt, and the Space of Confession in Le Bone Florence de Rome"
  3. ​Helen Hickey (University of Melbourne), “Affective Cartography and Aesthetics — London in Medieval Writing”

Session 5E: Misogynies: Medieval and Modern (Lightning)

As the recent American election campaign attests, misogyny—with its capacity to characterize powerful women as shrews and bitches and thereby undermine their political legitimacy—remains a significant political force. In media and popular culture, characterizations of women as jealous, lying, sex-hungry sluts abound. Scholars of the Middle Ages know that these notions have a long history in the West. This session invites short papers that explore the connections between modern and medieval misogynies and that consider how medieval feminist scholarship can contribute to an understanding of misogyny and its power in the twenty-first century.​

Organizer: Nicole Nolan Sidhu (East Carolina University)
Moderator: Nicole Nolan Sidhu
Room: Victoria College 323

  1. Carissa M. Harris (Temple University), "'A drunken cunt hath no porter': Women, Alcohol, and Misogyny from the Medieval Alehouse to the Modern College Campus"
  2. Angela Jane Weisl (Seton Hall University), "'Trusteth as in love no man but me': Mansplaining and Feminist Resistance"
  3. Karen A. Winstead (The Ohio State University), "Misogyny, 'faux feminism,' and the (Ab)Uses of the Past"
  4. Sheila Fisher (Trinity College), "Griselda’s Two Faces, or When Hillary Met Melania"
  5. Sara Fredman (Washington University in St. Louis), "'Ye archewyves, stondeth at defense': The Clerk’s Tale, Breaking Bad, and Women Who Persist"
  6. Christine Di Gangi (Dawson Community College, Montana University System), "Symbolized Femininity and the State at War: Fifteenth-Century Misogyny and Contemporary Analogues"

Session 5F: Negative Thinking in Middle English Romance (Paper)
Organizer: NCS Program Committee
Moderator: Amy N. Vines (University of North Carolina, Greensboro)
Room: Victoria College 101

  1. Paul A. Broyles (North Carolina State University), "Fictions of Possession: Exchanging the Immaterial in Amadace, Cleges, and Gawain"
  2. Paul Gaffney (Hiram College), "Bodily Violations as Broken Signifiers in Medieval English Romance"
  3. Grace Timperley (University of Manchester), "Unknowing in the Middle English Lybeaus Desconus"

Session 5G: Parliament, Institutions, Theory: New Cases for Literature and the Law (Paper)

Late medieval literature intertwines with institutions. Pursuing the commitments of literary texts often leads to parliament, chancery, or exchequer and to their attendant political and legal processes. Historicist approaches have richly sustained study of these intersections. This panel, however, seeks contributions that engage with legal and institutional history, but offer emergent perspectives through theoretical approaches often unpaired with historicist work. For example, what does psychoanalysis as speech theory teach us about political debate? How might ecocriticism attend to the spaces in which the law was practiced? Where’s affect in constitutional history? Participants will deliver brief talks that showcase the contributions that theoretical approaches to the law can make to the study of legal and political institutions or to documentary culture in late medieval England.

Organizers: Brantley Bryant (Sonoma State University); Jonathan Forbes (University of California, Santa Barbara)
Moderator: Jonathan Forbes
Room: Emmanuel College 302

  1. Julie Chamberlin (Indiana University, Bloomington), "Posthuman Theory, Prehumanist Tradition: Legal Networks in the Middle Ages"
  2. Anya Adair (University of Hong Kong), "Law in the Hands of the Scribes: Book-making, Legal Temporality and the Forest Charter in the Fourteenth Century"
  3. Craig E. Bertolet (Auburn University), "Habitus and the City: Reading London’s Civic Documents through the Lens of Bourdieu"

Session 5H: Scientia, Sapientia, Pedagogia (Paper)

From Aristotle through Augustine and Aquinas, scientia (head knowledge) and sapientia (heart knowledge) have been understood as important, and often mutually exclusive, modalities of knowledge. This session invites lightning talks that explore the intersection of the two, particularly as they emerge in pedagogical theory and practice extending from the Middle Ages to the present day. How do writers of lyrics on the Passion provide their audiences with concrete information even as they prioritize affect and a wisdom of the heart? How do prose confessional manuals appeal both to individual devotion and communal ways of knowing (literally, con-science) as part of their teaching strategies? And what might be the best strategies for engaging with emotional and intellectual responses to medieval literature, on the part of both our students and ourselves? By addressing such questions, this session highlights the multiple literacies and ways of knowing drawn upon by medieval and modern writers, readers, and educators.

Organizers: Nicole D. Smith (University of North Texas); Moira Fitzgibbons (Marist College)
Moderator: Nicole D. Smith
Victoria College 215

  1. Jennifer Sisk (University of Vermont), "Clergie, Kynde Knowyng, and the Teaching of Piers Plowman"
  2. Jessica Hines (Duke University), "Knowing Suffering: Pity and the Gentle Heart in Late Medieval Literature"
  3. Kathryn Vulić (Western Washington University), "Scientia and Sapientia in 'The Thrush and The Nightingale'"

5:30-6:30    Transition time

6:30-8:00    Reception at Art Gallery of Ontario, co-hosted by Medievalists of Color

Schedule: 11 July

PDF OF FULL PROGRAM

9:00                  Registration opens (Foyer, Victoria College “Old Vic”)

10:00-10:30      Welcome + First Nations Smudging Ceremony (Isabel Bader Theatre)

10:30-11:00      Readings by Professor Emeritus Carter Revard, Washington University in St Louis (Isabel Bader Theatre)
                         Introduction: Susanna Fein, Kent State University

11:00-12:00      Presidential Lecture: Ardis Butterfield, Yale University (Isabel Bader Theatre), “The Dream of Language”

12:00-1:30        Lunch

1:30-3:00    SESSIONS: GROUP 1

Session 1A: Chaucer Abroad: Who Owns Chaucer Now? (Position)

While Chaucer’s enduring position at the center of Middle English studies is increasingly interrogated within Anglophone literary studies, this session focuses on Chaucer’s cultural and geopolitical functions across the globe. Who owns the medieval past, and whose past is medieval? Should Chaucerians dispersed across the world participate in political debates regarding English, British, or European identity (past or present)? How do reception histories and artistic appropriations of the medieval past worldwide reframe understandings of race, home, and cultural belonging? What duties do we have to far-flung international audiences in our acts of scholarship, teaching, editing, or publishing?

Thread: Chaucer Abroad
Organizers: Louise D’Arcens (Macquarie University); Jonathan Hsy (George Washington University)
Moderator: Louise D’Arcens
Room: Emmanuel College 119

  1. Elizabeth Watkins (Loyola University New Orleans), "The Canterbury Tales in Translation in the Philippines”
  2. Ufuoma Overo-Tarimo (University of Iceland), “Chaucer Makes Sense in Africa”
  3. Kathy Forni (Loyola University Maryland), “Marketing Chaucer: The Power of the Image”

Session 1B: The Value of Truth (Position)

What is the value of truth? This session asks each participant to take a stance on how truth matters, either to histories of medieval knowledge or for us today. Of course, what “truth” means is not straightforward. Middle English treuth variously denoted fidelity, righteousness, doctrine, and correspondence to reality. In historical grands récits, the Middle Ages appear both slavishly beholden to theological truths and blind to the rational truths of the Enlightenment. Today, we’re sometimes said to live in a “post-truth” society, whether because politicians lie with impunity or because the contextual conditions of truth-claims are widely acknowledged. Moreover, the past two decades of Middle English studies have criticized and proposed alternatives to the positivism that once determined the truths of our field. Has “truth” changed for us? Participants are invited to stake a position as to what the worth of “truth” might be.

Thread: Forming Knowledge
Organizer: Julie Orlemanski (University of Chicago)
Moderator: Julie Orlemanski
Room: Victoria College 101

  1. Jessica Henderson (University of Toronto), “Truth-Claims in Middle English Medical Writing and the Crisis of Reproducibility”
  2. Karl Steel (Brooklyn College and The Graduate Center, CUNY), "Skepticism: On ‘Miscreaunce’ in Ovidian Metempsychosis"
  3. Lee Read (Wilde Lake High School), “The Wordes Moote be Cosyn to the Dede”
  4. Miriamne Ara Krummel (University of Dayton), “The Truth is There Some Where: 1255, Belaset, and Hugh of Lincoln”

Session 1C: Let Us Talk Then, You and I: The Future with History (Position)

This session seeks to discuss what literary scholars and historians have learned from one another about Chaucer and late medieval culture and society, and whether our conversation is evolving or faltering and being superseded. Does occupying the interstitial spaces between literature and history result in a sharper or richer image, or have the two disciplines been talking at cross purposes? Is now the best moment to evaluate what we have learned from talking together, and will the outcome suggest that it is worthwhile to continue the dialogue between historians and literary scholars? Or are we instead facing a period of retreat, isolation, new alliances?

Thread: History Now
Organizers: Clementine Oliver (California State University, Northridge); Elliot Kendall (University of Exeter); Sebastian Sobecki (University of Groningen)
Moderator: Paul Strohm (Columbia University)
Room: Victoria College Chapel

  1. Martha Carlin (University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee), “John Gower: Loan Shark, Proud Husband, and Friend of Richard II's Murderer? (The Importance of Interdisciplinary Dialogue)”
  2. Bruce Holsinger (University of Virginia), “The Forms of Literary History”
  3. Steve Rigby (University of Manchester), “Chaucer and Ideology”
  4. Lynn Staley (Colgate University), “Chaucer’s History”

Session 1D: What Happened to Old English after the Tremulous Hand? (Position)

After 1200, Old English ceased being widely copied. The Tremulous Hand of Worcester is the latest figure known to have studied the language closely until the mid sixteenth century. What happened in between? Did readers and writers of insular French, Middle English, or Anglo-Latin care about and talk about Old English? If so, why did they care and how did they express their interest? Were early modern Anglo-Saxonists aware of having predecessors? This panel calls for short position papers exploring answers to these question using as many kinds of evidence as possible: manuscript glosses, chronicles, legal texts, writings on language and translation, and more.                

Thread: Language Contacts
Organizers: Nicholas Watson (Harvard University); Elaine Treharne (Stanford University)
Moderator: Nicholas Watson
Room: Victoria College 212

  1. Kathryn A. Lowe (University of Glasgow), “Using Old English after the Conquest: Charter Texts”
  2. Ian Cornelius (Loyola University, Chicago), “Middle English Verse before 1066”
  3. Wendy Scase (University of Birmingham), “Late Medieval Scribes' Old English”
  4. Scott Bevill (University of Tennessee), “Copies All the Way Down: The Parkerian Transcriptions of Bede's Death Song in CCCC 100”
  5. Elaine Treharne (Stanford University), Response

Session 1E: Loving and Hating Chaucer in the 21st Century (Position)

Acknowledging exciting engagements with proliferating adaptations of Chaucer worldwide, this session looks inward, seeking interrogations of and challenges to Chaucer’s place at the center of the Middle English (and perhaps late-medieval) canon.  As we explore ways in which Chaucer authorizes Middle English studies, is it time—or too late—to ask (again) about de-centering the canon? Should we keep on loving Chaucer as the preeminent textual maker, or hate him for overshadowing the diversity and range of Middle English (medieval?) textuality? Papers, manifestos, essays, polemics, or persuasions welcome, as we assess the benefits and/or liabilities of keeping Chaucer and his legacy as the authorial, textual, canonical, or aesthetic center of the field.

Thread: Making the Text
Organizer: Patricia Clare Ingham (Indiana University, Bloomington)
Moderator: Patricia Clare Ingham 
Room: Victoria College 323

  1. R. D. Perry (New Chaucer Society Postdoctoral Fellow), “Done with the Canterbury Tales
  2. Katie Little (University of Colorado, Boulder), “Chaucer and the Crisis of the Humanities”
  3. Marion Turner (University of Oxford), “Rethinking Biography”
  4. Sierra Lomuto (University of Pennsylvania), “Thinking With and Beyond Chaucer: Adaptations for the Inclusive Classroom”
  5. Robert J. Meyer-Lee (Agnes Scott College), “Loving and Hating Canonicity”

Session 1F: Chaucer and Rape: New Directions (Lightning)

This session seeks papers focusing on representations of sexual violence in Chaucer’s poetry. Chaucer’s literary engagement with rape is both persistent and nuanced, further complicated by his involvement in Cecily Chaumpaigne’s 1380 raptus case, and this session will feature papers that examine that engagement in innovative ways. Speakers can contextualize Chaucer’s treatment of rape within medieval legal or historical discourses; they can examine his work in conversation with other works about sexual violence, like pastourelles; or they can discuss productive ways of teaching Chaucer’s rape texts in the college classroom. This session particularly welcomes new work linking sexual violence in Chaucerian texts to contemporary issues like campus sexual violence, alcohol-facilitated sexual assault, and anti-rape education efforts.

Organizer: Carissa M. Harris (Temple University)
Moderator: Carissa M. Harris
Room: Victoria College 215

  1. Rachel E. Moss (University of Oxford), “From John and Aleyn’s Jape to Brock Turner’s Text: The Homosocial Gaze and Rape”
  2. Nicole Nyffenegger (University of Bern), “Relating (to) the Pain: From Chaucer to Stanford and Back”
  3. Alison Gulley (Appalachian State University), “Rape Erasure in Chaucer’s Writing: The Cases of Cecilia and Custance”
  4. Nicole Nolan Sidhu (East Carolina University), “Sexual Assault and Religious Difference in the Man of Law's Tale
  5. Sarah Baechle (University of Mississippi), “‘Oure corn is stoln’: Pastoral Discourse and Chaucer’s Rape Narratives”
  6. Jessica Rosenfeld (Washington University in St. Louis), “Chaucer and Consent in the Classroom”

Session 1G: Does Formalism Need Poetry? (Paper)

The inception of formalist methods in literary studies ("practical criticism" and "new criticism") in the early twentieth century made lyric poetry a privileged object of analysis. Yet Caroline Levine's influential Forms: Whole, Rhythm, Hierarchy, Network (2015) not only proposes a new set of terms of art for formalism but also asserts the primacy of novels in formalist studies, even as other disciplines take formal approaches to a variety of media. What kinds of "affordances," to use Levine's term, do medieval forms offer to new formalisms? Within this critical landscape, should formalism still take poetry as a primary object of study? This panel invites position papers that take up the question in its title by engaging with medieval texts, art, disciplinary history, manuscript studies, or any other topics pertaining to formalism.

Organizer: Ingrid Nelson (Amherst College)
Moderator: Ingrid Nelson
Room: Victoria College 115

  1. Valerie Allen (John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY), “The Embarrassments of Rhyme”
  2. Katharine Jager (University of Houston, Downtown), “The Affordance of Memory: ‘The Rebel Letters’ of 1381, Formalism and the Function of the Lyric”
  3. Kara Gaston (University of Toronto), “Forms of Constellation”

Session 1H: Dreams and the Scientific Imagination (Paper)

This session invites papers that engage with current approaches to Chaucer's use of science in his dream vision corpus, examining how Chaucer’s knowledge of physics, metaphysics and the study of natural phenomena contributes to his literary works. The connections between science, technology and the imagination in medieval literary culture have long been of interest in Chaucer studies, and attention to these topics has only intensified in recent years. Papers will investigate the ways in which Chaucer’s scientific learning is imaginatively presented in his fiction. How does Chaucer draw upon Aquinas’s Commentary on the Metaphysics of Aristotle creatively in his dream vision poetry, for example? How does he apply or even recreate Aristotelian science?

Organizer: Charlotte Rudman (King’s College London)
Moderator: Charlotte Rudman
Room: Emmanuel College 302                 

  1. Micah Goodrich (University of Connecticut), “‘Or as craft countrefeteth kinde’: Technologies of Counterfeit in the House of Fame
  2. Megan Leitch (Cardiff University), “Chaucer’s Dream Visions and the Science of Sleep”
  3. Boyda Johnstone (Fordham University), “The Nature of Healing in Chaucerian Dream Poetry”

Session 1I: The Meaning of Chivalric Violence (Paper)

Scholarship has become accustomed to addressing “symbolic violence”—according to Bourdieu, “that form of domination which... is only exerted through the communication in which it is disguised”—but of course medieval literature is replete with depictions of physical violence as well. This violence is also the subject of contested history; Steven Pinker, for instance, has recently argued, in a kind of evolutionary-psychology updating of Norbert Elias, that humankind is on a perpetual progression upward from greater to lesser violence. This session seeks papers on violence in Middle English literature: its representation, its significance, its relationship to symbolic power and domination, its relation to meaning-making and communication, or the competing ways in which it is interpreted, justified, or suppressed.

Organizer: Robert Epstein (Fairfield University)
Moderator: Robert Epstein
Room: Northrop Frye 113

  1. Nicholas  Perkins (St. Hugh’s College, University of Oxford), “Communicating Violence, or, The Silence of the Limbs”
  2. Alyssa Coltrain (Rutgers University), “‘Weppons wyghtly weld’:  Violence and the Limits of Hagiography in Sir Gowther
  3. Ashby Kinch (University of Montana), “Practicing Violence: The Manciple’s Prologue and the Luttrell Psalter”

3:00-3:30    Coffee break

3:30-5:00    SESSIONS: GROUP 2

Session 2A: Chaucer “And”: Methods of Interdisciplinary (Paper)

As medievalists continue to direct their attention outward, toward different times, places, disciplines, cultures, and languages, their approaches are increasingly interdisciplinary. Studies of post-medieval Chaucer, of Chaucer inside and outside of Europe, of Chaucer and various branches of medieval science, among others, have become familiar to us, but invite further investigation. Is there what might be called a “method of interdisciplinarity,” which unites such approaches? Do these various approaches have ultimately similar aims? What assumptions underlie them, and what draws scholars to them? Unlike other sessions interested in the content of specific forms of interdisciplinary scholarship, this one is focused on its methods: how do we practice interdisciplinarity in Chaucer studies, and why do we employ the methods we employ? What are the most promising tactics and approaches for new research?

Thread: Forming Knowledge
Organizer: Michelle Karnes (University of Notre Dame)
Moderator: Michelle Karnes  
Room: Victoria College 115

  1. Ingrid Nelson (Amherst College), “Thinking (with) Media”
  2. Shazia Jagot (University of Surrey), “Chaucer and Arabic”
  3. Candace Barrington (Central Connecticut State University), “To Interdisciplinarity and Beyond”

Session 2B:  Do We Need Periodization? (Position)

Medieval studies has not been entirely well-served by traditional periodization, since the med/Ren divide produces a kind of opposition: religious, communal, boring vs. secular, individual, new. And so in the last 20–30 years medievalists have attempted to break down (or through) this divide. In response to such volumes as Brian Cummings and James Simpson’s (eds.) Cultural Reformations, it is now worth asking whether what is gained by this revision is greater than what is lost. This session seeks position papers on the topic of periodization that address questions such as: Does one need an idea of the Middle Ages in order to teach and study it? What would replace traditional periodization were we to dispense with it? Does periodization prioritize certain kinds of historical change, and, if so, what are they and why? Is the term used in recent English histories of drama—Tudor—more or less helpful?

Thread: History Now                 
Organizer: Katie Little (University of Colorado, Boulder)   
Moderator: Katie Little
Room: Victoria College Chapel

  1. Laura Ashe (University of Oxford), “Not Period but Process”
  2. Kathy Lavezzo (University of Iowa), “Bad Medievalism”
  3. Theresa Coletti (University of Maryland, College Park), “Periodization, Temporalities, Medieval Drama”
  4. Mike Rodman Jones (University of Nottingham), “New Directions in Med-Ren Studies”
  5. David Matthews (University of Manchester), “Now what?”

Session 2C: Translating the Non-Human (Seminar)

This seminar invites participants to consider the connections created by translations of the nonhuman into human languages. To what extent is language the domain of the human, and the human defined by language? And how does thinking about nonhumans destabilize these questions? Participants might share work on how nature is translated onto the page, the ways that ideas of humanness are connected to non- or plurilingualism, translations of the nonhuman across genre, and how translation as a contact zone between the human and the nonhuman might encourage exchange and neighborliness between the two.         

Thread: Language
Organizers: Liam Lewis (University of Warwick); Haylie Swenson (The George Washington University)
Moderators: Haylie Swenson 
Room: Victoria College 215

  1. Susan Crane (Columbia University), “Charming: How to Talk to Things”
  2. Lara Farina (West Virginia University), “‘Simples’ and the Foliation of Language”
  3. Megan E. Palmer (Independent Scholar), “Translating Tracks of Exile: Avian Eloquence in Seafarer and Wanderer
  4. Arthur Russell (Case Western Reserve University), “Field Studies in Mimesis”
  5. Rob Wakeman (Mount Saint Mary College), “The Simplicity of the Ass”
  6. Andrea Whitacre (Indiana University), “How to Re-Translate a Werewolf”
  7. Tom White (University of Oxford), “Written in Trees”

Session 2D: In the Eye of the Beholder? Perfecting and Completing MSS and Early Printed Books (Paper)

This session explores medieval manuscripts and/or early printed books in a state of mobility, moving from loss to “perfection.” Examples might include manuscripts with pages that are not original or where illuminations have been inserted or restored, as is the case in Cambridge Gg.4.27, which includes Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, and in Morgan M. 126, Gower’s Confessio Amantis, among others; chronicles and guildhall records that are “perfected” over time with pages added to fill out the history or record long after the original scribes or writers are gone; or early printed books filled out with facsimile pages or with leaves from other editions by the same printer (frequent in Caxton editions). Discussion of perfected copies will open to a larger consideration of what precisely constitutes a book, along with questions of making and reception.

Thread: Making the Text                 
Organizer: Martha Driver (Pace University)
Moderator: Martha Driver 
Room: Victoria College 212

  1. Hope Johnston (Baylor University), “Perfecting Imperfect Early Printed Chaucers”
  2. Siân Echard (University of British Columbia), “‘Imperfect and Valueless’: Early Modern Transcriptions, Modern Scholars”
  3. Devani Singh (University of Geneva), “Tampering or Perfection?: Renaissance Additions to Chaucer's Early Books”

Session 2E: Allegorical Scale (Paper)

Allegory is, in a very basic sense, a device for manipulating scale. At the beginning of Boethius’  Consolation of Philosophy, Lady Philosophy literally changes scale, at some times “keep[ing] herself within common mortal limits” while at others “seem[ing] to strike at the heavens with the crown of her head” and even “pierc[ing] heaven itself.” In doing so, she figures the way in which allegorical reading and composition link interpersonal interactions, human emotions and, in many cases, closely observed mimetic detail to broader moral, political, and philosophical problems. This panel welcomes discussions of the relationship between allegory and scale ranging from close readings of particular figures to broader considerations of the workings of allegorical scale as such. To what extent is it useful to think about allegory as a characteristically medieval technology for adjusting the scale at which we read and think?      

Thread: Middle English Literature at Scale   
Organizers: Katharine Breen (Northwestern University); Carolynn Van Dyke (Lafayette College)
Moderator: Carolynn Van Dyke 
Room: Emmanuel College 302

  1. Danielle Allor (Rutgers University), “Allegorical Instability in Piers Plowman’s Tree of Charity”
  2. Megan Cook (Colby College) “Very Small Forms: Heraldry, Allegory, and Scale”
  3. Seth Strickland (Cornell University) “Peace at Peace: Scales of Redemption in Piers Plowman

Session 2F: Affect Matters: Historicizing Feeling in the Age of Chaucer I (Paper) 

In this session we seek to historicize medieval affect. Papers might consider the following questions:  Is there a specifically Chaucerian affect that develops through Chaucer’s particular engagements with the genres of dream vision and fin amor, or through the “impersonated artistry” of The Canterbury Tales, or in the later construction of “Father Chaucer” by English and Scottish poets following him? What are the relationships between form and affect in Chaucer’s poetry and in that of his contemporaries? To what extent are objects and material contexts crucial for affective interaction in late medieval poetry? What are the mutually constitutive relationships between gender and affect in late medieval poetry? How does affect matter in the construction of religious identity; can we speak of a specifically Jewish or Muslim affect?           

Organizers: Glenn Burger (Queen’s College and The Graduate Center, CUNY); Holly Crocker (University of South Carolina)
Moderator: Holly Crocker 
Room: Victoria College 323

  1. Siobhain Bly Calkin (Carleton University), “Affect and the Construction of Religious Identity: Tales of Christians, Saracens, and Cross Relics in the Age of Chaucer”
  2. Stephanie Trigg (University of Melbourne), “Emotional Practices: Chaucer, Veronica and the History of Emotions”
  3. John Fry (University of Texas at Austin), “Hagiography’s ‘Structure of Feeling,’ the Legend of Good Women, and the Limits of Martyrdom”

Session 2G: In the Beginning, She Was: Feminizing Chaucer's Authority (Paper)

The complex lineage of Chaucer’s works has been subject to much scholarly scrutiny, with the acknowledged sources of Chaucer’s works and manuscripts gesturing towards a variety of male auctoritates. However, a recent special issue of The Chaucer Review, focusing on women’s relation to the literary canon, suggests that reconsideration of the influence of female-coded modes of knowledge, whether intellectual, spiritual or scientific, is now timely and urgent. We therefore invite short papers engaging with innovative, more capacious ways of accounting for the formation of the English canon at the time of Chaucer—papers that acknowledge female-coded epistemologies and the much neglected contribution of women’s piety and literacy to Chaucer’s intellectual landscape and that thereby open up our understanding of processes of canon formation beyond traditional patrilineal lines of transmission.

Organizers: Liz Herbert McAvoy (Swansea University); Roberta Magnani (Swansea University)
Moderator: Roberta Magnani 
Room: Emmanuel College 119

  1. Dorothy Kim (Vassar College), “‘Alt-Feminism,’ the Prioress, and Female-Coded Epistemologies of Antisemitism
  2. Samantha Katz Seal (University of New Hampshire), “Disowning Philippa: The Poetic Posterity of Chaucer's Wife”
  3. Diane Watt (University of Surrey), “The Paston Women and Chaucer: Canon Formation in the 15th Century”

Session 2H: Innovations in Access: Using New Media Tools to Teach Medieval Texts (Paper)
Organizers: Kara Crawford (The Bishop’s School); John Hoarty (Saint Ignatius College Prep)
Moderator: John Hoarty 
Room: Northrop Frye 113

  1. Moira Fitzgibbons (Marist College), “Close Reading in the Age of Screens: Teaching the Canterbury Tales alongside Graphic Narratives”
  2. Gina Armstrong (Birmingham-Southern College), Teresa P. Reed (Jacksonville State University), “The Place Where You Live: Digital Humanities as Accessible Pedagogy”
  3. Kenna L. Olsen (Mount Royal University), “Emerging Medievalisms: Tweets, Pods, Popular, and Popularized - New Medieval Media”

Session 2I: The Ars Moriendi and Practices of Care (Lightning)

This session aims to think of death as something other than a contest of power, a limit of meaning, a zone in which sovereignty plays out, or a dispersal of the self within absolute expenditure. It aims to circumvent thinking about death that has dominated work inspired by Hegel, Bataille, and biopolitics, and to avoid work that presents death as a grim struggle of the self against an indifferent world. This session therefore invites papers that consider medieval death practices in terms of community, hospice, and the management of shared vulnerability. It hopes to collect papers that are both "traditionally" archival and speculatively philosophical.                           

Organizers: Karl Steel (Brooklyn College, CUNY); Ashby Kinch (University of Montana)
Moderator: Ashby Kinch 
Room: Northrop Frye 119

  1. Justin Brent (Presbyterian College), “Ars Moriendi and Palliative Community”
  2. Ellis Light (Fordham University), “Deathbed Biopolitics: Power, Care, and Otherworldly Visions in Julian of Norwich
  3. Andrew Kraebel (Trinity University), “Auctoritas Moriendi”
  4. Rebecca F. McNamara (Westmont College), “Impending Death, Experience, and Authority in Chaucer”
  5. Devin Byker (College of Charleston), “Appearing, Revealing, Glimmering: Erasmus’s Vivid Deathbed”
  6. Bridget Whearty (Binghamton University, SUNY), “Death, Care, and Prayer in the Fifteenth Century”

Session 2J: Vexed Inheritances: Chaucer and Boccaccio (Paper)                     
Organizer: The NCS Program Committee     
Moderator: Richard G. Newhauser (Arizona State University, Tempe)
Room: Victoria College 101

  1. Jennifer Alberghini (The Graduate Center, CUNY), “Criseyde’s Calculations: Performing Filial Obedience in Il Filostrato and Troilus and Criseyde
  2. Frederick M. Biggs (University of Connecticut), “Boccaccio’s Place in the Marriage Group”
  3. Warren Ginsberg (University of Oregon), “Frames of Mind: The Decameron and the Canterbury Tales

5:15-6:00    Members Parliament

6:00-8:00    Research Expo with Reception at Hart House (Isabel Bader Theatre)

Organizers: Rebecca F. McNamara (Westmont College); Matthew Fisher (University of California, Los Angeles)

  • Anthony Bale (Birkbeck, University of London), “St Barbara's Tower”
  • Thomas Blake (Austin College), “‘Semyrame the secounde’: Pantsuits, Power, and the 2016 Presidential Election
  • Matthew Clancy (Birkbeck, University of London), “Recreating Lost Material Cultures: the Tomb of Arthur at Glastonbury Abbey”
  • Emilie Cox (Indiana University, Bloomington), “Medieval and Modern ‘Cucks’: Parsing the Misogyny of Chaucer’s Fabliaux and Alt-Right Politics”
  • Hideshi Ohno (Hiroshima University), “Variation among Manuscripts and Editions of the Canterbury Tales: With Special Reference to the Use of Personal and Impersonal Constructions”
  • Emerson Richards (Indiana University, Bloomington), “New Research on John Rylands Research Institute MS Latin 19 (an Illustrated Apocalypse)”
  • Sarah Wilma Watson (University of Pennsylvania), “‘Mon seul desir’: French Mottos in Fifteenth-Century England”
  • Susan Yager (Iowa State University), “DIY Digital Humanities: Basic Tools for Lexical Study”

8:30    LGBTQIA+ Get Together at the Glad Day Bookshop

Events Overview

Smudging

10:00am, Wednesday, July 11, Isabel Bader Theatre

We will be opening the conference with a smudging, which is a purification ceremony performed by many of the nations that make up the Indigenous peoples of Canada. A smudging will remove negative energy and cleanse a space, or an endeavour. In a smudging ceremony, an Elder (someone who has been recognized as a custodian of knowledge) will light dried plant medicines (sage and sweetgrass among others) until they are smoking. The smoke will then be spread with a feather around all gathered. Those being smudged pull the smoke towards them and breathe in. After a smudging, the Elder will often offer a prayer, and the ashes will be returned to the earth. It is important to note that smudging practices vary across Turtle Island; in the prairies it is customary to remove your jewelry and glasses during a smudge as they interfere with the cleansing process.

Our special thanks for his welcome and for performing the smudging ceremony to Elder-in-Residence Grafton Antone, First Nations House, who was born and raised in Oneida of the Thames First Nations, and is of the Wolf Clan. Yawʌ’ko, Grafton.

Carter Revard

10:30am, Wednesday, July 11, Isabel Bader Theatre

The smudging will be followed by a discussion of what it means to be guests on the sacred land on which the university operates: the territory of the Huron-Wendat and Petun First Nations, the Seneca, and most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit River; and a meeting place for many Indigenous people from across Turtle Island. The ceremony will be followed by readings by Native American and Chaucer scholar Carter Revard of his own, modern Indigenous, and Middle English poetry. Revard, who grew up on the Osage Reservation in Oklahoma, is well-known for his political poetry and his scholarship. Born in 1931, Revard won a radio quiz scholarship to attend the University of Tulsa, and continued on to become one of the first Native American Rhodes Scholars at Oxford before completing his PhD at Yale. He taught at Amherst College before beginning his prolific career as a poet and medievalist at Washington University in St. Louis.

Hart House Reception & Research Expo

6:00pm, Wednesday, July 11, Hart House Great Hall

There will be an informal reception at University of Toronto’s Hart House on Wednesday, July 11. Hart House is one of the earliest student centres in North America, and was established in 1919. The reception will take place in the Great Hall, which is immediately to the right of the entryway. Guests will be alloted one complimentary drink ticket, and then are invited to partake in catered appetizers and a cash bar. Entertainment will be provided by Pneuma Ensemble, a Toronto-based early music group focused on 11th-14th c. medieval monophony (such as troubador song and minnesang) using historically informed performance and medieval instruments. This reception serves as the formal opening of the Research Expo, with all poster presenters avilable to talk about their presentations.

LGBTQIA+ Get Together

8:30pm, Wednesday, July 11, Glad Day Bookshop

After the Wednesday night reception, all LGBTQIA+ and allies are welcome to join for drinks and mingling at Glad Day Bookshop. Glad Day is located on Church street in the heart of Church-Wellesley Village, long recognized as the heart of the LGBTQIA+ community in Toronto. Glad Day is an independent book store that specializes in LGBTQIA+ literature and is the oldest surviving bookstore in North America specializing in queer literature. Originally opened in 1970 by Jay Moldenhauer, Glad Day has come under new management and now offers food and drinks in addition to hosting events, readings, and other cultural events for Toronto’s LGBTQIA+ community. Please see here for the Facebook event.

Medievalists of Color AGO Reception & Ethiopian MSS Exhibit

6:30pm, Thursday, July 12, Art Gallery of Ontario

Reflecting NCS 2018’s commitment to investigating questions of race in the field of medieval studies and beyond it, we warmly invite all conference attendees to a reception at the Art Gallery of Ontario, co-hosted by the New Chaucer Society and the Medievalists of Color (MOC). The theme of this reception is “From Allies to Accomplices.” Please join NCS and MOC in a convivial space for conversation about the experiences of people of color in medieval studies, the goal of consistent and meaningful inclusivity in the field, and the ways that medievalists of color are changing the archival, methodological, and theoretical landscape of the profession.

Congress registrants are encouraged to visit the galleries of the AGO during the reception to see works by members of the famous Group of Seven as well as the Thomson Collection of European Art, which includes a magnificent collection of medieval ivories and boxwood prayer beads. Conference registrants are also invited to visit a display of Ethiopian manuscripts on Friday afternoon. NCS will offer a brochure containing short interpretive texts by medievalists of color responding to these artifacts and offering questions and thoughts to provoke further conversation.

The Miller’s Tale: Wahala Dey O! (play performance)

7:00pm, Friday, July 13, Isabel Bader Theatre; 5:00pm, Sunday, July 15, Theatre Erindale

The Miller’s Tale: Wahala Dey O! is a Nigerian play adaptation of Geoffrey Chaucer’s Miller’s Tale, written and directed by Ufuoma Overo-Tarimo.

The Miller’s Tale: Wahala Dey O! brings to life Chaucer’s medieval pilgrimage transposed to a prayer retreat in Lagos, Nigeria, where a drunken miller tells of the wahala (trouble) of a wealthy Urhobo carpenter tricked by his teenage wife and her lovers. The play weaves Chaucerian satire together with song, dance, and social commentary of modern Nigeria, asking bold questions about the wahala that unites us all--the fragile human emotions of fear, love, revenge, and our incessant need for gossip.

The play premiered in 2012 at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival to critical acclaim, and is being staged July 13 and 15, 2018 as a joint production between the University of Toronto and Saga Tiata, performed by members of the original cast alongside actors from the Nigerian and African diasporic community in Toronto. Undergraduates from the Department of English and Drama at the University of Toronto-Mississauga are putting together a critical edition of the play, led by Dr. Jessica Lockhart, which will be on sale during the conference.

Further information: http://www.sagatiata.com/toronto-2018/

After Dinner Drinks & Dame Sirith (play performance)

6:30pm, Saturday, July 14, Toronto Reference Library

The dinner on Saturday night is at the Toronto Reference Library, which was designed by architect Raymond Moriyama, opened in 1977, and is the biggest public reference library in Canada. During the dinner there will be a performance of Dame Sirith, the only known English fabliau outside of Chaucer’s works. Dame Sirith is a very short, very silly comic medieval play for four actors: a randy priest, the gullible woman he lusts after, the old “witch” Dame Sirith, and the narrator / puppeteer who also plays a dog. It will be performed by the University of Toronto’s Poculi Ludique Societas, who sponsor productions of early plays, from the beginnings of medieval drama to as late as the middle of the seventeenth century. For more than four decades PLS has performed vivid, powerful, and popular theatre for the people of Toronto and beyond.

Special Exhibits

Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library (120 St. George Street)

Wednesday, July 11 - Friday, July 13

The Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library will be featuring a special monthly highlights exhibit curated by Julia King called “The Fisher’s Tale: Modern and Early Modern Settings of Chaucer’s Works at the University of Toronto” - the library is open to the public 9:00 am-5:00 pm.

University of Toronto Art Museum (7 Hart House Circle)

The University of Toronto Art Museum will be open from 12:00-5:00 pm for the duration of the conference. The Malcove Collection will be of particular interest to conference goers; it features medieval art and objects that are frequently used for classroom teaching in Toronto.

E. J. Pratt Library, Victoria College (71 Queen's Park Crescent E)

The E. J. Pratt Library at Victoria College and the affiliated Centre for Renaissance and Reformation Studies Library is open for visitors to view their early modern astrolabe, Wednesday-Friday. Please check in at the front desk and proceed to the 4th floor.

Program Overview

Tuesday 10 July

Graduate Student Workshop (by application only)
Teacher's Workshop
Trustees' Meeting
Mentoring Dinners

Wednesday 11 July

10:00-10:30      Welcome + First Nations Smudging Ceremony (Isabel Bader Theatre)
10:30-11:00      Readings by Professor Emeritus Carter Revard, Washington University in St Louis (Isabel Bader Theatre)
11:00-12:00      Presidential Lecture - Professor Ardis Butterfield, Yale University (Isabel Bader Theatre)
12:00-1:30        Lunch (boxed or own arrangements)
1:30-3:00          Session 1
3:00-3:30          Coffee break (Victoria College Foyer)
3:30-5:00          Session 2
5:00-5:15          Transition time
5:15-6:00          Members Parliament (Isabel Bader Theatre)
6:00-8:00          Research Expo and Reception (Hart House)

Thursday 12 July

9:00-10:30       Session 3
10:30-11:00     Coffee break (Victoria College Foyer)
11:00-12:30     Plenary Session - Race and Inclusion: Facing Chaucer Studies, Past and Future (Isabel Bader Theatre)
12:30-2:00       Lunch (boxed or own arrangements)
2:00-3:30         Session 4
3:30-4:00         Coffee break (Victoria College Foyer)
3:30-5:30         Session 5
5:30-6:30         Transition time
6:30-8:00         Reception (Art Gallery of Ontario)

Friday 13 July

9:00-10:30       Session 6
10:30-11:00     Coffee break (Victoria College Foyer)
11:00-12:30     Session 7
12:30-2:00       Lunch (boxed or own arrangements)
2:00-3:30         Session 8
3:30-5:30         Special Event at Art Gallery of Ontario - Medieval Ethiopian Manuscripts
5:30-7:00         Transition time
7:00-9:00         Performance of Wahala Dey Oh! (Isabel Bader Theatre)

Saturday 14 July

9:00-10:30       Group 9
10:30-11:00     Coffee break (Victoria College Foyer)
11:00-12:30     Group 10
12:30-2:00      Lunch (boxed or own arrangements)
2:00-3:30         Group 11
3:30-4:00         Coffee break (Victoria College Foyer)
4:00-5:30         The Biennial Chaucer Lecture, Professor Maura Nolan, University of California Berkeley (Isabel Bader Theatre)
5:30-6:00         Transition time
6:30-10:00       Conference Dinner + Performance of Dame Sirith 

Sunday 15 July

9:00                 Six Nations of the Grand River Reservation - Visit and Lunch
10:30               Niagara Wine and Grape Tour and Lunch
12:30               Toronto Ward's Island - Walk and Lunch

Accommodations

Toronto is a popular summer destination; hotels and bed and breakfasts tend to fill up very quickly. We strongly advise you to secure your accommodations as early as possible.

Toronto is also a true "global city" and so accommodations of all sorts are also expensive. To make the conference as accessible as possible, we have reserved on-campus university housing for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, adjunct and contigent faculty, retired members, unwaged scholars, and secondary school teachers only. The rooms available are in the Residence Halls at Victoria University in the University of Toronto. Click on the link to book: reference "The New Chaucer Society" on the accommodation request form to get the special conference rates:

Single (breakfast included)       $75 CAD 
Double (breakfast included)       $101 CAD 

n.b. $1 CAD = $0.75-0.8 USD at time of writing. These rates are guaranteed until 9 April 2018 after which date any unbooked rooms will be released. 

As at NCS 2016 in London, there is no official conference hotel. The small block of rooms reserved by the conference is now full. We encourage you to secure your accommodations at another local area hotel or bed & breakfast. The closest hotel to the conference venue is the Intercontinental Hotel (approx. $400 CAD/night + taxes, 220 Bloor Street West @ Avenue Road, a five minute walk from the conference venue) Further afield but less expensive (approx. $260 CAD/night + taxes at time of writing) is the Holiday Inn Downtown (30 Carlton Street @ Yonge Street, 25 minute walk, 20 minute subway - see Public Transit section of the Pre-Conference Information page). 

Other area hotels we recommend are:

Toronto Marriott Bloor Yorkville (90 Bloor Street East, 10 minute walk, 5 minute subway)
Courtyard Marriott Downtown Toronto (475 Yonge Street, 18 minute walk, 20 minute subway)

Airbnb will often be cheaper than a hotel. If choosing an Airbnb room, please note the distance between your accommodation and the conference venue at Victoria University, which is located at 73 Queen’s Park Crescent. The closest subway stations are Museum (Yonge Line/Line 1); and Bay (Bloor-Danforth Line/Line 2).

We have set up an informal "roommate finder" google sheet for those looking to defray accommodation costs by sharing, https://goo.gl/W54gYD. If you are still having trouble finding affordable accommodation, please email laura.mitchell@utoronto.ca: we will do all we can to help!

Registration

At the congress: Early pick up of registration packets will be open from 1-5pm on Tuesday 10 July, in the foyer of the Victoria College building. Registration will then be open from Wednesday 11 July - Friday 13 July, also in the foyer of Victoria College. 

The local organizing committee for NCS 2018 has raised over $60,000 CAD in sponsorship. We have used this funding to keep registration and costs for the final dinner as low as possible, especially for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, adjunct and contingent faculty, retired members, unwaged scholars, and secondary school teachers - all of whom are eligible for concession rates. Guests - e.g. partners of delegates - may also register at a reduced rate. There are, however, no day rates and no walk-in registrations. The registration fee includes over 80 poster and paper sessions; three plenaries; two receptions and drinks and celebration after the final dinner; musical, dance, and dramatic performances; and tea and coffee breaks.

Registration rates are:

Regular - $245

Concession - $125

Guest  - $125

Boxed lunches are an optional extra, at a cost of $16.50 per lunch. We recommend signing up for these lunches if you want to be sure of getting to the first afternoon session on time. For other options for eating lunch close by, see the conference Map.

The final dinner on Saturday 14 July is also optional. It will be held at the Toronto Public Reference Library with a range of gourmet local foods and drinks provided at stations by Citizen Catering. Costs for the dinner are:

Regular - $125

Concession - $65

Guest  - $125

After registering you will be asked about dietary requirements. We can cater for halal, vegetarian, vegan, and gluten-free diets with enough warning. 

Activities on Sunday 15 July

Excursions must be signed up for on the main registration page at Hart House Tickets. The simplest way to do this is at the same time you register.

Niagara Wine and Grape Tour and Lunch - $150

Ward’s Island - Walk and Lunch - $95

Six Nations of the Grand River Reserve - Visit and Lunch - $90

For more information, see the page on Excursions.



 

Speaking of Chaucer’s Obscenity

Obituaries

An Interim Report on the Standard Edition(s) of The Works of Geoffrey Chaucer

NCS Toronto 2018 Graduate Student Workshop

Now Open: Applications for the Donald Howard Travel Scholarship Fund

NCS Statement About Public Discourse and Civility

Chaucer in Russia: Some Aspects of the History of Chaucer Studies in the Russian Tradition

IN MEMORIAM: LAWRENCE L. BESSERMAN (1945-2017)

Volume 39 (2017)

Sad News: Professor Larry Besserman

Barrie Ruth Straus

In Memoriam: Anne L. Middleton (18 July 1940–23 November 2016)

The Man of Law and the Muslim Ban: A Strategy for Resistance

Chaucer the Stranger

SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY and NEW CHAUCER SOCIETY POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP 2017-18

Volume 38 (2016)

NCS 2018 SESSION PROPOSALS DUE MON, DEC 5

NCS mourns the loss of Anne Middleton

The 2016 Leonard Boyle Dissertation Prize

New Chaucer Society Early Career Essay Prize

Search for New NCS Executive Director/home

Notes from the Teachers’ Business Meeting at the 2016 Congress

Flipping the Archive: Tulane’s Archives and Outreach Program

2016 Congress Committees

Program Committee
Emily Steiner and Kellie Robertson (Co-chairs)
Arthur Bahr, Anke Bernau, Aditi Nafde, and Will Robins, with Ruth Evans and Susan Crane ex officio.

Graduate Workshop
Aditi Nafde (Organizer)
Jessica Brantley, Alex Da Costa, Orietta Da Rold, Dan Wakelin, Alex Gillespie, Simon Horobin

Local Organizing Committee
Anthony Bale and Lawrence Warner (Co-chairs)
Julia Boffey, Tony Edwards, and Sarah Salih

Disabled Attendees

Access between congress venues on the Queen Mary University of London site is step-free and the entire campus is disability friendly. See http://www.dds.qmul.ac.uk/disability/ about QMUL buildings. London buses mostly have ramps for step-free access. Many tube stations have lots of stairs and no lifts/elevators, so it is best to check with https://tfl.gov.uk/transport-accessibility/ as you plan your travels. Taxis on the street are plentiful. Email or message Anthony Bale if you have more specific questions: apbale@gmail.com.

Information for Disabled Attendees at the NCS Congress in London

Useful Information

We are delighted to welcome the delegates of the New Chaucer Society Congress to London and do hope you have an enjoyable and productive stay. Below is some general information that may be useful during your visit.

Registration:

This is in the lobby of the Arts 2 building at Queen Mary, Mile End. There is a noticeboard where you can leave notes for delegates in the Octagon room. There will be a campus map in your registration pack, or you can consult the online map here:
www.qmul.ac.uk/docs/about/26065.pdf

PowerPoint and internet access:

All classrooms at Queen Mary are equipped with the necessary AV requirement and the entire campus is WiFi enabled. Presenters using power point should bring their presentations on a memory stick; you may also wish to store your presentation online ‘in the cloud’. Please make sure the presentation is PC-compatible as all computers on campus are PCs and the network will not allow connections to external computers.

There are two main ways to connect to WiFi at the Congress – either via the eduroam network or via the Guest network.
Eduroam: Queen Mary participates in eduroam (education roaming), a secure, world-wide roaming access service developed for the international research and education community that allows students and researchers to obtain internet connectivity across campus by simply opening their laptops. Do note that eduroam has to be installed prior to arrival to guarantee free and immediate internet access on campus. Many institutions provide technical assistance on how to install eduroam.
Guest network:
1. From your Device\PC\Mac enable your Wi-Fi and search for QM-College-Wi-Fi
2. Connect to the ‘QM-Events-Wi-Fi’
3. You will be presented with the page requesting your password:
4. PASSWORD: ZhuY3201
5. A final page will be shown advising ‘Network access is enabled, Please close page and continue to use the Wi-Fi

Around London, hotels offer free WiFi and many cafés and pubs have WiFi hotspots. The is also WiFi on the tube while the train is in the station.

Family room:

For the first time, New Chaucer Congress includes a family room. This room is in the Bancroft building, room G07. You can think of it as a lactation or feeding room, but also as a rendezvous room for partners and kids, a place to chill out with a tired child, a place to leave stuff like toys, buggies. We need to be clear that it's not a special facility in any way - i.e. no sink, no special equipment - but the idea is to give a place where you can feel more comfortable; especially too, where partners or baby-sitters can wait without feeling out-of place at the conference. The room does have chairs, electrical sockets and wifi. Contact Alexandra Gillespie about this room. There is also a Facebook group, coordinated by Alexandra, to share advice and babysitting.

Quiet space and meeting rooms:

We have several spaces around campus for you to withdraw to. The Senior Common Room (SCR) in the Queen’s Building will be open for people to sit and talk. Please feel free to use the following rooms for meetings or quiet time:
Arts Two – rooms 2.18 and 3.17
Bancroft – rooms 1.01.1, 1.01.2, 1.02.6, 1.08

Computer room:

There will be a computer room on campus available to delegates.

Climate and Clothing:

The weather is forecast to be mild (20C) but changeable, with showers and sun. The British summer is rarely cold but rarely dry. It’s best to bring a mini umbrella or a light rainproof jacket.

Credit Cards:

Credit Cards are widely accepted throughout London. The major cards in England are MASTERCARD and VISA, and AMERICAN EXPRESS is also widely accepted. Cash can be obtained at every bank branch as well as in all ATMs throughout the city. There are several ATMS at and around the Queen Mary campus, including one at The Curve on Westfield Way and another on Mile End Road near the People’s Palace.

Currency Exchange:

The British pound sterling is at a low against the US dollar and the Euro, due to the unprecedented political and constitutional crisis in the UK. Rates have been fluctuating recently. You can change currency at the airport, at post offices, at banks, and in some larger shops (such as Marks & Spencer), although it is now usually cheaper to withdraw cash from an ATM.

Shopping and Tax free:

London is a great city for shopping, and it would be impossible to summarise the opportunities for shopping. The mainstream shopping area of the city is at Oxford Street and Regent Street (Oxford Circus tube); this includes large fashion retailers, the boutiques around Carnaby Street, and Selfridges department store. The huge shopping mall at Westfield Stratford is very close to Queen Mary (Stratford tube). Other areas for fun shopping include Covent Garden (Covent Garden tube) for smaller stylish clothing boutiques; Borough Market (London Bridge tube) for gourmet food in a historic setting; Spitalfields Market and Shoreditch/Brick Lane (Liverpool Street tube) for hipster crafts, dining, clothes, design. Value Added Tax (VAT) is included on most goods at the rate of 20% and can be claimed back by non-EU tourists spending over about £75 in any one shop: see http://www.visitlondon.com/traveller-information/essential-information/money/tax-free?ref=nav, for forms, which need to be stamped.

Exercise:

There are splendid running/jogging tracks alongside the Regent’s Canal and through the Mile End Park (on the green bridge near the tube station). The campus gym at QMUL Is the QMotion gym, 15 Godward Square: it is £6.50 for a day pass (see https://www.qmsu.org/qmotion/). There is a better-equipped gym at Soho Gym at Bow Wharf (221 Grove Road), which does an unlimited one-month membership for £49.99; £5 one-off trial tickets are available on the Soho Gyms website.

Electricity current:

Remember, you’ll need to bring adaptors for your electrical goods: every socket uses a three-pin plug, 230 voltage.

Pharmacies, emergency and medical help:

Pharmacy
Nearby pharmacies include Chrischem, 578 Mile End Road; Forward Pharmacy, 648 Mile End Road; Boots, 426 Bethnal Green Road.
Emergencies
The emergency number (when there is a risk to life, or if a crime is being committed) for the Emergency Services (Fire, Police, Ambulance) is 999. The non-emergency number is 111. The nearest hospital Accident and Emergency department is at The Royal London Hospital, opposite Whitechapel tube station.

Telephones and mobile phones:

The code for United Kingdom from overseas is +44. Direct long-distance calls can be made to Europe and the USA by dialling 00 plus the country code, and the number you wish to reach. There are major mobile phone operators all over the city: O2, EE, Vodafone are some of the largest: they will be able to sell you a pay-as you-go SIM card.

Tipping and tax:

VAT is invariably included in advertised prices. Tipping is a contentious issue amongst the British, with no uniform practice: many restaurants will include an ‘optional’ 12.5% charge on the bill. If this is not on the bill, it’s normal to make a 10% to 15% tip in a restaurant. Tips may be given in taxis, usually by rounding up. It’s not normal to tip in a bar where there is no table service.

Transportation:

London is served by six airports. You should allow a journey time of at least 70 minutes to any London airport (apart from London City) from Mile End. 

Licensed taxi (‘Black cab’ with a Hackney Carriage License) services are abundant in London, but are expensive for longer journeys; a black cab to Queen Mary will cost in the region of £65 (one-way) from Heathrow, or £110 (one-way) from Gatwick. Not all black cabs accept credit cards. We cannot recommend taking unlicensed minicabs.

For planning your travel around London, we recommend using the Transport for London (TfL) web service available at www.tfl.gov.uk or the Google Maps app. Fares on buses, tubes, and overground trains are paid either by Oyster card or with a ‘contactless’ debit/credit card; cash tickets for the tube and for trains can be bought at ticket machines at stations, but cash is no longer accepted on London buses. Therefore the most convenient way of getting around if you do not have a contactless credit/debit card is to acquire an Oyster card on your first trip on the underground (usually when you arrive at the airport).

There is also the Santander cycle scheme. Cycling can be a great way to get around, but if you cycle in London, remember that we drive on the left! Details here: https://tfl.gov.uk/modes/cycling/santander-cycles

Tourist information:

See www.visitlondon.com

We will provide guides to Canterbury in your Congress pack.

Food and drink:

Pubs:
Spending hours sitting and drinking in a pub is still a normal way of passing the time for many Londoners. Beer and cider (which is always alcoholic) are served in pint or half-pint measures. All of the following pubs are within a 10 minute walk from Queen Mary; all serve food
The Coborn Arms, 8 Coborn Rd, Bow, London E3 2DA
The Victoria, 110 Grove Rd, London E3 5TH
The Lord Tredegar, Lichfield Rd, Bow, London E3 5AT
The Morgan Arms, 43 Morgan St, Bow, London E3 5AA

Cafés:
The Sugar Cube, 383A Mile End Road, small booth selling coffee, pastries, crepes and milkshakes near Starbucks
The Coffee Room, 6A Grove Rd, London EX 5AX; great coffee and cake in a cute cafe
Also The Pizza Room, next door, run by the same Italian team
The Pavilion, on the corner of Old Ford Rd in Victoria Park, London E9 7DE (by the lake in Victoria Park: good coffee and food)
The ubiquitous Starbucks and Costa are available for coffee and snacks, on the Mile End Road near Mile End tube station.

Some tips for dining:

There are hundreds of restaurants in London, and excellent street markets like at Borough Market and Maltby Street Market, for street food. There are several supermarkets near Queen Mary, including the Cooperative and Sainsbury’s on Mile End Rd. Within the East End, the curry houses (many of them halal) and all-night bagel/beigel bakeries (on Brick Lane, about 25 minute walk, a short taxi ride) are worth visiting. Almost all restaurants in London will have a vegetarian option and there are many excellent specialist vegan and gluten-free restaurants around the city.

Here are just a few local tips for good value local food:
Ariana, 2 Midlothian Rd, London E3 4SE (Iranian café/restaurant in Mile End park)
The Greedy Cow, 2 Grove Rd, London E3 5AX (range of burgers)
The Orange Room, 63 Burdett Rd, London E3 4TN (Lebanese café)
Verdi’s, 237 Mile End Rd, London E1 4AA (Italian restaurant)

For up-scale dining in the East End, Bistrotheque is usually excellent and a short walk from Queen Mary; Merchant’s Tavern in Old Street in really lovely; Jago off Brick Lane may be thought pretentious but the food is quite good in a distinct setting; Blixen in Spitalfields is great, good value for an elegant dinner.

Contacts:

The Local Organising Committee is chaired by Anthony Bale (a.bale@bbk.ac.uk) and Lawrence Warner (lawrence.warner@kcl.ac.uk). Please contact us if you have any questions.
The other members of the Local Organising Committee are Julia Boffey, Tony Edwards, and Sarah Salih.

 

NCS mourns the loss of Richard Neuse

Vol. 38, No. 1 - Spring 2016

NCS mourns the loss of Judith Bronfman

Saint Louis University - NEW CHAUCER SOCIETY POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP 2016-17

Vol. 37, No. 2 - Fall 2015

Original Call for Papers

 

The main venue for NCS in July 2016 will be the leafy and beautiful campus of Queen Mary, University of London, located at Mile End (site of Richard II's meeting with the rebels of 1381). QMUL is easily accessible to central London via tube (Central Line) and bus. There will be rooms for all who request them in the on-campus dorms. An afternoon is set aside for excursions, which will depart from QMUL's campus at Charterhouse Square, near the Barbican. These will include, for instance, walking tours of medieval London and of the Charterhouse itself, and a trip to Eltham Palace. The site of the final reception and Biennial Chaucer Lecture by Stephanie Trigg will be The Brewery, even closer to the Barbican, a beautifully restored eighteenth-century brewery. We are also planning a trip to Canterbury on the Friday after the conference.

 

 

SESSION TYPES
Paper panel: A paper session showcases scholarly work in the form of extended presentations. A paper panel should include no more than 3 presenters total (either 3 papers or 2 papers and a respondent) and should allow for at least 30 minutes of open discussion.
Roundtable:  The goal of a roundtable is to focus discussion on a narrow topic, theme, or question, such as "John Shirley", or "Chaucer's 'Retraction.'" Roundtables should include no more than 5 presenters and allow for at least 30 minutes of open discussion.
Seminar: The goal of a seminar is to generate extended conversation about a topic (e.g., "Re-Orienting Disability"), before, during, and after the NCS meeting. Participants are encouraged to circulate and discuss materials in advance of the seminar. Seminars should include no more than 7 presenters and allow for at least one hour of open discussion. 
Poster sessions: Poster sessions are groupings of posters on a particular topic; each thread will have a group of posters associated with it. During the conference, all posters will be displayed in a single timeslot, with presenters in attendance to discuss their work and answer questions.

THREAD 1: LONDON: BOOKS, TEXTS, LIVES
Organizers: Bruce Holsinger (bwholsinger@gmail.com) and Marion Turner (marion.turner@jesus.ox.ac.uk)

1. London Living: Topographies, Orientations, Hardware 
Organizer: Sarah Stanbury (sstanbur@holycross.edu)
Roundtable
We invite short papers on getting in and out of buildings and rooms, or in and out of the City, and on the voicing of these practices in Chaucer’s writings and in contemporary maps and texts. Papers might also focus on the hardware of London living: doors, locks, walls, windows, and furnishings, or on its lexicon--words, often bilingual, for the stuff and spaces of daily life. Pedagogical papers are also invited on the use of web resources, such as the Museum of London, for teaching students at various levels about London material culture.

2. London Bridge 
Organizer: Catherine Sanok (sanok@umich.edu)
Paper panel
London Bridge was both an entry to and limit of the medieval city. It was an important site of medieval pageants, including royal entries and other forms of civic and social performance, at the same time that it was a place of residence, commerce, and religious practice. Papers that address discussions of London Bridge in literary, historiographical, hagiographical, and legal texts, as well those that explore performance traditions, records of the material culture of performances, and the texts of specific pageants that took place on London Bridge are all welcome. Papers may also attend to the Bridge as a limit of the city’s jurisdiction and of London citizenship, or to the place of London Bridge in imaginative and real itineraries and geographies.

3. London and the Senses 
Organizer: Marion Turner (marion.turner@ell.ox.ac.uk)
Roundtable
Cities stimulate the senses in particular ways: the writings of Chaucer and his contemporaries evoke for us in myriad ways the sounds of the city, what things felt like – and what there was to touch - what was seen, the kinds of things people smelt and tasted. This roundtable asks contributors to discuss the following question: how did medieval London look, smell, taste, and feel? Papers that engage with medieval and modern theories about how we use our senses are encouraged. Contributors might also consider how the senses are dealt with in the brain e.g. how metaphor affects the sensory cortex, or how traumatic sensory experiences are imagined in the mind. 

4. Environing London
Organizer: Jeffrey Jerome Cohen (jjcohen@gwu.edu)
Roundtable
This roundtable gathers some recent work by medievalists and others on ecology and ecotheory. It asks participants to discuss, what happens when we consider London as an urban ecosystem that surrounds (that is, environs) overlapping systems of life while being environed by others (the Thames as estuarine microclimate, weather in constant flux or as part of a Little Ice Age, the long durations of geological history)? Short papers will provoke a lively discussion of the impress of ecosystem on text, and of the possibility of reading ecological change and catastrophe from the literary archive. This session will welcome papers that ruminate over longues durées, so that A Burnable Book meets the Book of the Duchess meets the fossil record and archives of ice and fire.

5. Foreign Capital: Texts, Contact, and Culture in Late Medieval London 
Organizer: Sebastian Sobecki (s.i.sobecki@rug.nl)
Paper panel
London was home to Flemish craftsmen, Genoese merchants, and Hanseatic agents. Londoners travelled abroad to fight, trade, pray, and persuade. How do literary and pragmatic writings register London’s many interactions with the wider world? What was the contribution of alien communities, foreign scribes, and visiting dignitaries to London’s cultural fabric? How do texts negotiate the city’s desire to be a trading emporium with the residual xenophobia of many of its residents? How do London’s named and anonymous poets encounter foreign culture at home and abroad?
 
6. Literary Afterlives of Medieval London 
Organizer: Bruce Holsinger (bwholsinger@gmail.com) 
Roundtable
This roundtable will consider Chaucer’s London in the long view: literary imaginings of the premodern city in poetry, fiction, and drama from the fifteenth century through the twenty-first. Short papers are welcome on medievalism, literary history in the longue durée, historical fiction and fantasy set in medieval London, the aesthetics and politics of place, and related topics. What are the stories that various literary traditions have told about medieval London? Papers from fiction writers and poets are strongly encouraged.  
 
7. Mile End 
Organizers: Julia Boffey (j.boffey@qmul.ac.uk) and Alfred Hiatt (a.hiatt@qmul.ac.uk)
Paper panel
Mile End resonates with Chaucerians on a number of counts.  On the main eastern approach route to London, it was a mile from Aldgate, Chaucer’s place of residence from 1374-86.  In 1381 it was the location of Richard II’s encounter with a large company of Essex rebels.  A short way east of Mile End was the Benedictine Priory of nuns at St Leonard’s, in Stratford-atte-Bowe. This session capitalizes on the congress’s location at Mile End by inviting new explorations of ways that the local area figures in, or can be related to, Chaucer’s writings.

8. Teaching London’s Literary Forms 
Organizer: Corey Sparks (ctsparks@csuchico.edu)
Roundtable 
From identifications of London as “New Troy” to descriptions of its role as a commercial center, the city takes on myriad forms in medieval literature. This pedagogically-oriented roundtable considers how we engage London’s diverse, sometimes idiosyncratic forms with our students. Possible questions to consider include: What literary forms do we tend to align with medieval London (e.g., chronicle, romance, prison writing?)? What relations might we draw with students between texts written about London and those written in London? From essays and florilegia to maps and models, what kinds of assignments might students produce to critically and creatively engage London and literary form?

THREAD 2: ERROR
Organizers: Anthony Bale (a.bale@bbk.ac.uk) and Steven Kruger (skruger@gc.cuny.edu)

9. Queer Manuscripts: The Textuality of Error
Organizers: Roberta Magnani (r.magnani@swansea.ac.uk) and Dianne Watt (d.watt@surrey.ac.uk)
Roundtable
Over twenty years ago Carolyn Dinshaw argued for a queering of Chaucer's manuscripts. Since then, the framing of medieval studies through queer theory has offered valuable avenues of investigation (studies by Klosowska, Kruger, Burger, Lochrie, Pugh, Watt, to mention but a few). Dinshaw's initial engagement with the materiality of Chaucer’s manuscripts and, in particular, with their queer margins has, however, been largely neglected. This session seeks to re-assess the queerness of manuscripts produced and circulating at the time of Chaucer. It aims to investigate the multiple ways in which erroneous identities (gender and otherwise), non-directional temporalities and spatiality, as well as queer hermeneutics are at once policed and performed in the material space of the codex.

10. Textual Error/Textual Correction
Organizer: Thomas Farrell (tjfarrel@stetson.edu)
Roundtable
Our conceptions of textual error are as deeply problematic—and as readily ironized—as the other questions of identity and behavior proposed for this thread. This roundtable session invites succinct (5-10 minute) discussions of such topics as the nature of "error," mouvance vs. "error," the origins of error in manuscripts (and editions), the propagation of error through manuscripts (and editions), the uses and value of error, the correction of error, and theoretical or methodological approaches to "error" in Middle English (especially Chaucerian) texts.

11. Problem Texts 
Organizer: Megan Cook (mlcook@colby.edu)
Paper Panel 
This panel will explore the role that cruxes and problem texts play in our understanding of Middle English literature, both Chaucerian and otherwise. Papers might discuss apocryphal works, variant readings, and unfinished or incomplete texts, as well as textual corruption, grammatical and syntactical ambiguity, and editorial cruxes. Papers might also consider how such texts challenge scholarly categories of error and correctness, as well as received authorial and literary histories, and call into question conventional editorial practices and modes of interpretation. How can embracing textual problems open up new ways of reading?

12. Scribal Error
Organizers: Andrew Kraebel (akraebel@trinity.edu) and Daniel Wakelin (daniel.wakelin@ell.ox.ac.uk)
Paper panel
Scholarship over the past twenty-five years has rightly helped us to praise ‘variance’, notably in excellent work distinguishing ‘copying’ from ‘scribal authorship’. And yet the increase in attention to manuscript texts (especially through digital facsimiles) might now invite reappraisal and skepticism. Scholars are less willing to see careful intentionality behind every scribal variant. Might the phrase ‘scribal error’ merit its pejorative connotations? Might unwilled error nonetheless be informative or interesting in other ways? Is error itself identified only by an ascription of intentionality, or unfulfilled intention? What, then, constitutes a significant variant in this more skeptical age? 

13. Overlapping Errors
Organizer: Robert Sturges (Robert.Sturges@asu.edu)
Paper panel
This session invites papers that consider the imbrication of different forms of “error,” and the representation of such imbrications, as medieval cultural phenomena. In what ways do overlapping “errors” in bodies, behaviors and beliefs serve to define, limit, and/or extend one another in medieval cultural representations? How does the representation of overlap among “erroneous” races, classes, genders, sexualities, religions, etc. in a single subject serve to define that subject as well as its “correct” Other? How do simultaneous “errors” in different categories reinforce—or weaken the force of—one another?

14. Reason Gone Wrong
Organizer: John Longo (jlongo@css.org)
Roundtable
Chaucer’s characters frequently engage one another in argument and debate, often at crucial narrative junctures, and the poorer—that is, the less valid or cogent—argument often wins the day, sometimes with disastrous consequences. This session asks how teachers might integrate Chaucer’s dramatization of faulty inference and fallacious reasoning (especially in the context of high-stakes argument) into a broader course or unit on persuasion and argumentation. Can we imagine Chaucer sharing a syllabus with political speeches and commercial advertisements; or fitting into a course exploring the importance of classical or scholastic logic to medieval literature?

15. Early Modern Readers ‘Correcting’ Medieval Texts
Organizers: Clarissa Chenovick (cchenovick@gmail.com) and Frederic Clark (fnclark@gmail.com)
Paper panel
The castigation and correction of medieval error proved an obsessive concern of early modern English bibliophiles, particularly in response to monastic books put into private hands by the Dissolution. However, reformist insistence on the profound moral and spiritual import of textual correction was arguably nothing new. This panel will consider how early modern modes of textual correction, in the form of manuscript annotation and emendation, rewritings, censorship, and additions, grew out of dialogue with medieval attitudes towards error and correction. To what extent did medieval notions of correction inform the Renaissance rhetoric of renewal? Moreover, how might analysis of the evolution of correctio as concept influence approaches to the medieval/early modern divide? 

16. The Legend of Good Women: Chaucer's Mistake?
Organizers: Betsy McCormick (BMcCormick@MtSAC.edu); Leah Schwebel (leah.schwebel@gmail.com); and Lynn Shutters  (Lynn.Shutters@colostate.edu).
Roundtable
Repetitive, dull, uninspired, and incomplete: these are some of the criticisms hurled at Chaucer’s Legend of Good Women. In 2006, Carolyn Collette observed that the poem “seems either to intrigue or annoy its modern readers – but rarely . . . to satisfy them.” For some, the Legend remains the ugly duckling of the Chaucer canon, a work whose melodramatic extremes, roster of dead, “good,” women, and complex textual history render it a curious but unsatisfying detour in Chaucer’s career. This roundtable does not seek to rescue the Legend from ignominy, but rather to address failure as an important feature of the poem. What does it mean for a work to be bad, especially for the author of the Tale of Sir Thopas? How do we assess the Legend women – are they indeed bad examples of hagiography or female conduct? Finally, how do we assess critical interpretations of bad texts, interpretations that may or may not be just as erroneous?

THREAD 3: MEDIEVAL MEDIA 
Organizers: William Robins (william.robins@utoronto.ca) and Katherine Zieman (ziemank@gmail.com)

17. Studying Chaucer in a Digital Culture
Organizer: Kara Crawford (crawfordk@bishops.com)
Roundtable
As teachers and students in a digital culture we engage in new modes of reading even as we participate in a global community that exists in constant interaction. How does digital culture impact our study and teaching of Chaucer? Do some elements of Chaucer’s work become newly relevant in the classroom, perhaps especially in a multilingual setting? Do activities such as gaming, social media, and digital resources, invite us to revisit medieval practices of ludic play, collaborative authorship, and manuscript reading, or do they lead us in other directions altogether? 

18. Charisma 
Organizers: Irina Dumitrescu (irinaalexandradumitrescu@gmail.com) and Laura Saetveit Miles (Laura.Miles@if.uib.no)
Paper panel
Why do certain stories become bestsellers, repeatedly translated and adapted to other media? Why are some characters particularly appealing, the stars of vitae, poems, and paintings? This panel examines the workings of charisma, popularity, and fascination in the premodern period. Papers might call on Max Weber’s discussion of charismatic authority, Peter Brown’s of the saint as exemplar, Joseph Roach’s of the celebrity “it” factor, or Stephen Jaeger’s of the redeeming power of enchantment. The goal is to begin a conversation about how charisma – transferred over time between media and audiences but never lost – might function as a productive mode of understanding cultural systems. 

19. Medieval Multimodalities/Digital Multimodalities
Organizers: Katharine Jager (jagerk@uhd.edu) and Dorothy Kim (dokim@vassar.edu) 
Seminar
From Digital Rhetoric and Digital Humanities, multimodality considers the ways by which sound, image, and text commingle. We seek a reconsideration of old media—the manuscript page—as it existed at a particularly dynamic medieval juncture when new forms and texts emerged to remediate literary oeuvres, genres, images, and sound technologies. How does multimodality help evaluate the current explosion of flexible media possibilities, but also the creative possibilities of manuscript studies? How might the critical work on medieval multimodalities, engage with questions of performativity, sound and literary genre? How can an experimental mode of remediation help reframe and re-theorize multimodality? Short seminar papers will be posted ahead of time as reading for participants. 

20. Beyond the Imagetext
Organizers: Jessica Brantley (jessica.brantley@yale.edu) and Ingrid Nelson (inelson@amherst.edu)
Roundtable
This roundtable invites submissions that examine how particular manuscripts, theories, or methodologies of textual criticism (such as “New Philology”) can shape or be shaped by media theory.  It welcomes contributions that reimagine the “imagetext” paradigm of manuscript studies to expand our understanding of the species of media within and around manuscript contents and production; that critique or expand models of textual criticism using media theoretical concepts; that insightfully use medieval manuscripts as a paradigm for studies of “new” media forms; or that suggest ways to reimagine practices of literary interpretation and reading based on media ecologies of the medieval manuscript. 

21. Media and the Medieval Manuscript
Organizers: Linne Mooney (linne.mooney@york.ac.uk) and Wendy Scase (w.l.scase@bham.ac.uk)
Paper panel
What can manuscript studies offer the study of post-medieval media, and how might the family of disciplines that comprise manuscript studies be enlarged and reconfigured in the light of recent approaches to and uses of post-medieval media and technology? These sessions invite contributions to facilitate reflection on current and future encounters between post-medieval media and medieval manuscripts. Submissions might consider: the interfaces between manuscript materiality and immaterial technologies; multimedia approaches to understanding medieval literacy; new and future digital resources  (the potential and pitfalls of online crowdsourcing, public engagement, and pedagogy in manuscript studies); and social network theory and textual studies. 

22. How They Thought Then
Organizers: Sarah Noonan (sarahloleet@gmail.com) and Katherine Zieman (zieman@gmail.com) 
Paper panel
This panel solicits papers that examine the relationship between medieval media technologies and their human users. How do media technologies such as mise-en-page, paratextual and decorative features, material formats, and textual form suggest certain modes of engagement with written or visual media?  Proposals are particularly welcome that exemplify how the interdisciplinary approaches encouraged by media studies might revise current understandings of the reception and production of manuscripts or images in the Middle Ages or that consider the relation of contemplative technologies, scribal technologies, documentary technologies to modes of cognition, attention, and perception. 

23. The Audible Medieval Past
Organizer: Joseph Taylor (wjt0003@uah.edu)
Paper panel
Sound Studies has complicated our histories of the production and reception of sound through attention to the cultural and political contexts surrounding the emergence of modern technologies. This session asks how critical attention to premodern sounds could further recent discussions in medieval studies about body, object, sensation and experience, the linguistic and the extra-linguistic. How does the manuscript, the medieval church, or other physical remnants offer mediums for approaching premodern soundscapes in our criticism and our classrooms? Papers might consider medieval theories of sound, aural encounters, and the intimacies of the written text and its sonic reproduction.  

THREAD 4: SCIENTIAE
Organizers: Kellie Robertson (krobert@umd.edu) and D. Vance Smith (dvsmith@princeton.edu)

24. Popularizing Pedagogy in the Late Middle Ages 
Organizers:  Susie Phillips (susie-phillips@northwestern.edu) and Claire Waters (cmwaters@ucdavis.edu)
Seminar 
This seminar invites participants to engage with the pedagogical innovations of the late Middle Ages, considering particularly how forms and technologies of teaching (written, depicted or performed) were transformed and adapted for new audiences.  Guiding our conversation is a set of central questions: By what means was “higher” learning—philosophical, theological, scientific—transmitted beyond the university and the monastery? How did manuscripts and other visual media present and organize such knowledge with an eye to increasing its accessibility? What new areas of “popular” learning emerged that appropriated and adapted more formal subjects of scholarly exploration? Participants will pre-circulate either a primary text particularly relevant to their work or a brief position paper outlining that work, to be read by all participants in preparation for the seminar.

25. The University II.0
Organizers: Thomas Goodmann (tgoodmann@miami.edu) and Thomas Prendergast (tprendergast@wooster.edu) 
Paper panel 
We seek papers that explore the disciplining of knowledge in its social and material constructions in the medieval and post-medieval university.  Relatively little work has been done on the social space of universities since Rashdall. In light of David Wallace’s Europe: A Literary History, 1348-1418, and its approach via “transnational sequences of interconnected places,” it is timely to revisit universities as transcultural sites of training and social empowerment, of intellectual exchange and dissent. We are interested particularly in contemplations of the postmodern university in terms of the medieval university, including constructions of the liberal arts, the faculty, “the university in ruins,” and the university as corporation.

26. The Experience of Fiction
Organizers: Marco Nievergelt (marco.nievergelt@unil.ch) and Julie Orlemanski (julieorlemanski@uchicago.edu)
Roundtable
This roundtable explores the role of fiction in medieval culture. How did writers and readers understand and experience explicitly imaginary phenomena? How was fictionality signalled, imagined, interpreted, cognized, embodied, valued or devalued? How was it used? What role did fictional thinking, or thinking about fiction, play in (for instance) scholastic disputation, philosophical speculation, claims to authority, portrayals of the pagan gods, evasions of censure or censorship, religious devotion, or instances of literary reflexivity? If the “fact” was not an important concept in medieval discourse, what was fiction defined against? Finally, how might “fictional thinking” in the Middle Ages intersect contemporary debates – about cognition and embodied simulation, about the ontology of possible worlds, and about the history of epistemological regimes?

27. Language and the Mathematical Imaginary
Organizer: Tekla Bude (tlb33@cam.ac.uk)
Paper panel
From Theseus’ panoptic theatre, measured by arsmetrik, to the multiplication of sound in the House of Fame, mathematics and poetics intersect for many reasons, and in many ways, in Chaucer’s poetry, as it does in the work of his contemporaries. This panel will consider any aspect of the mathematical imagination in the late medieval period: how and to what ends do concepts of proof and provability, maxima/minima, beginnings/ceasings, measurement, and numerosity appear in English poetry of the 14th and 15th centuries? Papers may address any aspect of the intersection of mathematics and language across any number of genres, and might also query how the mathematical in medieval language informs more modern critiques, from Kant to Badiou.   

28. Household Knowledges
Organizer: Glenn Burger (gburger@gc.cuny.edu)
Roundtable
By the later Middle Ages, gentry and urban bourgeois households become important sites for the consumption of literary, religious, and “applied knowledge” texts, producing new author functions and forms of textual production.   What is the relation between the multi-purposed and hybrid spaces in such households – for example those that mix public and private, business and domestic, masculine and feminine, lay and religious – and the knowledges produced by them?  How might thinking about such households as actor networks – bringing servant, master/mistress, material object, extended family history into intimate relation with each other –  generate different understandings of the knowledges generated from within such units.  How might the household miscellany, conduct literature, or other more tangential kinds of literary texts function as technologies for such household knowledges?  

29. Curiositas
Organizer: Patricia Ingham (pingham@indiana.edu)
Paper panel
Curiosity--whether medieval or modern--proves a tricky concept that resists categorization. Indeed, it often reveals the limits of the system of thought that tries to define or domesticate it. The Middle Ages are represented invariably as a time utterly and monolithically opposed to curiosity, yet the record suggests a complex set of ethical, aesthetic, or philosophical questions. Concerns over curiositas (and the vice of curiosity) emerge in debates about natural philosophy as well as writerly style, utility and fashion, travel and contemplation, or the vicissitudes of novelty. And even contemporary theorizations of curiosity are more ambivalent than we expect. While ‘positive psychology’ proponents such as Todd Kashdan have claimed the absolute centrality of curiosity to human cognition (and mental well-being), Sianne Ngai, theorizing postmodern aesthetics, has argued that the “curious” has been displaced by the “interesting.” Papers engaging any aspect of this mercurial concept are welcome.  

30. Encyclopedic Experiments
Organizers: Kellie Robertson (krobert@umd.edu) and Emily Steiner (steinere@sas.upenn.edu)
Paper panel
Encyclopedic compendia flourished in both Latin and the vernaculars during the late medieval period. This panel seeks papers that explore how the encyclopedic imperative to “know everything” was translated into popular literary forms. Beyond providing “raw” source material for late medieval writers, what ambitions did the encyclopedic imagination instill in them? What generic experiments (successful and otherwise) did it provoke? How did writers aspire to or rebel against the mandate for a comprehensive knowledge? Ideally, papers would engage the problem of whether or not we can identify a theory of taxonomy or an enumerative aesthetic that seems unique to the late medieval period. 

THREAD 5: CHAUCERIAN NETWORKS
Organizers: Peter Brown (p.brown@kent.ac.uk) and Shayne Legassie (shayne@email.unc.edu)

31. Networks in Late-Medieval Manuscripts 
Organizer: Michael Madrinkian (michael.madrinkian@hertford.ox.ac.uk)
Roundtable
This session will assess the various networks surrounding vernacular English manuscripts in the age of Chaucer. When dealing with an individual codex one must account for the multifarious networks to which it is tied, such as scribal interaction or collaboration, textual coteries, sources of patronage, and so on. This session invites papers that deal with this complex issue from a variety of perspectives. Possible topics include methodological practice for approaching manuscript networks, new connections or affiliations between vernacular manuscripts, connections with patronage, scribal interaction, coteries of readership, and network theory in relation late-medieval manuscripts.

32. The East of England 
Organizer: Stephen Partridge (sbp@mail.ubc.ca)
Paper panel
This session aims to consolidate and extend research on cultural networks outside London in the east of England between 1380-1530, focusing on Essex, Suffolk, Norfolk, and/or Kent. Possible topics include: patronage, production, and reception of Chaucerian manuscripts; “Chaucerian” writing (e.g. Lydgate) in its local context; relations between Chaucerian and non-Chaucerian cultural production (e.g. devotional writing); relations between literature and other arts; connections between the eastern counties and London, including early printers; links with other parts of England other than London; eastern networks for the reception of Continental influences, including those which affected the production of Chaucerian manuscripts and the nature of Chaucerian texts; relations between the religious orders and secular patronage and production.

33. Richard Bury and His Circle 
Organizer: Neil Cartlidge (n.m.r.cartlidge@durham.ac.uk) 
Paper panel
The group of writers associated with Richard Bury, Bishop of Durham 1333–45, has been described as ”the single most notable circle or sequence of scholars under the patronage of one person in fourteenth-century England” (ODNB, s.v. ‘Bury, Richard’). This group includes such major figures as Thomas Bradwardine, Robert Holcot, Walter Burley, Richard Kilvington and Richard Fitzralph. Papers in this panel might include considerations of any of these writers individually (either directly in relation to Chaucer or in the context of the history of ideas of the fourteenth century more generally); they might also discuss the influence and interests of this group as a whole, and the ways in which could be seen as a network of exchange, or an interpretative community.

34. Town and Country Networks in Chaucerian Britain 
Organizer: Helen Fulton (helen.fulton@bristol.ac.uk)
Paper panel
This panel of three 20-minute papers looks at aspects of social networking in Britain, urban and rural, which relate to Chaucer's life and his writing. The aim of the session is to show how professional and political networks in fourteenth-century Britain informed the interpersonal links which are central to Chaucer's literary work.

35. Chaucer Before and After Hoccleve 
Organizers: Elon Lang (emlang@austin.utexas.edu) and Aditi Nafde (Aditi.Nafde@newcastle.ac.uk)
Roundtable
This roundtable seeks papers that address the influence and afterlife of manuscripts and text-makers that contributed to the continuity and development of England’s literary culture both during and after Chaucer’s life. We invite proposals that consider the networks of poets, scribes, books, and other cultural influences that led to Hoccleve's famous identification of Chaucer as his poetic "fadir" and as the "firste fyndere of our fair langage". What textual and cultural networks may have supported Chaucer's early canonization and contributed to the broader fabric of late medieval literature? How might Chaucer’s as well as Hoccleve’s and others’ influence help us reposition the center of late medieval literary and material culture?

36. Bohemia 
Organizer: Michael Van Dussen (michael.vandussen@mcgill.ca)
Paper panel
For Chaucer and some contemporaries, Bohemia represented an eastern horizon, biblically and orientally charged, embodied by Anne of Bohemia. Others were unimpressed with the Bohemian presence in England, while a few advocates of English Bible translation looked to Anne for evidence of uncontroversial engagement with vernacular Scripture. Later commentators would turn to this particular deployment of the Bohemians in attempts to link John Wyclif with Jan Hus—and regardless of Anne, the Wycliffite-Hussite relationship was influential. Panelists in this session are asked to consider the place and meaning of Bohemia and its representatives in English literary, cultural, and/or material networks in the later medieval period.

37. Mediating Italian Literature 
Organizer: Kara Gaston (kara.gaston@utoronto.ca)
Roundtable
Under what circumstances did English readers encounter Italian texts? What can be learned from studying these encounters? This panel aims to consider the material, linguistic, hermeneutic, aesthetic, and/or intellectual contexts that mediated Italian texts for English readers. How do such contexts affect the way that Italian literature was read, interpreted, and rewritten by English poets? Papers focused on the role of French and/or Occitan in these exchanges would be particularly welcome, as would be papers interested in closely analyzing or theorizing mediated encounters between texts.   

38. Narrative Conduits 
Organizers: Kristi Castleberry (kristi.castleberry@gmail.com) and Leila K. Norako (lknorako@gmail.com)
Roundtable
From the watery borders of the Celtic Otherworld, to the vibrant matrices of transmission in the Mediterranean, to the Thames as meeting point of king and poet in John Gower’s Confessio Amantis, rivers and other bodies of water commonly serve as thresholds, starting points, narrative conduits. The wide-ranging sources we find in Chaucer’s work show us that narratives and texts (and even poets) made their way back and forth across the English Channel. This session welcomes papers that explore how navigable bodies of water like the Thames are represented in medieval literature and how they function as transmitters of narratives themselves. 

THREAD 6: RITUAL, PAGEANT, SPECTACLE
Organizers: Tamara Atkin (t.atkin@qmul.ac.uk) and Emily Steiner (steinere@sas.upenn.edu)

39. Material Culture and Early British Performance
Organizer: Gail McMurray Gibson (gagibson@davidson.edu)
Roundtable
This round table discussion invites presenters interested in exploring new possibilities for thinking about the physicality of pre-Reformation performance, theater, and spectacle—as well as current scholarly and theoretical issues involving surviving drama manuscripts and early printed texts as objects. What is the distinction, for example, between devotional images and stage props? If relics differ from other kinds of material objects because of their function as conduits of spiritual power, could staged memorial representations of sacred objects in religious drama, nonetheless, function in similar ways? How, if at all, did the Reformation divide affect the materiality of stage performance? What kinds of agency did the manuscripts and early printed texts of theater themselves possess? If these manuscripts and early books had significant post-medieval cultural histories, how might going beyond our usual scholarly bias of origin illuminate our understanding of pre-Reformation drama? 
         
40. Texts in Plays/Plays as Texts
Organizer: Tamara Atkin (t.atkin@qmul.ac.uk)
Paper panel
This session invites papers that explore the textuality of medieval drama. Thanks to the Records of Early English Drama project our knowledge and understanding of the performance history of early English drama is greatly enhanced. But the effort to reconstruct original auspices necessarily relies on evidence that is wholly textual. Turning to the material history of dramatic manuscripts and early printed playbooks, this session welcomes papers that examine the textual histories of medieval drama and consider the literary status of drama alongside other related genres. At the same time, texts and books abound both as dramatic subjects and also as objects tobe read in a wide range of medieval plays. What roles do texts and books play in medieval English theatre?

41. Public Interiorities
Organizer: Katherine Zieman (katherine.zieman@ell.ox.ac.uk)
Paper panel
Based on David Lawton’s generative concept of “public interiorities,” this panel seeks papers concerned with lyric, drama, liturgy, psalmody, devotional writing, devotional practice, or narrative voice as culturally significant performances of interiority. Whether in the realms of “courtly love” or religious devotion, these interiorities are constituted by performance before a public, as “personal but inhabited areas [that] already exist as text before they are inhabited, often in a shared first-person, by a particular speaker or group”  (Lawton). What kinds of interiorities are constituted by such performances and to what ends? Similarly, what kinds of publics are articulated through these performances?    

42. Performing Gendered Spaces
Organizer: Emma Lipton, University of Missouri (liptone@missouri.edu)
Paper panel
At least since Judith Butler’s Gender Trouble (1990), much work has been devoted to gender as a performance. Similarly, recent theory by Edward Soja and others has highlighted the performative nature of space by arguing that space is both material and subjective. Drawing on these ideas in her discussion of medieval theater, Donalee Dox has urged us to consider space as “an active participant in performance” that is “fluid, active, saturated with meanings, and always constructing, deconstructing and reconstructing an imagined reality.” This panel aims to consider the interaction between gendered and spatial models of performance. Possible topics include (but are not limited to) the gendered staging of medieval drama, rituals of king or queenship, the gendered performance of sanctity, the production of domestic space or the role of gender in spatial memory.

43. Emotions at Law
Organizers: Andreea Boboc (aboboc@pacific.edu) and Conrad van Dyk (conrad.vandyk@concordia.ab.ca).
Roundtable
The rehabilitation of emotions as judgments of value by Martha Nussbaum in her books, Upheavals of Thoughts and Hiding from Humanity, has injected new pith into modern ethical and legal discourses. No longer are emotions seen as “unthinking energies that simply push the person around, without being hooked up to the ways in which she perceives or thinks about the world” (Upheavals 24-5). This panel invites papers that explore the relevance of emotions to legal and other medieval texts (late medieval literature, chronicles, etc.) that concern themselves with the law. Panelists might wish to ponder questions such as: How were medieval emotions conceptualized at law? How are emotions performed at law and/or in legally inspired texts and contexts? How did emotions influence the practice of justice or medieval understandings of fairness and legitimacy? How do emotions participate in the constructions of citizenship, legal identity, sovereignty, and criminality? 

44. Spectacular Things
Organizer: Robert S. Sturges, Arizona State University (Robert.Sturges@asu.edu)
Paper panel
Theater history and theories of things (object-oriented ontologies, Actor-Network-Theory, etc.) may find common ground in the investigation of the roles things play in medieval theatricality. This session therefore invites papers on the status and role(s) of non-human objects in medieval drama, ritual, and spectacle. Topics might include the use of costumes, props, etc.; the representation of objects’ agency; miraculous objects, relics, etc.; ritual objects; weapons; books considered as objects; the built environment; bodies considered as objects; and so on. Approaches that suggest links between theater history and contemporary theoretical research on the status of objects are especially welcome.

45. Teaching Drama After Chaucer
Organizer: Theresa Coletti (tcoletti@umd.edu)
Seminar 
In a chronological sense, virtually the entire, recognized textual corpus of medieval English drama is drama “after” Chaucer.  But Chaucer also inhabited a world punctuated by ritual, pageantry, and spectacle. This seminar invites contributors who want to share recent – or speculate about future – opportunities for teaching drama and cultural performances “after” Chaucer in these and other frameworks. ,For example, how can Chaucer’s works inform the teaching of Middle English dramatic texts?  What can hybrid performative modes, such as those of Chaucerian admirer John Lydgate, offer to medieval dramatic pedagogy? Each contributor will make a brief presentation focused on bringing a particular dramatic work of his/her choice to the classroom; contributors will agree to prepare for the seminar by reading all the primary materials selected by individual participants. 

46. Teaching with Torture: Violence as Spectacle in the Classroom
Organizer: Nicole Nyffenegger (nyffenegger@ens.unibe.ch)
Roundtable
In a classroom reading of medieval saints’ lives against Elaine Scarry’s Body in Pain and the Abu Ghraib scandal, the role of the spectator is a pertinent question. From the public spectacle of martyrdom to the dehumanising pictures taken by GIs – who is the one who looks on and why? What is their role in the theatre of violence and how does it intertwine with our own engagement with the text? Panellists are asked to consider the ways in which literary representations of torture, war, rape, and murder can productively be used in teaching, in ways that steer clear of sensationalism while making medieval studies relevant to students.

THREAD 7:  CORPOREALITIES 
Organizers: Jonathan Hsy (jhsy@gwu.edu) and Katie Walter (K.L.Walter@sussex.ac.uk)

47. Are We Postcolonial Yet? Pale Faces 2016 
Organizer: Jeffrey Jerome Cohen (jjcohen@gwu.edu)
Paper panel
This session will ponder the ways in which literary medieval studies has both changed and resisted some profound challenges to its self-identity over the past decade and a half. Returning to the theme of Carolyn Dinshaw's 2000 Biennial Lecture in London ("Pale Faces: Race, Religion and Affect in Chaucer's Texts and Their Readers"), presenters will wonder about diversity among medievalists, the place of the personal, the matter of race, and the decolonization of medieval studies as a discipline. Sixteen years after Dinshaw's lecture, in the wake of important work by scholars like Ingham, Heng, Warren and Davis (among many others), we will ask if we are postcolonial yet, and wonder why we remain so pale.

48. Corporeal Fluidity: Written in Stone 
Organizer: Elizabeth Herbert McAvoy (e.mcavoy@swansea.ac.uk)
Paper Panel
This session examines how the body enclosed by stone is (re)shaped, organized and managed within the Middle Ages. In particular, it interrogates how a gender-inflected body-in-the-world becomes transformed by synecdochal relationship with the (apparently genderless) stone walls that surround it – those of house, garden, cloister, anchorhold or grave. To what extent, too, are those stone walls impacted upon by the gendered corporeality – along with those erections, excretions, accretions and excesses – they contain? With Gothic architecture’s miraculous animation of intractable stone as embodied simulacra of the living and the dead, this session ultimately aims to examine the permeable boundaries of apparently stone-bound identities.

49.  (Dis)abling the Human/Animal Body
Organizers: Liam Lewis (l.g.lewis@warwick.ac.uk) and Haylie Swenson (haylie@gwmail.gwu.edu)
Seminar
This session will consider the potentially (dis)abling effects of human/animal relationships through an exploration of how notions of disability, animality, and humanness co-participate in the construction of medieval identities. In conversations before and during the conference, we will ask not only how tropes of animality are used to figure disability, but whether or not the reverse is true, as well: are notions of disability used to reinforce divides between humans and animals in the period? Can those relationships/categories be enabling? Furthermore, we will consider the effects of the imposition of those categories on bodies and communities, as well as the challenges and potential pitfalls of considering disability and animal theory both together and in conversation with medieval texts. In order to enhance the on-site conversation, participants will each pre-circulate a short primary document or critical essay for discussion in advance of the seminar.

50. Divergent Bodies and the Making of the Middle Ages
Organizers: Rick Godden (rick.godden@gmail.com) and Dorothy Kim (dokim@vassar.edu) 
Paper panel
This session explores the presence of divergent bodies in its most expansive definitions--including both physical and cognitive impairment, as well as different sexualities, and racial identities – and how they matter for the construction of the Middle Ages. Presenters would attend to how divergent bodies--their presence or their erasure – are a contested site for forming national and local identities and bodies of knowledge. For example, how does the centrality of the imagined and real divergent bodies in Mandeville’s Travels create local identities as well as a larger international one? This session will open up a larger conversation about how medieval studies have used queer, disabled, multiconfessional, racial, and other bodies to create medieval literary culture. We would also welcome papers that examine the vibrant exchange between past and present, between the divergent bodies of academic medievalists and the subjects they study.

51. Double Rainbows: Queer & Crip Understanding and Teaching
Organizers: Ben Ambler (bambler@asu.edu) and Carol Robinson (clrobins@kent.edu) 
Roundtable 
This roundtable will examine Queer and Crip pedagogies in the Chaucerian literature classroom (online or on-land). How might intersections between students and characters address issues of queer IDENTITY, (dis)ABILITY, and bodily expression of other differences (size, shape, gesture, dress, movement, acting, etc.)? Might such pedagogies inform the (in)VISIBILITY of certain corporealities? How could examining texts & cultures that precede the 17th-century invention of the ab/normal help us think, and teach, beyond contemporary constructions of straight and able bodies? Ultimately, how do the texts, media, and topics we teach function as a part of the environment that defines ability and straightness?

52. Embodied Emotions, Emotional Bodies
Organizer: Stephanie Downes (stephanie.downes@unimelb.edu.au)
Paper panel
This panel investigates corporeal forms of feeling in late medieval literature. It invites papers that consider the ways in which emotion is expressed through, visibly alters, convulses, shocks, stuns, fells, or otherwise moves the body (human or inhuman) in narrative texts. The body’s movements and appearance - its gestures, postures, and facial expressions - ask to be read as external signs of emotion, whether blushing or smiling, lying down or jumping up, fainting or falling over, shaking, writhing, yearning, or turning away. Papers are encouraged to address medieval and modern theories of affect, embodiment, and cognition to explore how the body both feels and generates feeling, as well as feelings about the body; and/or to assess the impact of disability, gender, age, race, and species, on embodied emotional display.

53. The Sensuous Body
Organizers: Richard Newhauser (richard.newhauser@asu.edu) and Larry Scanlon (lfscanlon@aol.com)
Roundtable
The human body can be the site of ethical ambiguity, the external senses the starting point in the cognitive process or part of the temptation of sensuality, the bodily form an occasion for the discussion of aesthetics. This session aims to pull together short presentations on corporeal sins and corporeal virtues, on sensory studies in various configurations, and on physicality as it relates especially to beauty. Presenters may wish to speak to historical issues in the representation of the body, ethical matters connected with the value of sensuality, issues in sensory studies such as the relation between sensory perception and cognition, or the place of sensuality in the understanding of aesthetics.

THREAD 8: LITERARY FORMS
Organizers: Arthur Bahr (awbahr@mit.edu) and Anke Bernau (anke.bernau@manchester.ac.uk)

54. Lyrics Inscribed
Organizer: Julia Boffey (j.boffey@qmul.ac.uk)
Roundtable/ Poster session
Medieval lyrics took material form in many non-manuscript contexts: inscribed on tablets and boards, for example, or painted on walls, incised in stone and metal, or woven into tapestries. Reading lyrics in these contexts seems likely to have produced aesthetic, sensory, even socio-cultural effects very different from those gained through reading them in books. This session offers presenters the opportunity to present their work briefly for discussion during the roundtable and then to display this research in the poster session. Contributions should illustrate how presenting research on these lyrics through the medium of a poster session offers an unusual opportunity to explore and enact their original functions.

55. Chaucerian Debate and Dialogue
Organizer: Neil Cartlidge (n.m.r.cartlidge@durham.ac.uk)
Seminar 
Works that formally constitute themselves as “debates” or “dialogues” are numerous in medieval literature: but in what ways do Chaucer’s writings align themselves with literary traditions of formal debate? How important are oppositional structures to the forms in which Chaucer conceived his work? And to what extent does Chaucer write in such a way as to encourage or provoke multiple or contradictory responses? Contributions to this session will offer new illustrations of some of the ways in which Chaucer might be said to have engaged with traditions of debate and dialogue in medieval culture and/or offer new perspectives on the significance of formal opposition for an understanding of Chaucer’s art more generally.

56. Sweetness: The Possibilities of Pleasure
Organizers: Peggy Knapp (pk07@andrew.cmu.edu), Richard Newhauser (Richard.Newhauser@asu.edu), and Jessica Rosenfeld (jrosenfe@artsci.wustl.edu)
Paper panel
Pleasure is a term often invoked and less often analyzed when we talk about reading, though Chaucer makes us think about pleasure more critically. Pleasure might refer to various aspects of reading: pleasure in poetic form and language, the pleasure of understanding, reading as a pleasurable sensory experience, the pleasure of the manuscript page, or of mimesis.  Acknowledging the equivocation between taste as sense experience and taste as the judgment of value, we encourage submissions to this session that deal with sensory studies, the aesthetics of beauty (in particular, textual beauty), pleasure as a nexus of ethics and aesthetics, and combined or related issues. 

57. Literary Value in 2016
Organizer: Robert Meyer-Lee (rmeyerle@iusb.edu)
Roundtable
On the defensive within institutional environments increasingly hostile to the humanities, and confronted by the task to account for what we do in the blunt, quantifying discourse of assessment, we who study and teach medieval literature are being called upon to articulate the value of our discipline, which in turn often also means articulating the value of our objects of study.  The past two decades have witnessed various returns to the category of the literary that in effect seek to recover a discipline of specifically literary study but one which takes into account the theoretical, ideological, and historical critiques of the discipline’s earlier self-scrutiny.  This roundtable session seeks to address ongoing difficulties in this return to the category of the literary, and in particular in the attempt to offer a general account of literary value; ways of overcoming these difficulties; and/or diagnoses of the critical and institutional predicaments in which we find ourselves.

58. The Limits of the Literary
Organizers: James Simpson (jsimpson@fas.harvard.edu), Jonathan Stavsky (jonathan.stavsky@mail.huji.ac.il)‎, Tom Stillinger (tomstillinger@gmail.com), and Eva von Contzen (eva.voncontzen@rub.de)
Paper panel
Since Middle English lacked the term "literature" in anything like its present meanings, there is room to wonder if the quality we call "literariness" had any independent value in the Age of Chaucer. Instead, late-medieval literariness often emerges in demarcation from and tension with its antithesis: forms and discourses that foreground the limitations of imaginative writing. We invite papers that explore the ways in which the non-literary, partly literary, and anti-literary serve as productive sites for developing a literary poetics.

59. Meters and Stanza-Forms: The Favorite and the Forgotten
Organizers: Jenni Nuttall (jennifer.nuttall@seh.ox.ac.uk) and Eric Weiskott (eric.weiskott@bc.edu)
Seminar
The 14th- and 15th centuries witnessed a proliferation of metrical forms and great experimentation with stanza-forms in English. Study of these holds out the promise of charting new lines of formal affiliation and alternate literary histories of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. This seminar will investigate, through individual case studies, what it is to write and read metrically and stanzaically. As Mark Lambert writes: “the maker of stanzaic narrative is […] conspicuously committed […] to finding a certain shape of experience again and again.” This session will offer a space in which to compare the shapes of experience made by Middle English meters and stanza-forms both familiar and rare. Participants will be asked to focus on one meter and/or stanza-form and precirculate a short, representative passage.

60. Intent and the Haphazard in Medieval Books
Organizers: Zachary Hines (zhines@utexas.edu), Boyda Johnstone (bjohnstone1@fordham.edu), and Yelizaveta Strakhov (yelizaveta.strakhov@northwestern.edu)
Paper panel    
While certain late medieval compilations demonstrate overarching organizational frameworks, others seem unplanned, and sometimes even haphazard. How do we as scholars respond to such varying levels of discernible intent? This panel considers intent and the haphazard as dual axes by which we might better understand the material books of the Middle Ages. How, in other words, does the material life of a manuscript contribute to its meaning? It seeks papers that explore the miscellaneous, the polysemous, and the mysterious as well as those concerned with manuscripts that betray what Seth Lerer has termed “the anthologistic impulse.” 

THREAD 9: THE USES OF THE MEDIEVAL
Organizers: Kathleen Davis (kathleendavis.uri@gmail.com) and Hannah Johnson (hrjohn@gmail.com) 

61. Chaucerian Shibboleths I
Organizers: Michelle Karnes (karnes@stanford.edu) and Ryan McDermott (rjm95@pitt.edu) 
Roundtable

62. Chaucerian Shibboleths II
Organizers: Michelle Karnes (karnes@stanford.edu) and Ryan McDermott (rjm95@pitt.edu) 
Roundtable
Chaucerian shibboleths are key words that function as critical terms, channeling thought away from areas previously established as—to use a shibboleth—foreclosing. As a discipline, English studies tends to move forward by loosely organizing collective energy around emergent concepts, frameworks, and ethical concerns. Progress in research rarely incorporates outmoded concepts, using them instead as fulcrums against which to leverage reconfigurations of the field. The outmoded concepts, frameworks, and ethical concerns are then reduced to shibboleths, terms that oppositionally index entire histories of the field’s development in order to get on with the present push toward the future. 

These two roundtable sessions invite proposals that consider a single shibboleth or set of related shibboleths, whether of the age of Chaucer or operating more widely in literature and humanities fields. We especially encourage formats that foster intergenerational dialogue, including interviews between at least two generations of scholars. Some possible shibboleths are: Totality, Teleology, Quiet hierarchies, Age of Faith, Presentism, anachronism, Antiquarianism, Unity, Simplicity, Formalism, New Criticism. 

63. Chaucerian Controversialisms I
Organizers: Ana Sáez-Hidalgo (ana.saez@fyl.uva.es), Nancy Warren (nwarren@tamu.edu), and R.F. Yeager (rfyeager@hotmail.com)
Paper panel

64. Chaucerian Controversialisms II
Organizers: Ana Sáez-Hidalgo (ana.saez@fyl.uva.es), Nancy Warren (nwarren@tamu.edu), and R.F. Yeager (rfyeager@hotmail.com)
Roundtable
For 250 years after Henry VIII declared an independent English Church, bitter controversialist struggle divided Anglicans, dissenting Protestants of various sorts (Presbyterians, Anabaptists, and Quakers among others), and English Catholic recusants. Despite much material and textual evidence of how Chaucer’s and other major writers’ biographies and works were utilized during the 16th and 17th centuries on both sides of the cause—e.g., composite editions, attribution of works by others as “proof” of partisan belief, polemical literary criticism, fictionalized appearances in literary pieces—the controversialists remain little studied. 

We seek participants for two linked sessions, one of formal 20-minute papers and the other a roundtable including 10-minute presentations, and discussion by participants and audience. The proposed sessions seek to draw attention to this extraordinarily neglected area of religious controversy that, in fact, preoccupied English political and literary attention for more than two hundred years, and to function as a prolegomenon to the necessary future scholarship. Applicants should specify which, or either, session is desired. 

65. Translating Global Chaucers 
Organizer: Candace Barrington (barringtonc@ccsu.edu)
Roundtable
This roundtable will continue the Global Chaucers conversation begun at the 2014 Congress. The focus will be on translations of Chaucerian texts into languages other than standard Present Day English. Of particular interest are presentations by translators, scholars, and teachers outside the Anglophone inner circle (UK, US, Canada, Australia, NZ). Participants will consider the ways translations:
-reflect the particular linguistic, cultural, or social context in which they appeared;
-reveal understandings of Chaucer's texts unavailable to an Anglophone reader; 
-take advantage of verse or prose forms (or other stylistic conventions) available in the receiving literary culture but not in English. 

66. Medieval and Modern in the Classroom
Organizer: Katharine Breen (khbreen@northwestern.edu)
Seminar
This seminar is dedicated to pedagogically productive juxtapositions of the medieval and the modern (or, if you prefer, the post-modern). Have you invited your students to consider Kafka’s “A Hunger Artist” in terms of the generic conventions of the medieval saint’s life? Or asked them to analyze the medievalism of Game of Thrones? More broadly, seminar participants might consider the ways medieval texts help to denaturalize modern conventions or, conversely, the ways modern analogues render medieval texts less alienating. How does “the medieval” function as a category in contemporary discourse – and how do specifically medieval cultural formations persist, often unacknowledged, in modern works? Participants will be asked to pre-circulate a classroom assignment that asks students to set medieval and (post)modern texts in relation to each other.

67. Contemporary Medievalist Poetry
Organizer: Jane Chance (jchance@rice.edu)
Roundtable
This roundtable involves reading, discussing, and theorizing contemporary medievalistic poems to extend concepts of “medievalism”.. For example, award-winning classicist Anne Carson refashions the myth of Geryon’s relationship with Hercules in her Autobiography of Red and Red Doc>, just  as Mary Syzbist does with the medievalized figure of Mary in Incardine. What kind of situations do poets borrow in reassessing the medieval, and what benefits emerge from repurposing? This panel will hopefully offer new poet-based perspectives on the modern and postmodern vernacularity of the Middle Ages. 

Open Topic Sessions

68. Surveillance I: Watching, Listening, Counting, Listing, Mapping
Organizer: Sylvia Tomasch (stomasch@hunter.cuny.edu)
Paper panel

69. Surveillance II: Inquiring, Sorting, Classifying, Confessing, Correcting
Organizer: Sylvia Tomasch (stomasch@hunter.cuny.edu)
Paper panel
While not technologically based, surveillance in the Middle Ages was quite as ubiquitous as it is today, permeating all aspects of society.  Consider The Rule of St. Benedict, the Fourth Lateran Council, the Book of Margery Kempe, sumptuary laws, mirrors for princes, conduct literature, mappae mundi, or some of the Canterbury Tales, to note just a few instances. Participants are encouraged to use elements of contemporary Surveillance Studies to help explore the many medieval modes of the surveillant process, from watching, listening, counting, listing, and mapping to inquiring, sorting, classifying, confessing, and correcting – and other possibilities not noted here.  

70. Varieties of Literacy in Medieval England
Organizers: Christopher Cannon (christopher.cannon@nyu.edu) and Emily Steiner (steinere@sas.upenn.edu)
Paper panel
Paper proposals are invited on the relationship—and changing relationship—between orality and literacy; the variety of schools and schooling; the role of mutlilingualism (or multilingualisms) as well as dialects in elementary and more advanced pedagogy; the importance of French over against Latin over against English in any textual community; the relationship between word and image (visual literacy versus textual literacy); songs and singing as modes of literacy training; and the meaning-making roles of marginalia and commentary (what might be called glossamatic literacy).

71. Did Chaucer (or Langland or Gower) have a mother tongue?
Organizers: Christopher Cannon (christopher.cannon@nyu.edu) and Emily Steiner (steinere@sas.upenn.edu)
Roundtable
We invite short position papers addressing the question, “Did Chaucer (or Langland or Gower) have a mother tongue?” Participants are welcome to answer this question using a range of texts and approaches; all participants should be prepared to engage in lively debate.

72. Middle English Literature and the Archives I: London
Organizers: Julia Boffey (j.boffey@qmul.ac.uk) and Ryan Perry (R.Perry@kent.ac.uk)
Paper panel

73. Middle English literature and the Archives II: The Continent
Organizers: Julia Boffey (j.boffey@qmul.ac.uk) and Ryan Perry (R.Perry@kent.ac.uk)
Paper panel
Recent scholarship has begun to make clear how much material of relevance to Chaucer, and to Middle English literature more generally, resides in archival collections beyond the holdings of literary manuscripts in major research libraries.  In such archives, often of administrative, financial or ecclesiastical records are new texts, new records about the activities of authors, scribes and readers, illuminating examples of organizing and recording information, and other fresh insights into Chaucer and his age. We invite proposals for two sessions in this thread: 1) London archives 2) continental archives.

74. Conscience and Confession
Organizer: Nicole D. Smith (ndsmith@unt.edu)
Paper panel
This panel invites papers examining medieval theories of confession and the role of conscience therein. While conscience as “knowledge of the self” (sapientia) is perhaps nowhere more apparent than in penitential works, allegories, hagiographies, and romances also advance models of self-consciousness based on explicit, rational cognition of sin and implicit, affect-laden experience of contrition. Papers may consider the implications of integrating cognitive processes with states of heart-felt sorrow; whether genre or the vernacular affects conscience as a typology for scripting forgiveness; or how codicological contexts may enrich our understanding of the enduring questions of truth, love, and mercy.

75. Digital Approaches to Middle English Editing 
Organizers: Akiyuki Jimura (ajimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp) and Yoshiyuki Nakao (ynakao@hiroshima-u.ac.jp)
Roundtable
This roundtable is designed to bring together recent work on digital editing projects and to assess what they collectively contribute to our knowledge of Middle English literature. Panelists can discuss particular software tools (either completed or in development) that contribute to the textual criticism of Chaucer and other medieval authors. These short position papers are also encouraged to address the questions: what do digital tools add to our understanding of medieval texts? What are their limitations? What other tools might we consider creating? 

76. Traveler’s Tales and Medieval Ethnographies: Encountering Religious Diversities
Organizer: Christine Chism (chism@ucla.edu)
Paper panel
This session investigates the ways that historical or fictional medieval travelers describe the practices of other confessions, sometimes to exoticize them, and sometimes to compare them with and defamiliarize their own. Proposals are welcomed that analyze inter- and intra-confessional worlding, ethnographic tropes and their relation to narrative forms, and the ways that narrators perform themselves and construct their audiences at the boundaries of faiths.

77. Anchoritic Spirituality
Organizer: Susannah Chewning (chewning@ucc.edu), Elizabeth Herbert McAvoy (e.mcavoy@swansea.ac.uk), and Michelle Sauer (michelle.m.sauer@email.und.edu)
Roundtable
Can we speak of “the physical” when talking about the anchoritic life? This roundtable seeks 10-minute responses to this question that specifically address the physical and material experiences of the anchorite, with particular attention to the locations of anchoritic enclosure in England. Participants might consider an identifiable anchorite and his/her cell; the mystical tradition & enclosure; a tradition of enclosure at a precise location; the relationship between a location and a literary tradition; people or places associated with the anchoritic; remnants of anchoritism in England today; material culture and the body of the medieval English anchorite. Special attention will be given to the greater London area.

78. Sensing Nature
Organizers: Justin Barker (barker18@purdue.edu) and Ingrid Pierce (pierce44@purdue.edu) 
Paper panel
This panel invites consideration of how medieval literary works theorize the communication between nature and the senses and illuminate central human and artistic questions—for instance, how we come to know our world and how sensory experience of the natural world influences the poetic process. Panelists may explore how late medieval poets generate an implicit theory of the senses through a range of topics, including the music of the spheres, the relationship between the elements and the senses, the way sense perception promotes interconnection between humankind and nature, the tension between nature and artifice, and sensing nature in dream visions. 

79. Chaucer’s Langland
Organzers: Stephanie Batkie (sbatkie@montevallo.edu) and Eric Weiskott (eric.weiskott@bc.edu)
Roundtable
Many scholars have discerned evidence of the influence of Piers Plowman on Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. What is the literary-historical significance of this “obligatory conjunction” between two major Middle English poems? This session seeks to enrich the current critical discussion about the cultural and literary resonance of Langland’s alliterative poem for Chaucer and his audience. Possible topics for short position papers include Chaucer’s perceptions of the alliterative meter; the nature of Chaucer’s access to manuscripts of Piers Plowman; Chaucer and Langland as London poets; Piers Plowman as a pre-Ricardian poem; and the overlapping literary genres of the two poetic projects, especially dialogue and estates satire.

80. The Social Worlds in Troilus and Criseyde 
Co-organizers: Lawrence Besserman (lawrencebesserman@gmail.com) and John M. Hill (jdomars@aol.com)
Paper panel
The co-organizers invite paper proposals focusing on differentiations among the social, intellectual, and theological speech registers of Troilus, Criseyde, Pandarus, and the Narrator. How has Chaucer differentiated among these characters through their use of oaths, invoked relationships (such as friendship and courtship), asseverations, vows, maxims, preferred syntactic patterns, etc.? Proposals examining the social worlds revealed in the speech of minor characters (e.g. Cassandra, Diomede, Hector) are also welcome.

81. New Literary Histories of the English Language
Organizer: Seeta Chaganti (schaganti@ucdavis.edu)
Paper Panel
How might a fresh look at the field known as History of the English language (HEL) generate new and unexpected arguments about medieval literature and the value of literary and humanist study? Papers could revivify the relationship between medieval texts and HEL through new formalism, new and post-historicism, media studies, digital humanities, temporality studies, aesthetics, medievalism, anthropocene and posthumanist studies, or other methodologies. Such approaches might be brought to bear on histories of formal features; coinage, onomastics, etymology, or global borrowing as literary effects; or the medieval text’s self-conscious exploration of language change. 

82. Chaucer in the College Classroom
Organizers: Disa Gambera (d.gambera@utah.edu) and Peter Travis (Peter.W.Travis@dartmouth.edu) 
Roundtable
In the wake of the recent publication of Approaches to Teaching Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Second Edition (2014), a session focusing on present-day college classroom experiments in Chaucer pedagogy is surely called for. And in this era of declining enrollments for many English Departments, perhaps it is also the right time to consider what Chaucer has to offer 21st -century students, particularly those not planning to get advanced degrees in English. By sharing information about how Chaucer and other medieval authors are and might be taught, this panel will lead into a practical discussion concerning the broader merits of teaching Chaucer as well as various ways of “marketing” all things medieval in the college curriculum.

83. Fifty Years of the Chaucer Review
Organizers: David Raybin (draybin@eiu.edu) and Susanna Fein (sfein@kent.edu)
Paper panel 
This panel celebrates the fiftieth anniversary of The Chaucer Review: A Journal of Medieval Studies and Literary Criticism. For our jubilee session, we seek papers that look back, taking stock of how our discipline has evolved since a time when the principal players were all male and the main issues involved New Criticism and patristics. More importantly, we seek papers that look forward, suggesting the goals and directions speakers envision for scholarship and the profession in the next decade and beyond.

84. What If It’s True? -- Chaucer’s Tale: 1386 and the Road to Canterbury  
Organizer: Lynn Staley (lstaley@colgate.edu)
Roundtable
In his recent book, Paul Strohm offers a narrative that uses the facts we already have about Chaucer’s life in relation to his own reading of London city politics in the last quarter of the 14th century and study of the material world and culture of the city itself. This roundtable will address the scholarly implications of the book. What does it add to or take away from our scholarly understanding of Chaucer the writer? What are its implications for our understanding of Chaucer’s works?

85. Materiality and Materialism
Organizers: Katherine Little (Katherine.C.Little@colorado.edu) and Nicholas Perkins (nicholas.perkins@st-hughs.ox.ac.uk)
Paper panel
This session takes up the relationship between recent theories of materiality, or the “material turn,” and what we once called “materialism”: the relationship between literary texts (or art) and economics/social relations.  We ask, if the lively biographies of things are now center stage, and if networks and connectivity have replaced institutions, economies, and social structures in our critical approaches, what do we do with “materialism,” as the material fact of humans laboring for their livelihood?  We welcome papers on how medieval texts theorize materiality or pay close attention to the material, as well as papers on the distance between cultural materialism and current instantiations of materiality studies.

86. Arts of Dying
Organizer: Amy Appleford (applefor@bu.edu)
Paper panel
It continues to be a truism that, after the Black Death, death became a focus of special imaginative intensity throughout European culture. Figured by the skeletons that occupy the lower compartments of transi tombs or link bony hands in the Danse macabre, death functions as a potent symbol of the period’s difference from the modern. But imaginations of death are hardly confined to the late Middle Ages. They are a preoccupation in insular literature from the Anglo-Saxon period onward. This session invites papers that explore death and/or dying as theme, practice, personal or community preoccupation, religious or philosophical idea.

Poster Groupings
Organizers: Ruth Evans (revans19@slu.edu) and Laura Saetveit Miles (laura.miles@gmail.com)

Can your research be presented visually? Would you like your audience to contemplate your evidence at leisure and give you one-on-one feedback on your analysis? This year's NCS Poster Session will offer a venue for participants to showcase work-in-progress throughout the duration of the conference, as well as actively present in person during a dedicated session time in the program. 

While the posters will be displayed all together in a prominent public area, they will each "belong" to one of the main threads governing the conference, and be clustered according to these threads - thus building on the connections made during other sessions. During the poster session time itself, participants will individually discuss their poster with viewers.

This is an excellent opportunity to think about your work-in-progress in new ways and consider how non-linear visual presentation - i.e. not a paper, not an article - can reinvigorate your own understanding and enable others to engage with your work at their own pace. The scholarship best suited to the poster format will usually perform analysis of images or objects, or it will graphically present information in a way that enables the poster to do different work than a paper. Proposals should include a description of the research, how it lends itself to a poster format, and some speculation on how the poster will look. The proposal should be affiliated with one of the threaded poster sessions below. Accepted poster contributors will receive advice and support on poster production.

NB: NCS tried out a poster session for the first time in 2014, and the membership deemed it a great success. Posters usually include narrative, illustrations, tables, graphs, and similar presentation formats. The poster should concisely communicate the essence of the presenter’s research and/or showcase a particular artefact and the researcher's findings. Colorado State University has published useful general information on poster sessions, which can be accessed here: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/guide.cfm?guideid=78.
Some handsome example posters are available by following this link: http://www.lifeandliterature.org/p/poster-session.html

87. Poster Group 1. London: Books, Texts, Lives

88. Poster Group 2. Error

89. Poster Group 3. Medieval Media

90. Poster Group 4. Scientiae 

91. Poster Group 5. Chaucerian Networks

92. Poster Group 6. Ritual, Pageant, Spectacle

93. Poster Group 7. Corporealities

94. Poster Group 8. Literary Form

95. Poster Group 9. The Uses of the Medieval

Accommodation at the London Congress

Desiring Chaucer

2016 Congress Update

New Mentoring Initiative

Why Chaucer Now?

Vol. 37, No. 1 - Spring 2015

Volume 37 (2015)

NCS 2016 and High School Teachers—Call for Papers—Extended Deadline

Exhuming the Giant

Curious Times

NCS 2016 and High School Teachers

2016 Congress Call for Papers

2018 Call Guidelines

2018 Call Intro

River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester seeks Director

Volume 36 (2014)

Schedule: Friday 15 July

Coach Trip to Canterbury

NCS will provide coach transport to Canterbury, allowing delegates to visit the charming medieval city and its stunning cathedral. Coaches will leave Queen Mary in the morning and will leave delegates near to the historic city centre; coaches will return to London in the late afternoon/early evening, and will aim to have delegates back in London by about 7pm.

We understand that some delegates may also wish to travel independently and take the (faster, but more expensive) train from London Stratford to Canterbury. We will provide an itinerary of Canterbury's many historical sites to all Congress delegates. 

Please note that tickets for this trip are available only to registered delegates at the New Chaucer Society Congress 2016.

Book your ticket here.

Schedule: Thursday 14 July

9:00-10:30    SESSIONS: GROUP 8

8A Roundtable: Teaching Chaucerian Cruxes
(Bancroft 1.13)
Thread: Error
Organizer: John Longo, The Colorado Springs School
Chair: John Longo

  1. Rosemary O’Neill, Kenyon College, “Beyond the ‘Marriage Group’”
  2. Mark Sherman, Rhode Island School of Design, “Bequeathing Error by Design”
  3. Mary Kay Waterman, The Lovett School, “‘A Continuous Thread of Revelation’: The Value of Juxtaposition”
  4. Suzanne Hagedorn, College of William and Mary, “Material Girls: Teaching the Wife of Bath's Prologue and Tale and the Shipman's Tale”


8B Paper Panel: How They Thought Then
(PP1)
Thread: Medieval Media 
Organizer: Katherine Zieman, University of Oxford, and Sarah Noonan, St. Mary’s College
Chair: Sarah Noonan 

  1. Nancy Bradbury, Smith College, “The Medium is the Medicine: Middle English Healing Charms”
  2. J. D. Sargan, University of Oxford, “Crosses in the Margins: Gestural Mark-Making and User Engagement in the Medieval Codex”
  3. Daniel Wakelin, University of Oxford, “In Plain Text: Reading Boring Manuscripts”


8C Roundtable: Household Knowledges (2)
(David Sizer LT)
Thread: Scientiae
Organizer: Glenn Burger, Queens College and The Graduate Center, CUNY
Chair: Glenn Burger

  1. Jennifer Sapio, University of Texas, “MS Harley 2253: What Women Read at Home”
  2. Raluca Radulescu, Bangor University, “Cambridge University Library Ff. 2.38”
  3. Rory Critten, University of Berne/University of Fribourg, “Household Books and Ethics”
  4. Myra Seaman, College of Charleston, “Knowing Things”
  5. Elliot Kendall, University of Exeter, “The Worshipful Eel: Object and Network in Caxton’s Book of the Knight of the Tower

 

8D Roundtable: Mediating Italian Literature
(PP2)
Thread: Chaucerian Networks
Organizer: Kara Gaston, University of Toronto 
Chair: Leah Schwebel, Texas State University

  1. Marilynn Desmond, Binghamton University-SUNY, “Boccaccio’s Filostrato and the Histoire ancienne jusqu’à César (second redaction): The Matter of Troy in Naples and London”
  2. Taylor Cowdery, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, “‘Laurence’ and ‘Bochas’ in Lydgate's Fall of Princes
  3. William Robins, Victoria University-University of Toronto, "The Decameron Effect" 
  4. Anna Wilson, University of Toronto, "The Problem of Friendship: Theorizing Affective Reception in Chaucer"
     

8E Conversation: A Pilgrimage to Safe(r) Spaces: Classroom Crossroads of Identity
(Bancroft 1.13a)
Thread: Corporealities
Organizer: Ben Ambler, Arizona State University, and Carol L. Robinson, Kent State University
Chair: Helen Young, University of Sydney

An informal discussion on building safe(r) spaces in our medieval classrooms.

 

8F Seminar: Chaucerian Debate and Dialogue
(Bancroft 1.15)
Thread: Literary Forms
Organizer: Neil Cartlidge, Durham University
Chair: Neil Cartlidge

  1. Gabriel Ford, Davidson College, “What if Chaucer Knew Disciplina Clericalis?”
  2. Jonathan Forbes, University of California-Santa Barbara, “Fragments of Debate: Group Experience in the Headlinks of the Canterbury Tales
  3. Wendy Matlock, Kansas State University, “Chaucer’s Messy Nests: Constructing Gendered Debate in the Canterbury Tales
  4. Jonathan Fruoco, Université Grenoble Alpes / ILCEA 4, “Polyphony in the Canterbury Tales: Chaucer, Debate and Polemic”
  5. Megan E. Palmer, University of California-Santa Barbara, “‘Fro this noyse unbynde’: The Victory of Suspense in Poetic Debates”

​Pre-circulated materials for this seminar can be found at http://newchaucersociety.org/hub/entry/8f-chaucerian-debate-and-dialogue


8G Paper Panel: Arts of Dying (1) 
(Bancroft 3.26)
Organizer: Amy Appleford, Boston University 
Chair: Amy Appleford

  1. Roger A. Ladd, University of North Carolina at Pembroke, “Death is Money: Buying Trouble with the Pardoner”
  2. Emma Lipton, University of Missouri, “The Trial as History: York’s 'Last Judgment'”
  3. David K. Coley, Simon Fraser University, “Patience, Plague Flight, and the Art of Not Dying”


8H Roundtable: What Do We Want Out of Book Reviews (and Book Reviewers)?
(Skeel Lecture Theatre)
Organizer and chair: Kellie Robertson, University of Maryland

This session will offer an informal conversation about issues surrounding book reviewing in Medieval Studies. What sorts of best practices should govern the book review process? How are reviews assigned? What is the impact of the review process? What role do book reviews play as the role of the scholarly monograph itself changes? Participants will include A. S. G. Edwards (Year's Work in English Studies), Patricia Clare Ingham (TMR), Robert J. Meyer-Lee (JEGP), Timothy Stinson (Digital Philology), and Marion Turner (Speculum).


8I Roundtable: What if it’s true?: Paul Strohm’s New Chaucer Biography
(Arts 2 Lecture Theatre)
Organizer: Lynn Staley, Colgate University
Chair: Lynn Staley

  1. Karma Lochrie, Indiana University, “Chaucer's Audience”
  2. R. D. Perry, University of California-Berkeley, “Extensions of the Local in Chaucer's Tale
  3. David Matthews, University of Manchester, “What Can We Now Know about Chaucer That He Didn't Know about Himself?”
  4. Ethan Knapp, Ohio State University, “Chaucer in the Customs House”


10:30-11:00     Coffee Break


11:00-12:30    SESSIONS: GROUP 9

9A Paper Panel: Early Modern Readers “Correcting” Medieval Texts
(Bancroft 1.13)
Thread: Error
Organizers: Clarissa Chenovick, Fordham University, and Frederic Clark, New York University
Chair: Clarissa Chenovick

  1. Megan Cook, Colby College, “Elias Ashmole and Franciscus Junius: Two Seventeenth-Century Annotators of Chaucer”
  2. Vaughn Stewart, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, “Obliteration as Correction: Destroying the ‘Pope’ in Early English Print”
  3. Betsy Bowden, Rutgers (Emerita), “Sanity before 1700: Seventeenth-Century Precedent to Reassurance by Dryden-the-Catholic”


9B Paper Panel: The University II.0
(Bancroft 1.13a)
Thread: Scientiae
Organizers: Thomas Goodmann, University of Miami, and Thomas Prendergast, College of Wooster
Chair: Thomas Goodmann

  1. Jenny Adams, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, “Jewish Spaces, Academic Debts, and the Building of Medieval Oxford”
  2. Matt Brumit, University of Dallas, “A Medieval Look at the Modern, Corporate University”
  3. Marjorie Harrington, University of Notre Dame, "Punctuation and Public Speaking in Medieval Oxford: The Case of William Herebert's Accents”


9C Roundtable: Narrative Conduits
(Bancroft 1.15)
Thread: Chaucerian Networks
Organizer: Leila K. Norako, Stanford University, and Kristi J. Castleberry, Lyndon State College
Chair: Leila K. Norako

  1. Valerie B. Johnson, Georgia Institute of Technology, “Taking the Waters: Rivers, Oceans, and Identity in Gower and Chaucer”
  2. Sam McMillan, The Pennsylvania State University, “The Boatman’s Song: Riverside Authorship and Literary Form in Thomas Hoccleve’s Male Regle
  3. Jeremy DeAngelo, Rutgers University, “Moral Conduct and Cultural Conduits”
  4. Sharon Rhodes, University of Rochester, “Navigating New Floodwaters in Old English Verse”
  5. Randy P. Schiff, SUNY Buffalo, “Fluvial Selves: Rivers and Identity in Pearl


9D Roundtable: Emotions at Law
(PP1)
Thread: Ritual, Pageant, Spectacle
Organizers: Andreea Boboc, University of the Pacific, and Conrad van Dijk, Concordia University of Edmonton
Chair: Andreea Boboc

  1. Rebecca F. McNamara, University of California-Los Angeles, “The Emotional Language of the Law: A Case Study of Anelida and Arcite
  2. Emily Steiner, University of Pennsylvania, “Giving the Slip: Divine Justice and Emotional Life”
  3. Jessica Rosenfeld, Washington University in St. Louis, “Envy and Justice”
  4. Paul Megna, University of Western Australia, “Chaucerian Anger”
  5. Jennifer Hough, Liverpool Hope University, “‘On kneys I knelyt and mercy culd implore’: An Examination of Kneeling in Relation to Emotions Experienced at Law”


9E Roundtable: Embodied Emotions, Emotional Bodies (2)
(PP2)
Thread: Corporealities
Organizer: Stephanie Downes, University of Melbourne
Chair: Mary C. Flannery, University of Lausanne

  1. Corinne Saunders, University of Durham, “Bodies on the Mind: Chaucer and Gower”
  2. Sarah Kelen, Nebraska Wesleyan University, “Fainting or Feinting? The Rhetorical Swoon”
  3. Juliette Vuille, Lincoln College, University of Oxford, ‘“Biblotte it with thi teris ek a lite’, or, the Art of Faking It”
  4. Amanda Barton, Saint Louis University, “The Sensation of Our Own Decay: Sensing Pain in Middle English Literature”
  5. Barry Windeatt, Emmanuel College, Cambridge, “Chaucer’s Tears: ‘Outrageous Wepyng”’


9F Seminar: Contemporary Medievalist Poetry
(Skeel Lecture Theatre)
Thread: Uses of the Medieval
Organizer: Jane Chance, Rice University
Chair: Robert Stanton, Boston College

  1. Thomas Cable, University of Texas-Austin,  “Themes and Techniques from Medieval Poetry”
  2. Paul Hardwick, Leeds Trinity University, “The Uncertain Middle Ages”
  3. Sarah Kate Moore, University of Washington, “Embodiment and Medievalism in ‘V’”
  4. Mary Kate Hurley, Ohio University, “Longing for Words: The Medievalist Poetics of Marie Howe”
  5. John Fry, University of Texas-Austin,  “At the Edge of the Known: A Contemporary Poetics of the Via Negativa
  6. Jane Chance, Rice University, “Postfeminist Vernacularity”

​Pre-circulated materials for this seminar can be found at http://newchaucersociety.org/hub/entry/9f-contemporary-medievalist-poetry 


9G Roundtable: Chaucer’s Langland
(Arts 2 Lecture Theatre)
Organizer: Stephanie Batkie and Eric Weiskott
Chair: Stephanie Batkie

  1. Christopher Cannon, New York University, “The Ploughman’s Tale”
  2. Mimi Ensley, University of Notre Dame, “A Tale of Two Plowmen: The Mid 16th-Century Reception of Piers Plowman and The Plowman’s Tale
  3. Frank Grady, University of Missouri-St. Louis, “Chaucer’s Langland’s Boethius”
  4. Elizaveta Strakhov, Marquette University, “Running Wild: Beast Allegory in Chaucer and Langland”
  5. Lawrence Warner, King’s College London, “Did Chaucer Know Piers Plowman?”


9H Roundtable: The Social Worlds in Troilus and Criseyde
(David Sizer LT)
Organizers: John M. Hill, U.S. Naval Academy, and Lawrence Besserman, Hebrew University
Chair: Lawrence Besserman, Hebrew University

  1. Jill Fitzgerald, United States Naval Academy, “Elegizing Criseyde: Chaucer and Henryson's Use of Ubi Sunt”
  2. Kathryn McKinley, University of Maryland-Baltimore County, “Troilus and Criseyde Book 2: Speech, Property, and Late Medieval Widowhood”
  3. Susan Nakley, St. Joseph's College, NY, “Sliding Sovereignties: Criseyde’s Politics in Word and Deed”
  4. Anna Narinsky, Independent Scholar, “Virtual and Objective Images of the Social Worlds in Troilus and Criseyde


9I Paper Panel: Material Mysticism
(Bancroft 3.26)
Organizer: Nicholas Watson, Harvard University
Chair: Nicholas Watson

  1. Steven Rozenski, University of Rochester, “Wisdom, Who is Christ: Henry Suso and the Performance of Gender in Mystical Theater”
  2. Kerilyn Harkaway-Krieger, Indiana University, “Materiality in Language: Form and Transcendence in Julian and the Cloud-author”
  3. Jim Knowles, North Carolina State University, “Chaucer’s Fart and Julian’s Treasure”


12:30-1:30    Lunch


1:30-3:00   SESSIONS: GROUP 10

10A Roundtable: The Legend of Good Women: Chaucer’s Mistake? (1)
(Bancroft 1.13)
Thread: Error
Organizers: Betsy McCormick, Mount San Antonio College, Leah Schwebel, Texas State University, and Lynn Shutters, Colorado State University
Chair: Betsy McCormick

  1. Glenn Burger, Queens College and The Graduate Center, CUNY, “Ugly Feelings, or the Affects of Failure in The Legend of Good Women
  2. Steele Nowlin, Hampden-Sydney College, “The Thingness of Chaucer’s Broken Legend
  3. Matthew Irvin, The University of the South, “Dialectics of Failure in The Legend of Good Women
  4. April Graham, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, “Becoming the Villain: Misogyny, Authorship, and Erroneous Ethics in The Legend of Good Women
  5. Sophia Ya-shih Liu, National Taiwan University, “The Legend of Good Women: Chaucer’s Failed Collection?”


10B Paper Panel: The Audible Medieval Past (1)
(PP1)
Thread: Medieval Media
Organizer: Joseph Taylor, University of Alabama-Huntsville
Chair: Joseph Taylor

  1. Rosemarie McGerr, Indiana University-Bloomington, “Voicing Identity, Community, and Diversity in The Second Shepherds’ Play: Polyphony as Medieval English Dramatic Experience“
  2. Jamie Friedman, Westmont College, “‘Vpon He3e and Down Low’: The Sonoric Landscape of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight”
  3. Jeffrey Jerome Cohen, George Washington University, “Fnorteth”


10C Roundtable: Encyclopedic Experiments
(Bancroft 3.26)
Thread: Scientiae
Organizers: Kellie Robertson, University of Maryland, and Emily Steiner, University of Pennsylvania 
Chair: Kellie Robertson

  1. Matthew Giancarlo, University of Kentucky, “Encyclopedic Vision and Compendial Form in the De regimine Tradition: Poets and Popular Constitutionalism”
  2. Elly Truitt, Bryn Mawr College, “Technologies of Time: Astronomical Clocks as Universal History”
  3. Joy Partridge, The Graduate Center, CUNY, “Visualizing Knowledge in the Breviari d’amor
  4. Suzanne Akbari, University of Toronto, “The Medieval Theory of Everything: Wax, Eggs, Color, and the Whole World”


10D Paper Panel: Richard Bury and His Circle
(Bancroft 1.13a)
Thread: Chaucerian Networks
Organizer: Neil Cartlidge, Durham University
Chair: Neil Cartlidge
 

  1. Thomas Hahn, University of Rochester, “Manuscripts as Social Media in the Circle of Richard Bury”
  2. Edit Anna Lukács, University of Vienna, “Dreams of Necessity in the Nun’s Priest’s Tale: Chaucer as a Reader of Thomas Bradwardine”
  3. Jack Bell, Duke University, “Robert Holcot’s Pagans: Faith, Justice, and Community in the Reign of Edward III”


10E Roundtable: The Sensuous Body
(Bancroft 1.15)
Thread: Corporealities
Organizers: Richard Newhauser, Arizona State University-Tempe, and Larry Scanlon, Rutgers University
Chair: Larry Scanlon

  1. Sylvia Tomasch, Hunter College, “Blazon and the Green Knight”
  2. Casey Ireland, University of Virginia, “‘Noght wol I knowe compaignye of man’: Masculine Conceptions of Autonomous Femininity in The Knight’s Tale
  3. Laura Pereira, University of Santiago de Compostela, “Fair Nudity: Unexpected Erotic Effects in the Late Middle Ages”
  4. Oya Bayiltmis Ogutcu, Adiyaman University, “The Corporeal Performance of the Wife of Bath’s Desiring Body”
  5. Julie Orlemanski, University of Chicago, “The Mouth in the Song of Songs


10F Seminar: Meters and Stanza-Forms: The Favorite and the Forgotten
(Arts 2 Lecture Theatre)
Thread: Literary Forms
Organizers: Jenni Nuttall, University of Oxford, and Eric Weiskott, Boston College
Chair: Eric Weiskott

  1. Jessica Henderson, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto, “Middle English Verse Phlebotomy: Medicine in Rhyme”
  2. Daniel Sawyer, University of Oxford, “Rhymes without Lines and Reading for Balance”
  3. Ruth Evans, Saint Louis University, “Chaucerian Rhyme-Breaking”
  4. Katharine Jager, University of Houston-Downtown, “‘With heigh stile he enditeth’: The Uses of Rime Royale”
  5. Ad Putter, University of Bristol, “Chaucer’s Headless Lines”
  6. Nicholas Myklebust, Regis University, “Dipodic Meter in the Age of Chaucer”
  7. Amanda Holton, University of Reading, “Blank Verse and the Unrhymed Line in Middle English Poetry”

​Pre-circulated materials for this seminar can be found at http://newchaucersociety.org/hub/entry/10f-meters-and-stanza-forms-the-favorite-and-the-forgotten


10G Roundtable: New Histories of the English Language
(Skeel Lecture Theatre)
Organizer: Seeta Chaganti, University of California-Davis
Chair: Claire Waters, University of California-Davis

  1. Sarah Novacich, Rutgers University, “Generative Form"
  2. Nicholas Watson, Harvard University, “Language History Is Religious History: Vernacular Textuality and Religious Reform, 1100-1500”
  3. Andrea Denny-Brown, University of California-Riverside, “Smooth or Rough? Lydgate and the History of the English Language”
  4. Daniel Remein, University of Massachusetts-Boston, “Avant-Garde Medievalism and the Aesthetics of Linguistic History"


10H Roundtable: Chaucer in the College Classroom
(PP2)
Organizers: Disa Gambera, University of Utah, and Peter Travis, Dartmouth College
Chair: Disa Gambera

  1. Robert Stretter, Providence College, “Selling Chaucer: The Draws and Dangers of TV Adaptations in the Classroom”
  2. Elizabeth Schirmer, New Mexico State University, “Teaching Chaucer on the Border”
  3. Mary Raschko, Whitman College, “Reading in Community: Taking Chaucer Beyond the Classroom”
  4. Sandy Feinstein, Pennsylvania State University, Berks, “Remediating Chaucer and the Middle Ages”
  5. Daniel Kline, University of Alaska, Anchorage, “Gamifying Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales


10I Roundtable: Anchorite Spirituality
(David Sizer LT)
Organizers: Michelle M. Sauer, University of North Dakota, and Susannah Mary Chewning, Union County College
Chair: Michelle Sauer

  1. Will Rogers, University of Louisiana at Monroe, “The Physicality of Absence: Katharine Hardell and St. Bartholomew’s”
  2. Jennifer Brown, Marymount Manhattan College, “The Orchard Inside the Walls”
  3. Sheila Fisher, Trinity College, “Julian in a Nutshell, or A Room With A View”
  4. Amanda Wetmore, University of Toronto, “Conceptualizations of the Anchorhold in Two Middle English Translations of Aelred’s De Institutione inclusarum
  5. Liam Lewis, University of Warwick, “Stones of the Heart: Love, Sex, and Mineral Transformation”


3:00-3:15    Break


3:15-4:45    SESSIONS: GROUP 11

11A Paper Panel: Foreign Capital: Texts, Contact, and Culture in Late Medieval London  
(Arts 2 Lecture Theatre)
Thread: London: Books, Texts, Lives
Organizer: Sebastian Sobecki, University of Groningen
Chair: Sebastian Sobecki

  1. Anthony Bale, Birkbeck, University of London, “The Lee and Wighton Families Read Mandeville: Manuscripts and Travelers in Fifteenth-Century London and Italy”
  2. Craig Bertolet, Auburn University, “The Pardoner as Connoisseur: Encountering the Wine Trade as Foreign Capital in Chaucer and Gower”
  3. Ruth Lexton, Wellington College, “Costly Bodies: Trade and Travel in Blanchardyn and Eglantine


11B Roundtable: The Legend of Good Women: Chaucer’s Mistake? (2)
(Skeel Lecture Theatre)
Thread: Error
Organizers: Betsy McCormick, Mount San Antonio College, Leah Schwebel, Texas State University, and Lynn Shutters, Colorado State University
Chair: Leah Schwebel

  1. Nicole Sidhu, East Carolina University, “Fathers and Daughters in Chaucer’s The Legend of Good Women
  2. Barbara Zimbalist, University of Texas at El Paso, “The Pedagogy of Failure: Teaching The Legend of Good Women in the Undergraduate Chaucer Course and Beyond”
  3. Tara Williams, Oregon State University, “Chaucer’s Good Women as Marvelous Failures”
  4. Kara Doyle, Union College, “Mansplaining: Chaucer, Cupid, Lydgate, and Tanner 346”

RESPONDENT: Elizabeth Robertson, University of Glasgow 


11C Roundtable: The Audible Medieval Past (2)
(Bancroft 1.13)
Thread: Medieval Media
Organizer: Joseph Taylor, University of Alabama, Huntsville
Chair: Joseph Taylor

  1. Daniel Ransom, University of Oklahoma, “Chaucer Makes Noise”
  2. Norm Klassen, St Jerome's University in the University of Waterloo, “The Sound of the Inner Word and Chaucer's Words to the Host”
  3. Ingrid Pierce, Purdue University, “Sound in the Works of the Pearl poet”
  4. David Hadbawnik, American University of Kuwait, “‘This hole Elementarie’: Contested Letters, Orthography, and Sound in Early English Poetry”


11D Roundtable: The Experience of Fiction (2)
(Bancroft 1.13a)
Thread: Scientiae
Organizers: Marco Nievergelt, Institut d’Etudes Avancées de Paris, and Julie Orlemanski, University of Chicago
Chair: Julie Orlemanski

  1. Rebecca Davis, University of California-Irvine, “‘(T)he rokkes been aweye’: Fictionality and ‘apparence’ in the Franklin’s Tale
  2. Joanna Bellis, Merton College, University of Oxford, “Rethinking ‘the historian’s right of invention’”
  3. Erika Harman, University of Pennsylvania, “Old Rehearsals, New Inventions: Fictional Elements Antithetical and Integral to Medieval Sermons”
  4. Angela Jane Weisl, Seton Hall University, “‘Tyme and Space’: Graphing Fiction in the Canterbury Tales
  5. Carolynn Van Dyke, Lafayette College, “The (Real) Elephant in the Room: Bestiary Fictionality”


11E Seminar: Teaching Drama After Chaucer
(PP2)
Thread: Ritual, Pageant, Spectacle
Organizer: Theresa Coletti, University of Maryland
Chair: Theresa Coletti

  1. Christine Chism, University of California-Los Angeles, “Teaching Drama after Chaucer: Open-Scripting the Play of Noah”
  2. Holly Crocker, University of South Carolina, “John Phillip’s Plaie of Pacient Grissell and Late Medieval Drama”
  3. Leah Haught, University of West Georgia, “Fragments, Framing Devices, and Female Literacy: Teaching the N-Town Marian Material”
  4. Kara McShane, Ursinus College, “Troubling (and Troubled) Identities: Teaching the Prioress with the Croxton Play of the Sacrament”
  5. Matthew Sergi, University of Toronto, “Incompletion and Interaction: Teaching The Pride of Life
  6. Emma Maggie Solberg, Bowdoin College, “The Wife of Bath as Spectator”

Pre-circulated materials for this seminar can be found at http://newchaucersociety.org/hub/entry/11e-teaching-drama-after-chaucer


11F Paper Panel: Intent and the Haphazard in Medieval Books
(PP1)
Thread: Literary Forms
Organizers: Elizaveta Strakhov, Marquette University, Zachary Hines, University of Texas-Austin, and Boyda Johnstone, Fordham University
Chairs: Zachary Hines and Elizaveta Strakhov

  1. Venetia Bridges, University of Leeds, “Imposing Order upon Chaos: The Mysterious Materiality of Later Medieval Manuscripts” 
  2. Jason Escandell, University of Texas at Austin, “Accidentally Medieval Books: Compiling Chaucer in the Sixteenth Century”
  3. Julia Boffey, Queen Mary University of London, “‘Blynde entencioun’ and ‘sodeyn hap’: The Inclusion of Chaucer's Lyrics in Fifteenth-Century Manuscript Anthologies”


11G Roundtable: Arts of Dying (2)
(Bancroft 1.15)
Organizer: Amy Appleford, Boston University 
Chair: Amy Appleford

  1. Sif Rikhardsdottir, University of Iceland, “Affective Dying and Loving in Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde
  2. Sarah Wilson, Northwestern University, “‘Meche Mournynge and Myrthe Was Mellyd To-geder’: The Politics of Mourning in the Alliterative St.Erkenwald
  3. J. Justin Brent, Presbyterian College, “Ante Ars moriendi: Eschatological Clusters in Middle English Manuscripts"
  4. Colin Fewer, Purdue University Northwest, “The Soul in Pain: The Doctrine of Purgatory in Late-Medieval English Social Practice”


11H Roundtable: Aberrant Adventures
(Bancroft 3.26)
Organizer: Susan Crane, Columbia University
Chair: Susan Crane

  1. Lynn Staley, Colgate University, “Havelok’s Long Arms”
  2. Leila K. Norako, Stanford University, “(Ab)errant Heroics in Richard Coer de Lyon
  3. Jenna Stook, Mount Royal University, “Civilian Casualties: Interrogating Knightly Heroism in Beues of Hamtoun
  4. Kristi J. Castleberry, Lyndon State College, “A Damsel on a Quest: Malory’s Elaine of Astolat”
  5. Karla Taylor, University of Michigan, “Sir Bors’s Choice: Representing Mental Adventures”


11I Roundtable: Medievalisms
(David Sizer LT)
Organizer: Thomas Prendergast, College of Wooster
Chair: Thomas Prendergast

  1. Kimberly Fonzo, University of Texas at San Antonio, “Refashioning a Prophetic Author in Chaucerian Apocrypha”
  2. Vicki Larsen, University of Michigan-Flint, “Dryden’s Chaucer, Cressy’s Julian, and the 17th-Century Future of Middle English”
  3. Velma Bourgeois Richmond, Holy Names University, “Chaucer’s London in Historical Novels for the Young”
  4. Jade Standing, University of British Columbia, “The Famous History (and the renowned fictionality) of the Knight of the Burning Pestle
  5. Adin Lears, SUNY-Oswego, “Medieval Sound and Radical Poetics at the Turn of the 20th Century”


6:00-7:00    Plenary Session: Biennial Chaucer Lecture
(The Porter Tun at the Brewery, 52 Chiswell Street, EC1) 
Chair: Susan Crane, Columbia University
Introduction: David Matthews, University of Manchester
Stephanie Trigg, University of Melbourne, “Chaucer’s Silent Discourse”

*The Biennial Chaucer Lecture, the reception and the congress banquet will take place at The Brewery, a magnificent space built in 1750, in the heart of the City of London. 

7:00        Reception followed by Congress Banquet
(The Porter Tun at the Brewery) 
The reception is open to all Congress delegates. Sign up for the banquet will be available as part of online Registration.

Schedule: Wednesday 13 July

9:00-10:30    SESSIONS: GROUP 6

6A Roundtable: Literary Afterlives of Medieval London
(Arts 2 Lecture Theatre)
Thread: London: Books, Texts, Lives
Organizer: Bruce Holsinger, University of Virginia
Chair: Bruce Holsinger

  1. Andrew Lynch, University of Western Australia, “Charles Dickens’s Medieval London”
  2. Anne McKendry, University of Melbourne, “Soiled Knights and Mean Streets: The London of Medieval Crime Fiction”
  3. Courtney Catherine Barajas, University of Texas-Austin, “The Clerkenwell Tales and the Aesthetic of Place”
  4. John Ganim, University of California-Riverside, “William Morris, News from Nowhere, and the Built Environment”
  5. Theresa Coletti, University of Maryland, “Cromwell’s London”


6B Paper Panel: Scribal Error
(Bancroft 1.13)
Thread: Error
Organizers: Andrew Kraebel, Trinity University, and Daniel Wakelin, University of Oxford
Chair: Andrew Kraebel 

  1. Anya Adair, Yale University, “Taking Scribal Error to Court: Variation and Authority in Statute Collections”
  2. Paul A. Broyles, University of Virginia, “Errare in Romance”
  3. Michael Madrinkian, University of Oxford, “The Influence of Error: Reconsidering the Authorial Revision of Piers Plowman


6C Roundtable: Beyond the Imagetext
(Skeel Lecture Theatre)
Thread: Medieval Media
Organizers: Jessica Brantley, Yale University, and Ingrid Nelson, Amherst College
Chair: Jessica Brantley
 

  1. Ashby Kinch, University of Montana, “Framing Problems: User Interface and the Late Medieval Illustrated Manuscript”
  2. Nicholas Perkins, St. Hugh's College, University of Oxford, “‘The sleighte and the compassynge’: Word and Image in Manchester, John Rylands Library MS English 1”
  3. Sonja Drimmer, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, “Autographs, Allographs, and the Imagetext in Manuscript Culture”
  4. Amy Appleford, Boston University, “Singing the Dirige: Job and Imaginative Ascetic Practice”
  5. Catherine Brown, University of Michigan, “Manuscript is the New Digital” 


6D Roundtable: The Mathematical Imaginary
(Bancroft 1.13a)
Thread: Scientiae
Organizer: Tekla Bude, Newnham College, Cambridge
Chair: Tekla Bude

  1. Shazia Jagot, University of Southern Denmark, “Chaucer’s Arabic Mathematical Divination: Geomancy in the Knight’s Tale and Troilus and Criseyde
  2. Alexandra Gillespie, University of Toronto, “Why Can’t Chaucer Count?”
  3. Valerie Allen, John Jay College, CUNY, “Algebraic Notation, Poetic Conceit, and the Development of the Symbolic”
  4. Anne Schuurman, University of Western Ontario, “Calculation Anxiety: Debt in The Canterbury Tales” 


6E Roundtable: Public Interiorities
(Bancroft 1.15)
Thread: Ritual, Pageant, Spectacle
Organizer: Katherine Zieman, University of Oxford
Chair: Fiona Somerset, University of Connecticut

  1. Michelle M. Sauer, University of North Dakota, “Inside Out: Anchoritic Performances Among the Laity”
  2. Sara Fredman, Washington University in St. Louis, “Lay Religious Exemplarity in Eleanor Hull’s Psalm Commentary”
  3. Sarah McNamer, Georgetown University, “Public Interiority and Family Feeling at the Court of Edward III”
  4. William Askins, Community College of Philadelphia, “A Script for the Mumming at Eltham. Christmas, 1400”


6F Roundtable: Divergent Bodies and the Making of the Middle Ages
(PP2)
Thread: Corporealities
Organizer: Richard H. Godden, Tulane University and Dorothy Kim, Vassar College
Chair: Dorothy Kim

  1. Roberta Magnani, Swansea University, “‘The Goddess of ‘thre formes’: Diana, Metamorphosis, Divergence and the Politics of Identity Formation”
  2. Elizabeth Melick, Kent State University, “Killing Hermengild and Converting England: Displays of Male Control in the Man of Law’s Tale
  3. Dana Roders, Purdue University, “‘To-Bollen for Wrathe’: The Discourse of Disability in Piers Plowman
  4. Robert W. Barrett, Jr., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, “Sweet Fruits and Barren Figs: Separating Christian and Jewish Zoophytes in Fifteenth-Century East Anglian Drama”


6G Roundtable: Translating Global Chaucers
(PP1)
Thread: Uses of the Medieval
Organizer: Candace Barrington, Central Connecticut State University 
Chair: Candace Barrington

  1. Stephanie Downes, University of Melbourne, “Vilains mots! Nineteenth-Century French Translations of the Canterbury Tales
  2. Marcin Ciura, Independent Translator, “In the Margins of the Polish Parlement of Foules
  3. Züleyha Çetiner-Ōktem, Ege University, “Reinventing Chaucer's Sir Thopas from a Turkish Perspective”
  4. Denise Ming-yueh, National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan, “When Global Chaucers Go Local: Reading Chaucer in Taiwan”


6H Paper Panel: Sensing Nature
(Bancroft 3.26)
Organizers: Justin L. Barker, Purdue University and Ingrid Pierce, Purdue University
Chair: Richard Newhauser, Arizona State University-Tempe

  1. Lotte Reinbold, University of Cambridge, “Unnatural Gardens: Natural Space and Literary Artifice in Dream Poetry”
  2. Myra Wright, Queens College, CUNY, “The Feelings that Follow Chaucer’s Whelp” 
  3. Jamie Taylor, Bryn Mawr College, “Feeling English:  Fatherly Love and Childish Desire in Chaucer’s Treatise on the Astrolabe


6I Paper Panel: Materiality and Materialism
(David Sizer LT)
Organizers: Katherine Little, University of Colarado, and Nicholas Perkins, University of Oxford
Chair: Isabel Davis, Birkbeck, University of London 

  1. Daniel Davies, University of Pennsylvania, “‘Longa est series … malorum’: The Necklace of Harmonia from Statius to Chaucer” 
  2. Kathleen Tonry, University of Connecticut, “The Country in the City: Materialisms of ‘Rural’ Texts at the End of the 15th Century”

Respondent: Elizabeth Schirmer, New Mexico State University


10:30-11:00 Coffee Break


11:00-12:30    SESSIONS: GROUP 7

7A Paper Panel: Overlapping Errors 
(Bancroft 1.13)
Thread: Error
Organizer: Robert S. Sturges, Arizona State University
Chair: Marilynn Desmond, SUNY Binghamton

  1. Jane Gilbert, University College London, “London's Burning: the Queer Tongue of Chaucer’s Prioress”
  2. Leah Klement, Caltech/The Huntington Library, “‘A Land Born of Varied Seed’: Exile, Error, and Englishness in Gower's Vox Clamantis
  3. Lee Manion, University of Missouri, “‘(P)eruertyd’ History and Elected Rulers: Fictions of Sovereignty in St. Erkenwald


7B Paper Panel: Media and the Medieval Manuscript
(Bancroft 1.13a)
Thread: Medieval Media
Organizer: Linne Mooney, University of York, and Wendy Scase, University of Birmingham
Chair: Wendy Scase

  1. Angela Bennett, University of Nevada-Reno, “The Networked Corpus: Thinking Beyond the Codex in Digital Manuscript Studies”
  2. Robin Wharton, Georgia State University and Elon Lang, University of Texas at Austin, “Archive or Scriptorium?: Digital Scholarship and Textual Studies”
  3. Victoria Flood, Durham University, and Aisling Byrne, University of Reading, “Pan-insular Medieval Translation Networks and the Digital Hive Mind”


7C Roundtable: Curiosity in Theory and Practice
(PP1)
Thread: Scientiae
Organizer: Patricia Clare Ingham, Indiana University
Chair: Richard Newhauser, Arizona State University-Tempe 

  1. Michael Raby, McGill University, “The Philosopher in the Pit: Blumenberg, Chaucer, and the History of Theoretical Curiosity”
  2. Jennifer Sisk, University of Vermont, “Langland’s Curious God”
  3. Elizabeth Allen, University of California-Irvine, “Magic and the Space of Curiosity in St. Erkenwald
  4. Alastair Bennett, Royal Holloway, University of London, “Curiositas and the Unwilling Narrator in Chaucer and Langland”

 

7D Roundtable: Bohemia
(PP2)
Thread: Chaucerian Networks
Organizer: Michael Van Dussen, McGill University
Chair: Michael Van Dussen

  1. Fiona Somerset, University of Connecticut, “Between England and Bohemia: Insurgent gentes in Motion”
  2. Marcela Perett, North Dakota State University, “Fed Up with the Miracle: Popular Response to Wyclif’s Eucharistic Critique in England and in Bohemia”
  3. Ryan Perry, University of Kent, “Reappraising ‘First Seith Boece’: Thomas Arundel, Anne of Bohemia’s Funeral, and Other Metropolitan Anecdotes”
  4. Alfred Thomas, University of Illinois at Chicago, “Anne of Bohemia and Female Learning at the Royal Court of Prague”


7E Paper Panel: Performing Gendered Chaucerian Spaces
(Bancroft 1.15)
Thread: Ritual, Pageant, Spectacle
Organizer: Emma Lipton, University of Missouri
Chair: Emma Lipton

  1. Laura Saetveit Miles, University of Bergen, “Performing Female Masculinity in the Margins: Glosses on the Wife of Bath’s Prologue”
  2. Emilie Cox, Indiana University, “Gender and Space in the Reeve​’s Tale
  3. Anna Johnson Lyman, University of Pennsylvania, “‘Women desire of al thynges soverayntee’: Chaucer, Vernacular History, and Female Power”


7F Paper Panel: The Limits of the Literary 2: The Literary and Non-Literary, Convergence and Divergence
(Bancroft 3.26)
Thread: Literary Forms
Organizer: Jonathan Stavsky, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and Tom Stillinger, University of Utah
Chair: Tom Stillinger

  1. Kara Gaston, University of Toronto, “Literature as Aberration”
  2. Eva von Contzen, University of Freiburg, “Chaucer and the Poetics of Listing”
  3. Claire Waters, University of California-Davis, “Letters of Our Lady: Marian Poetry and the Edges of the Literary”


7G Seminar: Medieval and Modern in the Classroom
(David Sizer LT)
Thread: Uses of the Medieval
Organizer: Katharine Breen, Northwestern University
Chair: Katharine Breen

  1. Stephanie Batkie, The University of the South, “Chronology as Teleology: Rethinking Timelines in the Medieval and Early Modern Survey”
  2. Thomas Blake, Austin College, “Querying Gender Fluidity in Silence and Middlesex
  3. Timothy S. Miller, Sarah Lawrence College, “Chaucer the Cyborg: Science Fiction and Medieval Literature in the Classroom”
  4. Kara Crawford, The Bishop’s School, “Chaucer and Frankenstein”
  5. Suzanne Edwards, Lehigh University, “Bailey’s Cafe as Epilogue to the Canterbury Tales
  6. Sarah W. Townsend, University of Pennsylvania, “Propaganda and Persuasion in English Drama — Then and Now”

Pre-circulated materials for this seminar can be found at http://newchaucersociety.org/hub/entry/7g-medieval-and-modern-in-the-classroom


7H Medieval Lectio: A Schoolroom Laboratory 
(Arts 2 Lecture Theatre)
Organizers: Christopher Cannon, New York University, and Emily Steiner, University of Pennsylvania     
Magister: Dr. Kurt Smolak, University of Vienna

This session will investigate the procedures of basic literacy training in the age of Chaucer by reenacting them. In the first half of the session, “students” will be introduced to a Latin school-text (or some aspects of it) by a teacher proceeding entirely in Latin; in the second half, the classroom experience will be discussed by participants as well as members of the audience. A central area of interest will be the complexities involved in teaching a new language in that language, but the laboratory will also offer the opportunity for participants to repeat the wholly Chaucerian experience of a pedagogy that ignores the vernacular they share. Volunteers interested in participating as students should write to Chris (cc131@nyu.edu) or Emily (steinere@english.upenn.edu) prior to the congress (no knowledge of Latin required!)


7I Paper Panel: Fifty Years of The Chaucer Review: Looking Back, Looking Forward
(Skeel Lecture Theatre)
Organizers: Susanna Fein and David Raybin
Chair: Susanna Fein

  1. Robert J. Meyer-Lee, Agnes Scott College, “Valuing Chaucer”
  2. Leah Schwebel, Texas State University, “Myn Auctor Lollius”
  3. Robert Edwards, Pennsylvania State University, “Chaucerian Retrospect”
  4. Helen Cooper, Magdalene College, Cambridge, “Then and Now”


12:30-2:00    Lunch

 

2:00-3:00        Graduate Workshops – Senate House Special Collections Reading Room
3:00-4:00        (by application only)  
                        
Hands-on workshop with tour of early print collections

2:00-5:00    Half-day Excursions

During the afternoon, a range of excursions will be offered; many of these excursions are limited to a small number of participants, and registration for places, and further details, will be available as part of the on-line registration:

http://eshop.qmul.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&deptid=34&catid=1&prodid=582

The excursions will include:

  1. Coach trip to Eltham Palace (generously supported by English Heritage). A stunning medieval palace with the Courtauld family's 1930s modernist house attached, nestling in woodland in south-east London. Chaucer was Clerk of the Works at Eltham Palace; he is said to have supervised the building of the bridge over the moat there. Eltham Palace also was the setting for one of Lydgate's mummings, the favorite royal residence of Henry VI and Edward IV, and where the young Henry VIII grew up. Visitors can see the medieval tiltyard, the magnificent Great Hall, and will be taken on a tour of the medieval and modern parts of the house.
  2. A walking tour of medieval London, led by Paul Strohm and Elliot Kendall (convened by Marion Turner and Bruce Holsinger as part of their London: Books, Texts, and Lives thread).
  3. Westminster Abbey Muniments tour.
  4. Visit to the library of St Paul’s Cathedral, generously supported by the Archdeacon of London, The Ven. Nick Mercer. 
  5. Livery company visits.


6:30-7:45    Theatre Performance
        Poculi Ludique Societas, “The Pride of Life” 
        (People’s Palace Theatre)
PLS (Poculi Ludique Societas), an acclaimed theatre company affiliated with the University of Toronto, is proud to present a fully professional production of the late fourteenth-century morality play, The Pride of Life, co-directed by Matthew Sergi and Ara Glenn-Johanson, and made possible by generous support from the Connaught Fund's New Researcher Award.  This cast of six women will playfully reframe the anti-feminist themes in the text; since only the first half of the Pride manuscript survives, they draw on audience input to improvise the play's lost conclusion differently at every showing.  The medieval music trio, Pneuma Ensemble, will provide musical accompaniment.


8:00-9:00    Two Special Events

Multilingual Chaucer: Patience Agbabi
(Arts 2 Lecture Theatre)
Convener: Candace Barrington
Open Event.
Patience Agbabi is former Poet Laureate of Canterbury. Telling Tales (Canongate, 2014), in which she disperses Chaucerian narratives in present-day multiethnic London, was shortlisted for the Ted Hughes Award for New Work in Poetry. Her work appears also in the anthology The Refugee Tales (Comma Press, 2016). She will deliver an interactive reading “Herkne and Rede” that explores poetry performance as dynamic adaptation.

An Evening of Medieval Music by Opus Anglicanum 
(Arts 2 Drama Studio)
Convener: Sarah Salih 
Ticketed event: please sign up at registration.
        

Schedule: Tuesday 12 July

9:00-10:30    SESSIONS: GROUP 3

3A Paper Panel: London Bridge

(Bancroft 1.13)
Thread: London: Books, Texts, Lives
Organizer: Catherine Sanok, University of Michigan 
Chair: Catherine Sanok

  1. Sarah Breckenridge Wright, Duquesne University, “Vagrants and Viaducts: Representing London Bridge in The Cook’s Tale
  2. Sheila Coursey, University of Michigan, “The Box Seats: Severed Heads and the Pageantry of London Bridge”
  3. Jennifer Jahner, Caltech, “Becket at London’s Bounds: Sainthood and the Architectures of Citizenship”


3B Roundtable: Queer Manuscripts: The Textuality of Error (2)
(PP1)
Thread: Error
Organizers: Roberta Magnani, Swansea University, and Diane Watt, Surrey University
Chair: Roberta Magnani

  1. M.W. Bychowski, The George Washington University, “Trans Textuality”
  2. Kathleen E. Kennedy, Penn State-Brandywine, “The Queerness of Miscellanies”
  3. Jamie Staples, New York University, “I See It, But I'm Not Quite Sure What It Is, or The Discomfort with Cleanness as a Naked Text”
  4. Amy Louise Morgan, University of Surrey, “‘Oueral enker-grene’: How Queer is the Green Knight in British Library MS Cotton Nero A.x.?”
  5. Lucy Allen, University of Cambridge, “Traumatic Displacement in the Alliterative Morte Arthure and Malory”


3C Seminar: Medieval Multimodalities/Digital Multimodalities
(Skeel Lecture Theatre)
Thread: Medieval Media 
Organizers: Dorothy Kim, Vassar College, and Katharine Jager, University of Houston-Downtown
Chair: Dorothy Kim 

  1. Meg Worley, Colgate University, “Hyperreading Then and Now”
  2. Kate Maxwell, University of Tromsø, “Beyond Sound, Image and Text: The (More) Hidden Modes of the Manuscript”
  3. Laura Kendrick, Universite de Versailles, “Medieval Re-mediations of The Apostle’s Creed for Multimodal Interpretive Communities”
  4. Heather Blatt, Florida International University, “Multimodality and Wall Text Verses in Manuscript”
  5. Susan Yager, Iowa State University, “The Multimodal and the End of Silence”
  6. Mark Amsler, University of Auckland, “Linguistic Ecology and Hybrid Mothers”
  7. Elon Lang, University of Texas at Austin, and Robin Wharton, Georgia State University, “Exploring Medieval Mulitmodality through Pedagogy of Making and Remediation”

Pre-circulated materials for this seminar can be found at http://newchaucersociety.org/hub/entry/3c-seminar-medieval-multimodalities-digital-multimodalities 


3D Roundtable: The Experience of Fiction (1)
(PP2)
Thread: Scientiae
Organizers: Marco Nievergelt, Institut d’Etudes Avancées de Paris, and Julie Orlemanski, University of Chicago
Chair: Marco Nievergelt 

  1. Darragh Greene, University College, Dublin, “The Value of ‘Chaf’, or Chaucer’s Praise of ‘Folye’”
  2. Laura Ashe, Worcester College, University of Oxford, “Fiction as Ethical Exercise”
  3. Jessica Lockhart, University of Toronto, “‘It seems impossible, but it’s necessary’: The Poetics of Fiction in the Secretum philosophorum
  4. David Lavinsky, Yeshiva University-New York, “‘Why ask why?’: Romance, Counterfactuality, and the Making of Fiction”


3E Roundtable: Narrative Conduits
(Bancroft 1.13a)
Thread: Chaucerian Networks
Organizer: Leila K. Norako, Stanford University, and Kristi J. Castleberry, Lyndon State College
Chair: Kristi J. Castleberry

  1. Andrew M. Richmond, Ohio State University, “‘þe marches of þe cee’: Navigable Waterways and the Shaping of Narrative in Kyng Alisaunder and Titus and Vespasian
  2. Amber Dove Clark, University of Texas, “Wandering ‘on the Rokke (…) Over the see’: the Ocean as Natural Boundary and Narrative Conduit in Charles of Orleans’s English Dream” 
  3. Sarah Crover, University of British Columbia, “Monmouth’s Thames: Unpredictable Messenger of Divine Will”
  4. Gina Marie Hurley, Yale University, “Souls and the Sea in the Digby Mary Magdalene


3F Paper Panel: Corporeal Fluidity: Written in Stone
(Bancroft 1.15)
Thread: Corporealities
Organizer: Liz Herbert McAvoy, Swansea University
Chair: Liz Herbert McAvoy

  1. Sophia Wilson, King’s College London, “Petrified Women and Stony Animacy in William Caxton’s c.1480 Metamorphose
  2. Kathy Lavezzo, University of Iowa, “Bodies and Buildings: The Jews of Lincoln and the Hereford Mappamundi”
  3. Mary Beth Long and Kim Sexton, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, “Toward a Theology of Maternity: Margery Kempe’s Built Environment” 

 

3G Roundtable: Literary Value in 2016
Bancroft 3.26)
Thread: Literary Forms
Organizer: Robert J. Meyer-Lee, Agnes Scott College
Chair: Robert J. Meyer-Lee

  1. Siobhain Bly Calkin, Carleton University, “What is the Literary Value of a Name?”
  2. Thomas J. Farrell, Stetson University, “The Literary and the Humanistic in 2016”
  3. Ingrid Nelson, Amherst College, “Lyric Values”
  4. Amy Goodwin, Randolph-Macon College, “Chaucerian Ephemera and Literary Value”
  5. Eric Weiskott, Boston College, “Meter as a Specifically Literary Practice”


3H Paper Panel: Surveillance (2): Hearing, Reading, Writing
(David Sizer LT)
Organizer: Sylvia Tomasch, Hunter College (CUNY)
Chair: Sylvia Tomasch

  1. Ashley Ott, Saint Louis University, “‘Writen in his tables’: Surveillance as Inscription and Erasure in Chaucer”
  2. Jacqueline M. Burek, University of Pennsylvania, "Eyewitness to History or Spy for the English? Historical Research as Surveillance in Robert Mannyng of Brunne’s Chronicle
  3. Martha Rust, New York University, “‘Youre names I entre heer in my rolle anon’: The List and Parchment Roll as Controlled Space"


3I Roundtable: Did Chaucer Have a Mother Tongue? 
In memory of David Trotter

(Arts 2 Lecture Theatre)
Organizers: Christopher Cannon, New York University, and Emily Steiner, University of Pennsylvania
Chair: Ardis Butterfield

  1. Marjorie Curry Woods, University of Texas at Austin, “Was there a Mother Tongue in the Later Middle Ages?”
  2. Georgiana Donavin, Westminster College-Salt Lake City, “Gram/marians and Mother Tongues”
  3. Colette Moore, University of Washington, “Father Chaucer, Mother Tongue” 
  4. Jonathan Hsy, George Washington University, “Gower’s Vernaculars: Interlanguage and Gender” 

​Respondent: Ardis Butterfield, Yale University


10:30-11:00    Coffee Break


11:00-12:30    Presidential Address
(People’s Palace Theatre)
Chair: Ardis Butterfield, Yale Univeristy
Susan Crane, Columbia University, “The litel erth that here is”

 
12:30-2:00     Lunch


2:00-3:30    SESSIONS: GROUP 4

4A Paper Panel: London and the Senses 
(Bancroft 1.13)
Thread: London: Books, Texts, Lives
Organizer: Marion Turner, University of Oxford
Chair: Marion Turner

  1. Joseph Taylor, University of Alabama, “Quiet Riot: Sound Studies and Chaucer’s Ear for the City”
  2. Jenny Boyar, University of Rochester, “Thinking by Heart: Feeling and the Chaucerian Brain”
  3. Elizabeth Edwards, University of King’s College, “The Funerary Sensorium”


4B Roundtable: Textual Error / Textual Correction
(Bancroft 1.13a)
Thread: Error
Organizer: Thomas J. Farrell, Stetson University
Moderator: Thomas J. Farrell

  1. Misty Schieberle, University of Kansas, “Revisiting Error: Scholarly vs. Scribal Mistakes”
  2. Warren Ginsburg, University of Oregon, “Error, Expansion, Translation: The Host’s Stanza”
  3. Carissa Harris, Temple University, “Obscenity as Error: Correcting Chaucer's Obscenities in BL MS Additional 35286”
  4. Stephen Partridge, University of British Columbia, “Variance, Error, Authority: The Part-Divisions of the Knight's Tale


4C Paper Panel: Curiositas
(Bancroft 1.15)
Thread: Scientiae
Organizer: Patricia Clare Ingham, Indiana University
Chair: Patricia Clare Ingham

  1. Richard Newhauser, Arizona State University-Tempe, “Curiosity’s Fall: The Miller’s Tale and Anti-Intellectualism”
  2. Helen Cushman, Harvard University, “Curiositas and Curatio in East Anglian Drama”
  3. Anke Bernau, University of Manchester, “Of Kings and Craftsmen: The Power of Curious Works”


4D Paper Panel: Town and Country Networks in Chaucerian Britain
(Bancroft 3.26)
Thread: Chaucerian Networks
Organizer: Helen Fulton, University of Bristol
Chair: Helen Fulton

  1. Cathy Hume, University of Bristol, “‘Is not this my friend?’: Urban Social Networks and Troilus and Criseyde
  2. Megan Leitch, Cardiff University, “‘By meenes and brocage’: The Politics of Intercession in Chaucerian Networks”
  3. Linne Mooney, University of York, “Networks of Scribes and Patrons in Chaucerian London”


4E Roundtable: Material Culture and Early British Performance
(Skeel Lecture Theatre)
Thread: Ritual, Pageant, Spectacle
Organizer: Gail McMurray Gibson, Davidson College 
Chair: Gail McMurray Gibson

  1. Jessica Brantley, Yale University, “Drama in Alabaster: An Intermedial Comparison”
  2. Christina M. Fitzgerald, University of Toledo, “Putting the Pageant Wagon before the Play in York”
  3. Sarah Stanbury, College of the Holy Cross, “Houses, Halls, and Roofed Chambers: The Ark as Playhouse”
  4. Jay Zysk, University of South Florida, “The Semiotics of Holy Matter in Early English Drama”
  5. Shannon Gayk, Indiana University, Bloomington, “Instrumental Drama”


4F Seminar: (Dis)abling the Human/Animal Body
(PP2)
Thread: Corporealities
Organizer: Haylie Swenson, George Washington University, and Liam Lewis, University of Warwick
Chair: Haylie Swenson and Liam Lewis

  1. Abby Ang, Indiana University, “(Very) Close Encounters: Curiosity and Pain in Marie de France’s ‘The Peasant and the Beetle’”
  2. Teresa P. Reed, Jacksonville State University, “Got Your Nose! Animality as Humanity in Bisclavret
  3. Karl Steel, Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York, “Animals, Gesture, and Communication Despite it All”
  4. Jessica Chace, New York University, “Animal Prostheses and Enabling Technologies in Chaucer’s Squire’s Tale
  5. Andrea Whitacre, Indiana University, “The Bear and the Baby: Lumps of Flesh in the Bestiary and The King of Tars
  6. Rob Wakeman, University of Maryland, “The Simplicity of the Ass”

​Pre-circulated materials for this seminar can be found at http://newchaucersociety.org/hub/entry/4f-disabling-the-human-animal-body


4G  Paper Panel: Chaucerian Shibboleths (2): Teleology 
(Arts 2 Lecture Theatre)
Thread: Uses of the Medieval
Organizers: Ryan McDermott, University of Pittsburgh, and Michelle Karnes, Stanford University
Chair: Michelle Karnes

  1. Rita Copeland, University of Pennsylvania, “Telos”
  2. D. Vance Smith, Princeton University, “Entelechy”
  3. Ryan McDermott, University of Pittsburgh, “Eschatology”


4H Roundtable: Digital Approaches to Middle English Editing
(David Sizer LT)
Organizer: Akiyuki Jimura, Hiroshima University and Okayama University of Science, and Yoshiyuki Nakao, Hiroshima University and Fukuyama University
Chair: Yoshiyuki Nakao

  1. Shay Hopkins, University of California at Santa Barbara, “Encoding Wayfinding Techniques in the Hagiographies of Oxford, Bodleian Library, Laud Misc. 108”
  2. Murray McGillivray, University of Calgary, “The Cotton Nero A.x. Project: Digital Approaches to the Gawain-poems”
  3. Hideshi Ohno, Hiroshima University, “The Manuscripts and Editions of The Canterbury Tales: Textual Variations and Readings”
  4. Timothy Stinson, North Carolina State University, “Editing Piers Plowman: Translatio and Transformations”


4I Paper Panel: Traveler’s Tales and Medieval Ethnographies: Encountering Religious Diversities
(PP1)
Organizer: Christine Chism, University of California – Los Angeles
Chair: Christine Chism

  1. Steven F. Kruger, Queens College and The Graduate Center, CUNY, “An Iberian Jew in London: Solomon ha-Levi/Paul of Burgos’s Purim Letter” 
  2. Stephanie Pentz, Northwestern University, “Ethnographic Encounters and Religious Debate in Alexander and Dindimus
  3. Sierra Lomuto, "Jerusalem in the Myddel: Oppositional Geography and Prester John's Christian Empire in The Book of John Mandeville"


3:30-4:00    Coffee Break


4:00-5:30     SESSIONS: GROUP 5

5A Roundtable: Problem Texts (2)
(Bancroft 1.13)
Thread: Error
Organizer: Megan Cook, Colby College
Chair: Megan Cook

  1. Dabney Bankert, James Madison University, “Chaucer's Problem Poem: The ‘inexplicable,’ ‘rambling,’ ‘tedious,’ ‘puzzling’ House of Fame
  2. Kathleen Burt, Middle Georgia State University, “Mis-taking Chaucer in ‘The Complaint of the Prisoner Against Fortune’”
  3. Brooke Hunter, Villanova University, “‘So sleigh arn clerkes olde’: Forgery, Plagiarism, and Bad Scholarship”
  4. Sarah Noonan, St. Mary's College, “Contemplating Emptiness in Two Early Manuscripts of the Cloud of Unknowing


5B Paper Panel: Charisma 
(Arts 2 Lecture Theatre)
Thread: Medieval Media 
Organizers: Irina Dumitrescu, University of Bonn, and Laura Saetveit Miles, University of Bergen
Chair: Holly Crocker, University of South Carolina

  1. Noelle Phillips, Douglas College, “Kingly Charisma: Royal Image-Crafting in Late Medieval England”
  2. David Wallace, University of Pennsylvania, “Chaucerian Charisma, or What C.S. Lewis Really Did”
  3. Patricia Clare Ingham, Indiana University, “Gawain’s Charisma”


5C Laboratory: Reading the Arts Curriculum         
(Skeel Lecture Theatre)
Thread: Scientiae
Organizer: D. Vance Smith, Princeton University

This session is designed to explore some common university texts that would have structured the intellectual habitus of Chaucer’s university-educated contemporaries. Participants will explore what it was like to be an arts student in Oxford and Cambridge as well as to sample some of the texts that were regularly lectured upon in the so-called “three philosophies” (rational, natural, and moral). After some general remarks on the late medieval university curriculum, discussion will center around short readings from subjects including ethics, logic, natural philosophy, and rhetoric. Discussion leaders will include Martin Camargo, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign; Kellie Robertson, University of Maryland; Jessica Rosenfeld, Washington University in St. Louis; and D. Vance Smith, Princeton University.

Pre-circulated materials for this session can be found at http://newchaucersociety.org/hub/entry/5c-reading-the-arts-curriculum


5D Roundtable: After Chaucer
(PP2)
Thread: Chaucerian Networks
Organizers: Aditi Nafde, Newcastle University, and Elon Lang, University of Texas, Austin
Chair: Elon Lang
 

  1. Jenni Nuttall, St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford, “Form and Fashion in Lancastrian Poems”
  2. Gabriel Haley, Concordia University, “Secularized Contemplation: Chaucer's Lyrics in the Fifteenth Century”
  3. Helen Hickey, University of Melbourne, “How Are Authors Made? Reading Chaucer and Hoccleve with the Encyclopedists”
  4. Madeleine L. Saraceni, Yale University, “‘He fo in herte is vnto wommen alle’: Antagonism and Ambivalence in Hoccleve’s The Series
  5. Phillipa Hardman, University of Reading, “A Late-Middle-English Literary Decorator: Chaucerian Echoes in the Sowdone of Babylone


5E Roundtable: Teaching with Torture: Violence as Spectacle in the Classroom
(Bancroft 1.13a)
Thread: Ritual, Pageant, Spectacle
Organizer: Nicole Nyffenegger, Bern University
Chair: Nicole Nyffenegger

  1. Sarah Nangle, University College Dublin, “Mean Girls: Gender and Violence in Abu Ghraib and Chaucer's Prioress’ Tale
  2. Cara Hersh, University of Portland, “Spitting Images: Pedagogies of Purity, Spectacle, and Violence in the Prioress’ Tale
  3. Dianne Berg, Tufts University, “‘This is ynogh, Grisilde myn’: Personal Suffering and Public Subjugation in the Clerk’s Tale
  4. Kathrin Scheuchzer, University of Bern, “The Reader as Spectator in John Foxe’s Actes and Monuments
  5. John Hoarty, Saint Ignatius College Prep, “Cloaked in Virtue, Soaked in Blood: Romantic Narrative as Disguise in the Knight’s Tale


5F Paper Panel: Embodied Emotions, Emotional Bodies (1): Falling and Fallen Bodies
(Bancroft 1.15)
Thread: Corporealities
Organizer: Stephanie Downes, University of Melbourne
Chair: Barry Windeatt, Emmanuel College, Cambridge

  1. Victoria Blud, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York, “‘Double Sorwe:’ Embodied Emotion and Gendered Bodies in Troilus and Criseyde
  2. Lynn Shutters, Colorado State University, “The Anatomy of a Swoon in Chaucer’s Book of the Duchess
  3. Rachel Levinson-Emley, University of California, Santa Barbara, “Arcite’s Inexpressible Love: Hereos and Bleeding in The Knight’s Tale


5G Paper Panel: The Limits of the Literary 1: Spiritual Constraints and Literary Possibilities
(PP1)
Thread: Literary Forms
Organizers: James Simpson, Harvard University, and Eva von Contzen, University of Freiburg
Chairs: James Simpson and Eva von Contzen 

  1. Catherine Sanok, University of Michigan, “The Vernicle and the Archive”
  2. Jonathan Stavsky, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, “‘Thou getest fable noon ytoold for me’: Journey, Genre, and Community in the Parson’s Prologue
  3. Marco Nievergelt, Institut d’Etudes Avancées de Paris, “Guillaume de Deguileville and the Limits of Didactic Allegory: Literary Authorship as Residual Subjectivity”


5H Paper Panel: Middle English literature and the Archives (2): The Continent
(Bancroft 3.26)
Organizers: Julia Boffey, Queen Mary University of London and Ryan Perry, University of Kent
Chair: Ryan Perry

  1. Michael Van Dussen, McGill University, “Public Texts in London: Evidence from Central European Manuscripts”
  2. Sebastian Sobecki, University of Groningen, “A Southwark Tale: New Documents on Gower, Chaucer, and The Canterbury Tales


5I Paper Panel: Conscience and Confession
(David Sizer LT)
Organizer: Nicole D. Smith, University of North Texas
Chair: Nicole D. Smith

  1. Pamela M. Yee, University of Rochester, “‘Shryfte wythoute repentaunce’: Confession as Narrative Medicine in Book of the Duchess
  2. Kate Ash-Irisarri, Liverpool Hope University,  “Memory and Sapience in Dunbar's Confession Poems”
  3. Nicolette Zeeman, University of Cambridge, “Lay but Ordained? Rational but Patient? Conscience in Piers Plowman


5:30-7:00     Special Event: Lavinia Greenlaw
(People’s Palace Theatre)
One of the UK’s most important poets, Lavinia Greenlaw, will be reading from her latest book of poetry, A Double Sorrow, which imaginatively recreates Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde via a sequence of more than 200 poems, each seven lines long and working over three rhymes, loosely in the manner of rhyme royal, with stunning results. The book was short-listed for the 2014 Costa Poetry Award, and The Guardian writes that its words are “shadowed by the mystery that is the mark of real poetry.”


7:00-8:00    Reception
Generously sponsored by the English departments of Birkbeck, University of London; King's College London; Queen Mary, University of London; Universiyy College London; and the Centre for Late Antique and Medieval Studies, King's College London. 

(Octagon)